Category: Exhibitions

CAROLYN BROWN A Retrospective

Carolyn Brown, Interior Dome at Haram esh-Sharif, Old City of Jerusalem, 1990

RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION

1/18/19 – 2/16/19

Opening Reception Saturday, January 19, 2019, 4:00 p.m.

CAROLYN BROWN A Retrospective

Curated by Lauren LaRocca

Dallas-based artist Carolyn Brown is featured in a retrospective look at a lifetime of documentary photography in the Middle East, Latin America, and Texas.

At UT Dallas’s SP/N Gallery 3020 Stewart Dr., Richardson, TX, 75080

Dallas Museum of Art News and Exhibitions

Louisiana Bendolph (1960 -) ”Housetop” medallion, 2003, 77 x 73 inches, Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

DMA Acquires Work from Souls Grown Deep Foundation

The Dallas Museum of Art in November acquired seven works from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation through its museum transfer program, which places works from the foundation’s foremost collection of artworks by African American artists from the South in esteemed institutions around the country. The DMA acquisition, a partial gift/partial purchase from the foundation, includes works by Thornton Dial, Ronald Lockett, Nellie Mae Rowe, and four quilts created by Louisiana Bendolph, Mary Lee Bendolph, Amelia Bennett, and Annie Mae Young, women of Gee’s Bend Alabama.

 

Beverly and Donald S. Freeman Donate $4 Million to Establish The Freeman Family Exhibition Endowment at the DMA

Dallas Museum of Art longtime patrons Beverly and Donald S. Freeman have awarded $4 million to the Museum to establish the Freeman Family Exhibition Endowment. This exceptional gift is designed to advance the presentation of special exhibitions across the DMA’s encyclopedic collection, providing robust opportunities for the Museum to engage audiences with the presentation of art across cultures and time in innovative ways. As part of the endowment, each year the Freeman Family will select one special exhibition from the Museum’s program for which it will offer significant support.

 

Berthe Morisot, Woman Impressionist

February 24 – May 26, 2019

Co-organized by the Dallas Museum of Art, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Barnes Foundation (Philadelphia), and the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, this international exhibition is dedicated to one of the founding members of the French Impressionist movement, Berthe Morisot (1841–95). Berthe Morisot, Woman Impressionist will focus on the artist’s treatment of the modern figure through approximately 60 paintings from public and private collections around the world. A timely reevaluation of Morisot’s legacy, this exhibition will be the first dedicated presentation of her work held in the United States since 1987. 

 

Jonas Wood

March 24 – July 14, 2019

The Dallas Museum of Art will present the first major solo museum exhibition of work by American painter Jonas Wood, one of the most influential and exciting artists of our time. Bringing together approximately 35 works across 13 years of Wood’s career, the exhibition traces the artist’s fascination with psychology, memory, and the self to shed light on a practice that is both deeply personal and universal.

 

America Will Be! Surveying the Contemporary Landscape

April 6 – October 6, 2019

Drawing on works from the permanent collection of the Dallas Museum of Art, this exhibition presents the ways in which contemporary artists engage with landscapes, broadly defined, exploring how our natural and built environments intersect with our representations of ourselves and our communities.  “America will be!” is the rousing closing line of the 1935 poem, “Let America Be America Again,” in which Langston Hughes argues for a vision of America that is inclusive of the multiplicity of experiences at both the margins and the center. This exhibition explores how contemporary “landscapes” might better reflect the full diversity of the peoples who inhabit North and South America.

 

Dior: From Paris to the World

May 19, 2019 – September 1, 2019

Dior: From Paris to the World surveys more than 70 years of the House of Dior’s legacy, featuring a dynamic selection of over 100 haute couture dresses, as well as accessories, photographs, original sketches, runway videos, and other archival material. This exhibition profiles both Christian Dior himself and subsequent artistic directors, including Yves Saint Laurent (1958–1960), Marc Bohan (1961–1989), Gianfranco Ferré (1989–1996), John Galliano (1997–2011), Raf Simons (2012–2015), and Maria Grazia Chiuri (2016–present), all of whom have carried Dior’s vision into the 21st century.

 

On View at the DMA

Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty Through January 27, 2019

Concentrations 61: Runo Lagomarsino, EntreMundos Through February 17, 2019

Women + Design: New Works Through February 17, 2019

From Düsseldorf to Dallas: Postwar German Art in the DMA Collection Through February 17, 2019

Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow Through February 24, 2019

An Enduring Legacy: The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Collection of Impressionist and Modern Art Through February 2019

Modernity and the City Through April 7, 2019

Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road Through May 19, 2019

Women Artists in Europe from the Monarchy to Modernism Through June 9, 2019

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery Through April 26, 2020

Crow Museum of Asian Art Exhibitions and Events


Exhibitions

 

 

Hands and Earth:  Contemporary Japanese Ceramics (March 9, 2019-January 4, 2020)

The Crow Museum of Asian Art is proud to present the forthcoming exhibition Hands and Earth: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics. Featuring an in-depth selection of important works by Japanese ceramic artists of the last eighty years, the exhibition will showcase a range of shapes, glazes, and surface treatments. Most are by masters who are living and practicing today.

The ceramics reflect a duality of character, blending ingenuity with a dynamic relationship and deep respect for tradition. Current Japanese ceramic artists are widely considered among the most aesthetically and technically innovative in the world, yet their works often mirror the vibrant artistic tradition that began thousands of years ago. This exhibition offers a rare opportunity to see such significant examples of avant-garde approaches to clay by major artists.

Since 1950, the Japanese government has bestowed the title of “Living National Treasure” upon its practicing artists who have attained the highest level of mastery in their chosen fields of discipline. Of the thirty-five artists whose works will be shown in this exhibition, seven have been honored with this designation. Hands and Earth: Contemporary Japanese Ceramicswill mark the first time these world-renowned pieces are displayed together publicly in Texas.

The exhibition draws from the collection of Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz, who have amassed an important encyclopedic collection of major Japanese modern and contemporary ceramics. Their collection of more than 1,000 works is the largest, public or private, of contemporary Japanese ceramics outside of Japan.

Anyone with an appreciation for Japanese art or the blend of traditional and cutting-edge ceramic techniques will enjoy this unique opportunity to see these world-class masterpieces in the intimate setting of the newly remodeled Crow Museum of Asian Art.

 

Hands and Earth: Contemporary Japanese Ceramicsis presented by ORIX Americas Miyauchi Charitable Foundation.

 

Jacob Hashimoto: Clouds and Chaos (September 28, 2018 – April 14, 2019) features a large-scale site-specific installation and the U.S. premiere of his latest woodblock prints.

 

Our Asian Art Museum: The Crow at Twenty (September 28, 2018 – August 11, 2019) connects twenty masterworks from the permanent collection with twenty community and Museum leaders and friends.

 

The Art of Lacquer (September 28, 2018 – June 23, 2019) introduces lacquerware objects from the Museum’s collection to showcase one of the most enduring and distinctive forms of craftsmanship in the world.

 

Immortal Landscapes: Jade from the Collection (September 28, 2018 – June 23, 2019) highlights outstanding Chinese carved jade representations of mountain landscapes and forms from nature.

 

Avatars and Incarnations: Buddhist and Hindu Art from the Collection (September 28, 2018 – February 24, 2019) explores the concept of divine avatars in Hindu and Buddhist art represented in the collection.

 

 

Jacob Hashimoto, Nuvole
2006-2018
Silk, paper, bamboo, and cotton string.
Dimensions variable
Collection of the artist.

Events

 

Festival

Sat February 9, 11am-4pm

Chinese New Year Festival

NorthPark Center

Hoof it on over to NorthPark Center for the Crow Museum’s 20thannual Chinese New Year Festival celebrating 2019, the Year of the Earth Pig.Pigs are considered a symbol of wealth with their cute chubby faces and big ears, both being signs of good fortune. 2019’s festivities plan to be an absolute pig out with a wealth of activities to help ring in the new year including dragon and lion dances, art making for all ages, and giveaways throughout the Center.

 

Performance

Thu April 4, 2019, 8pm

Reflections and Repercussions: Aki Onda

Museum

New York-based artist and composer Aki Onda will create a site-specific performance inspired by Jacob Hashimoto’s Nuvole installation and the museum’s permanent collection. Using light, sound, and other media, the complex relationship between the concrete and the ephemeral is explored. Featuring Queens-based vocal artist Samita Sinha.

This exclusive performance is co-commissioned by the Crow Museum of Asian Art and the Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family SOLUNA International Music & Arts Festival.

Meadows Museum

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), The Choice of
a Model, 1868–74. Oil on wood. National Gallery of Art,
Washington. Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection), 2015.143.12.

Exhibitions

 

Fortuny: Friends and Followers

February 3–June 2, 2019

Recently the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, generously agreed to the long-term loan of an important painting by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838–1874): The Choice of a Model (1868–74). 

In honor of this prestigious loan, the Meadows Museum will host an exhibition dedicated to Fortuny and his world, drawing from its rich holdings of works on paper as well as key loans from private and public collections, including the Dallas Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in order to showcase many of the friends, family, and followers who engaged with the popular Spanish painter’s work. Fortuny’s paintings were especially prized by nineteenth-century American collectors as well as by contemporaneous artists. 

The legacy of that popularity resonates with the distinctly American provenance of both the Meadows’s Beach at Portici and the National Gallery’s The Choice of a Model, and their current ownership by American museums.

 

Lectures

 

The Spanish Look: Fortuny, Frenchmen, and the Sombrero Calañés

February 7, 2019  

Daniel Ralston, Meadows Curatorial Fellow

This lecture explores how Fortuny, his artistic circle, and his principal American collectors sought to define, construct, and propagate their own unique image of Spain.

 

Symposium: Finding a Way: Art Exchanges Between Russia and the United States

Wednesday, February 13, 5:00–7:00 p.m.

Th­is program will explore the politics of international cultural exchange since the 2011 moratorium on loans of art objects between Russian, government-owned museums and institutions in the United States. Th­e program will begin with a conversation between art museum directors Mikhail Piotrovski of the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, and Glenn Lowry of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, followed by a discussion between diplomatic officials from Russia and the United States. Daniel T. Orlovsky, Professor and George Bouhe Research Fellow in Russian Studies, Dedman College of Humanities & Sciences, will moderate both conversations.

 

Eakins, Sargent, and Chase: Fortuny’s Divergent American Admirers

March 7, 2019

Brian Allen, independent art historian

This talk examines the Spanish master’s appeal to a range of young American painters working in differing styles, from Thomas Eakin’s realism, to John Singer Sargent’s painterly naturalism, and William Merritt Chase’s adaptation of brushwork akin to Impressionism.

 

Dressing the Model

April 11, 2019

Gloria Groom, chair of European painting and sculpture, Art Institute of Chicago 

This lecture will explore why and how the artists of Mariano Fortuny’s circle—Tissot, Gérôme, Alfred Stevens, and other so-called academic painters—used fashion in their portraits and genre scenes, as well as how these artists intersected with the Impressionists, including Renoir, Monet, Degas, and Manet. 

 

 

LUIS MARTÍN LECTURE SERIES IN THE HUMANITIES

Art in Medieval and Renaissance Spain

Six Fridays: March 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 & April 5, 10:30–11:30 a.m.

While the Meadows Museum is perhaps best known for its excellent collection of Early Modern and Modern Spanish art, it is also home to significant holdings of medieval and Renaissance painting and sculpture. Recent years have seen the significant addition of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century panel paintings to the collection, which help to offer a more balanced history of Spanish art. In order to contextualize these important acquisitions, this lecture series will consider artmaking in the Middle Ages beginning with the oldest object in the Meadows collection, which dates to the tenth century. The six-part lecture series will conclude with a look forward to the stylistic shifts characteristic of Renaissance art and architecture in the sixteenth century.

 

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

FOCUS: Dirk Braeckman

Jan 26, 2019 – Mar 17, 2019

The photographs of Ghent-based Dirk Braeckman (b. 1958, Eeklo, Belgium) have a distinct stillness and quietude that counter the whirl of today’s visual landscape. Images of empty, unidentifiable interiors, architectural details, oceans, and partially obscured nude figures are just some examples of the artist’s subject matter. Since the mid-1980s, Braeckman has tested the limits of photography, especially its materials and processes. Challenging the reproducibility of a photographic image, particularly in light of today’s vast dissemination of images, Braeckman creates unique prints using analogue processes and physically taxing experimental methods in the darkroom.

 

Disappearing—California, c. 1970:  Bas Jan Ader, Chris Burden, Jack Goldstein

May 10, 2019 – Aug 11, 2019

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the exhibition Disappearing-California, c. 1970: Bas Jan Ader, Chris Burden, Jack Goldstein. These three artists shared a common interest in themes of disappearance and self-effacement, which manifested in works that were daring and often dangerous. Responding to the social and political circumstances of their time and the nascent field of feminist art, the artists used “disappearing” as a response to the anxiety of the 1970s. This major exhibition, curated by Philipp Kaiser for the Modern, reveals a fascinating intersection between major figures at a critical turning point for Southern Californian art.

Kimbell Art Museum

Exhibitions

The Lure of Dresden: Bellotto at the Court of Saxony

February 10 — 

April 28, 2019

Bernardo Bellotto is recognized as one of the greatest view painters in history, acquiring his fame in mid-eighteenth-century Dresden as the court painter for the elector of Saxony, Frederick Augustus II—who was also King Augustus III of Poland. Over the course of a decade, Bellotto produced dozens of breathtaking depictions of the city and its environs, most measuring over eight feet in width. The success and renown of these grand, comprehensive works would earn Bellotto prestigious commissions at prominent courts throughout Europe.

Bellotto’s magnificent paintings of Dresden are now in the collection of the Gemäldegalerie (Picture Gallery) of the Dresden State Art Collections and will be on loan to the Kimbell Art Museum for the special exhibition The Lure of Dresden: Bellotto at the Court of Saxony, on view February 10 through April 28, 2019. They will be accompanied by portraits and allegories of the elector and his queen, as well as view paintings of Venice and Saxony by Bellotto’s uncle and teacher Antonio Canaletto and Dresden court painter Alexander Thiele.

Visitors to the exhibition will have the unique opportunity to view the majesty that was Dresden in the 1700s. One of the greatest cities of eighteenth-century Europe, it is only now, following its near-total destruction in the Second World War, being rebuilt to its former glory—with the aid of Bellotto’s pictorial legacy.

Lectures & Discussions

 

Bellotto Inaugural Lectures & Symposia

The Lure of Dresden: Bellotto at the Court of Saxony

Saturday, February 9, 10:00 am–1:00 pm

Free lectures by experts from the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden—the magnificent Dresden State Art Collections—will inaugurate the exhibition The Lure of Dresden: Bellotto at the Court of Saxony.

 

Artful Readings: The Weight of Ink, by Rachel Kadish

Friday, February 15, 5:30 pm–7:00 pm

View the full listing of the Kimbell’s upcoming Lectures & Discussions at https://www.kimbellart.org. 

The Warehouse

Koji Enokura, Untitled No. 13

Topologies

May 14, 2018 – April 13, 2019

Artists throughout the post–World War II period have been fascinated by the ways in which space can be activated. One key model has been the notion of topology (“logic of place”), which centers on the concept of geometric transformation, in which space and shape can be expanded, contracted, distorted, and twisted while the structure of the object remains constant throughout.

Taking this definition as a launching point, topology appeared in postwar art in the late 1960s. A turn away from the fixed structures of Euclidean geometry and empiricism, topological properties as applied in art include connection via a breakdown of boundaries, the use of open structures, and a cross-pollination of disciplines that questions systems of knowledge. Movement and change, rather than a static object itself, constitutes the artwork. Topologies demonstrates how this mathematical field and its implications came into use by visual artists who were expanding systems-based practices in a variety of media around the world.

Two conceptions of topology by artists whose works are on view at The Rachofsky House provide key axes to this exhibition. In Japan, the idea was interpreted through a physics of form foundational to the Mono-ha group’s breakthrough Land art piece Phase—Mother Earth (1968) by artist Nobuo Sekine, which operates on a continuous renewal of perception through a cycle of creation and recreation. In the United States, artist Dan Graham introduced topology in his seminal essay “Subject Matter” (1969), describing perceptual effects in process-based practices in which “the spectator’s visual field . . . shifts in a topology of expansion, contraction, or skew.” Together, these ideas from different parts of the world establish the radical significance of the idea that form may remain continuous despite changes that occur over time.

Gathering more than 100 works created between 1952 and 2016 by 61 artists, Topologies offers both snapshots of particular moments in time and historical lineages that unfold over years. It draws from The Rachofsky Collection’s strong formal and conceptual holdings on international practices that emphasize process and materiality. The show expands on themes including permutation and distortion in space, inversions and other shifts in the body’s phenomenological relationship to space, material transition based on gravity and entropy, the politics of displacement, and reconceiving abject encounters between the synthetic and organic.

Topologies draws works from The Rachofsky Collection, the Dallas Museum of Art, Deedie Rose, and Jennifer and John Eagle.

Mika Yoshitake

Exhibition Curator

The Reading Room

Francis Almendárez

The Potential Wanderer

January 19, 2019 – March 2, 2019

The Reading Room presents The Potential Wanderer, an exhibition by Houston-based Francis Almendárez from January 19 through March 2. Blending video, installation, sound, and performance, Almendárez investigates the liminal space one occupies as a second-generation immigrant, examining how identity develops and functions within the overlapping of cultures. The exhibition is curated by Caroline Elbaor. Please join us for the opening reception on Saturday, January 19 from 6 to 9 pm. There will be a performance by Almendárez at 6 pm. Almendárez is a 2018 Houston Artadia Awardee. He has exhibited in the United States and abroad in the United Kingdom, France, Russia, Germany and Portugal.

For further information: Karen Weiner 214 952 4109

The Reading Room, 3715 Parry Avenue, Dallas

Nasher Sculpture Center

Isa Genzken

2019 Nasher Prize Laureate is Isa Genzken

With a career spanning four decades, Isa Genzken has continually reinvented the language of sculpture by creating objects inspired by popular culture and historical events that explore the complexities of contemporary realism. Engaging a diverse range of media such as wood, plaster, concrete, textiles, and detritus and working in a variety of modes, including sculpture, photography, filmmaking, painting, drawing, and collage, Genzken transforms vernacular materials into wholly unique forms. Her inventive, ad hoc approach to making, as well as her fearless embrace of chaos and change, has inspired a generation of artists, even as she continues to adapt, expand, and redefine her protean oeuvre.  

Exhibition

Sterling Ruby: Sculpture

February 2, 2019 – April 21, 2019

Sterling Ruby’s multifaceted practice encompasses sculpture, ceramics, installation, textiles, clothing, painting, collage, photography, and video.  Featuring nearly 30 large- and moderately-scaled sculptures spanning his career, Sterling Ruby: Sculpture will be the first museum exhibition to survey the great variety of sculptural work of one the most significant contemporary artists working today.

Events

FREE First Saturdays February 2, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Great Create 2019 Sponsor Party February 5, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

‘til Midnight at the Nasher February 15, 6 p.m.–12 a.m.

Workshop: Material Mayhem February 21, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Soundings: New Music at the Nasher March 1, 7:30 p.m.

Waging war seems as inevitable a part human nature as our mortality. The grotesque rituals of war are represented with horrifying honesty in Francisco Goya’s book of etchings Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War) and form the foundation of Martin Bresnick’s Caprichos Enfáticos (Emphatic Caprices).

Purchase tickets online at nashersculpturecenter.org/soundings

The Great Create Family Kick-Off Party March 2, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

FREE First Saturdays March 2, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

‘til Midnight at the Nasher March 15, 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

360: Speaker Series: Judy Chicago March 23, 11 a.m.

Nasher Prize Student Festival March 24, 1 – 4 p.m.

Nasher Prize Graduate Symposium April 4, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Nasher Prize Dialogues April 5

FREE First Saturdays April 6, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

360: Speaker Series: Leveling the Playing Field: What Pro Sports Can Offer the Gallery System April 13, 2 p.m.

‘til Midnight at the Nasher April 19, 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

SOLUNA: Musical Celebration of Isa Genzken April 23, 7:30 p.m.

The Great Create: By Artists. For Kids. April 28, 1 – 4 p.m.

FREE First Saturdays May 4, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Learn more about these and upcoming events at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

UTA Visual Resources Gallery: ‘Hushangabad: A Portrait of a North Indian Village; Photography by Andrew Ward

“Hushangabad: A Portrait of a North Indian Village, Nov. 1968 – Jan. 1970; Photography by Andrew Ward”

The exhibition includes never before seen photographs selected from the portfolio of artist and historian, Andrew Ward.

More information click here.

The gallery is located in the Visual Resource Commons & Gallery, FA2109, 2nd floor, Fine Arts Building. The Gallery is open M – F: 9am – 5pm.

For more information on these or other artworks from the UT Arlington Fine Arts Collection, please contact Cheryl Mitchell, Collections Specialist, at cherylm@uta.edu.

Dallas Museum of Art News and Exhibitions

(Left) Dr. Michelle Rich (Right) Dr. Heather Ecker

DMA Welcomes Two New Curators

The Dallas Museum of Art created a new endowed curatorial position in Islamic and Medieval Art, appointing Dr. Heather Ecker as the museum’s first Marguerite S. Hoffman and Thomas W. Lentz Curator of Islamic and Medieval Art. Ecker brings nearly two decades of diverse curatorial, teaching, and institutional experiences to the role. Ecker trained in objects conservation at the Institute of Archaeology, University of London, and held conservation internships and fellowships at leading institutions, including the British Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, London. Ecker’s extensive knowledge of conservation practices and oversight will be integral to her new role at the DMA.

Also over the summer, The Dallas Museum of Art named Dr. Michelle Rich as The Ellen and Harry S. Parker III Assistant Curator of the Arts of the Americas. Dr. Rich joins the DMA after the completion of two prestigious Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellowships at national museums: first at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and currently at the San Antonio Museum of Art.

 

Derick Baegert, The Descent from the Cross, c. 1480-90, oil on oak panel, Dallas Museum of Art, Marguerite and Robert Hoffman Fund in memory of Dr. William B. Jordan.

Dallas Museum of Art acquires Derick Baegert panel, a first for a US museum

The Dallas Museum of Art has acquired The Descent from the Cross by the German master painter Derick Baegert (c. 1440–c. 1509). Painted around 1480–1490, the monumentally scaled panel is an exceptional example of Baegert’s distinctive style, which reflects the transitional period between medieval and Renaissance painting. As the inaugural acquisition of the Marguerite and Robert Hoffman Fund for pre-1700 European Art, this masterpiece of Northern European painting is the first work of its kind to enter the DMA’s holdings and is the first work by this artist to enter a US museum. Established in 2013, the Marguerite and Robert Hoffman Fund was conceived to expand and enhance the Museum’s collection of European art, primarily of the Renaissance and Baroque eras, through the establishment of a $17 million endowment. “This remarkable and rare painting by Baegert will be a cornerstone of the Old Master European holdings at the DMA,” said Agustín Arteaga, the DMA’s Eugene McDermott Director. “With this extraordinary acquisition, the Museum can now illustrate the development of art history from the Gothic period to the Renaissance through the DMA’s permanent collection. We are deeply grateful to Marguerite Hoffman for the remarkable gift she bestowed on the Museum in her name and that of her late husband, Robert, with the endowment of the fund, which has made possible this truly transformative addition to the Museum’s permanent collection.”

 

An Enduring Legacy: The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Collection of Impressionist and Modern Art

June 14, 2018 to February 17, 2019 | Barrel Vault

Exclusively at the DMA

“Extraordinary….Bequest to the DMA of masterpiece artworks is transformative.” – Dallas Morning News

An Enduring Legacy: The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Collection of Impressionist and Modern Art is dedicated to the single largest benefactors in the Museum’s history, the late Margaret and Eugene McDermott, visionary patrons of the arts, education, and healthcare in Dallas. On view beginning June 14, An Enduring Legacy will present their magnificent final bequest of 32 19th- and early 20th-century artworks to The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund to benefit the DMA. Among the masterworks featured in the exhibition are paintings, sculptures, and works on paper by Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Edvard Munch, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Henry Moore, among many others.

 

Gerald Murphy, Watch, 1925, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the artists, 1963.75.FA, © Estate of Honoria Murphy Donnelly, Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Traveling Survey of Precisionism, Early 20th-Century American Culture’s Love AffairWith Technology in the Machine Age

The Dallas Museum of Art presents the first large-scale traveling exhibition in over 20 years to look at early 20th-century American culture’s love affair with technology and mechanization that influenced architecture, design, and the visual arts. Hailed as “illuminating” upon its opening at The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Cult of the Machine: Precisionism and American Art “captures that other era when Americans were obsessed with new technology.” The DMA is pleased to be the only other venue to present this well-received and revealing exhibition that includes 14 superb examples of Precisionist painting, photography, and silver work from its permanent collection by such well-known masters as Charles Sheeler, Charles Demuth, Gerald Murphy, Paul Strand, Walter Dorwin Teague, and William Waldo Dodge, Jr.

 

 

 

Berthe Morisot, Woman Impressionist 

February 24, 2019 to May 26, 2019 | Chilton II Gallery

DMA co-organized & curated

“Once overlooked, Impressionist painter Berthe Morisot is about to be Everywhere –A new traveling exhibition will underscore Morisot’s crucial role in the development of Impressionism.” – Artnet

Co-organized by the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Barnes Foundation (Philadelphia), the Dallas Museum of Art, and the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, this international exhibition is dedicated to one of the founding members of the French Impressionist movement, Berthe Morisot (1841–95). Berthe Morisot, Woman Impressionist will focus on the artist’s treatment of the modern figure through approximately 60 paintings from public and private collections around the world. A timely reevaluation of Morisot’s legacy, this exhibition will be the first dedicated presentation of her work to be held in the United States since 1987, the very first solo exhibition of her work to be mounted in Canada, and the first time since 1941 that a French national museum will devote a show exclusively to this seminal and revolutionary Impressionist painter.

 

Runo Lagomarsino, West Is Everywhere you Look, 2016, 9 maps, motors, cables and wires, Courtesy the artist and Francesca Minini, Milano

Concentrations 61: Runo Lagomarsino, Entremundos

The Dallas Museum of Art presents Concentrations 61: Runo Lagomarsino, Entremundos, the first US solo museum exhibition for the conceptual artist. The exhibition, which is on view September 30, 2018, through April 14, 2019, explores the unstable nature of national identities and mythologies through the transformation of everyday objects and phrases into historically referential works of art. With these deceptively simple transformations, Lagomarsino points to the volatile relationship between power and geography. Concentrations 61 spans two galleries and features new commissions and previous works specifically reconfigured for the DMA.

 

 

 

On View at the DMA

Word and Image: Works on Paper from the 15th Through 20th Centuries

Through October 21, 2018

Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty

Opens October 21, 2018

Women + Design: New Works

Opens October 28, 2018

Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow

Opens November 18, 2018

Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit

Through December 2, 2018

Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road

Through December 9, 2018

Women Artists in Europe from the Monarchy to Modernism

Opens December 22, 2018

Cult of the Machine: Precisionism and American Art

Through January 6, 2019

Concentrations 61: Runo Lagomarsino, EntreMundos

Through February 16, 2019

An Enduring Legacy: The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Collection of Impressionist and Modern Art

Through February 2019

Crow Museum of Asian Art Exhibitions and Events

Calendar of Events at the Crow Museum of Asian Art 

September-December 2018

 

Reservations

To learn more about our programs and to register or purchase tickets to an event, please visit our museum website at crowmuseum.org, or call 214-979-6430.

 

EXHIBITIONS

 

Jacob Hashimoto: Clouds and Chaos (September 28, 2018 – April 7, 2019) will feature a large-scale site-specific installation and the U.S. premiere of his latest woodblock prints.

 

Our Asian Art Museum: The Crow at Twenty (September 28, 2018 – August 11, 2019) will connect twenty master works from the permanent collection with twenty community and Museum leaders and friends.

 

The Art of Lacquer (September 28, 2018 – January 6, 2019) introduces lacquerware objects from the Museum’s collection to showcase one of the most enduring and distinctive forms of craftsmanship in the world.

 

Immortal Landscapes: Jade from the Collection (September 28, 2018 – January 6, 2019) will highlight outstanding Chinese carved jade representations of mountain landscapes and forms from nature.

 

Avatars and Incarnations: Buddhist and Hindu Art from the Collection (September 28, 2018 – February 24, 2019) will explore the concept of divine avatars in Hindu and Buddhist art represented in the collection.

 

WORKSHOPS/LECTURES

 

Educator Program

Sat Sept 8, 10 AM-1 PM

Engaging Educators: Mandalas, Mindfulness, and the Mystical Arts of Tibet

Center for Contemplative Leadership + Online

  • Educators near and far are invited to explore innovative and playful PreK-12 interdisciplinary and mindfulness-based curricula, including art-making, centered around Mystical Arts of Tibet. Available in-person and online. $20 for Members, $25 for Public.

 

Well-being Workshop

Sat Sept 15, 10 AM-2 PM

Breathe: Art and Well-being Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Veterans and first responders are invited to gather for monthly workshops centered around art, qigong, and making. Free for Veterans and First Responders.

 

Artist Talk

Fri Sept 28, 7-8 PM

A Conversation with Jacob Hashimoto

  • Artist Jacob Hashimoto and curator Jacqueline Chao discuss Hashimoto’s newest site-specific installation and exhibition JACOB HASHIMOTO: Clouds and Chaos. $9 for Members, $12 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Fri Sept 28, 8-10 PM

Artist 2 Artist: Clouds and Chaos

Pearl Art Studio

  • Bring a friend or make some new ones as you create a collaborative work of art in the spirit of JACOB HASHIMOTO: Clouds and Chaos. $17 for Members, $20 for Public.

 

Book Talk

Sat Sept 29, 11 AM-12 PM

Stan Went Fishing: Stories and Images of Waking Up

Lotus Shop

  • Join Author and Leadership Consultant Nancy Dorrier for readings and insight into her writing practice that led to the creation of her new book about life and the art of living in the moment. FREE.

 

Studio Workshop

Sat Sept 29, 1-3 PM

Family Creative Writing Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Families, join Author Nancy Dorrier and experience the joy of reading some of your favorite books followed by a chance to write, draw, and create your own stories to share. Members: $20 for Family; Public: $24 for Family.

 

Studio Workshop

Sun Sept 30, 1-4 PM

Creative Writing Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Stan Went Fishing, Stories and Images of Waking Upgrew out of a daily writing practice to clear heads and open hearts: a practice that author Nancy Dorrier will be sharing and exploring in this workshop. Admission includes a copy of the book. $34 for Members, $40 for Public.

 

New Series with the Director

Four sessions on Tuesdays: Oct 2, Oct 16, Oct 30, Nov 13, 2-4 PM

The Art of Compassion: A Study on Being with Amy Lewis Hofland

  • This fall series curated by Museum Director Amy Lewis Hofland, offers new ways of seeing, contemplating, and being with four Asian art history-based discussions sourcing art and compassion in action and why we need it now. The course includes a reading list. Class size is limited to 10. $150 for the Series (4 Classes) for Members, $200 for Public.

 

Well-being Lecture

Fri Oct 5, 12-1PM

The Ayurvedic Way
Center for Contemplative Leadership

  • Join us for monthly Ayurvedic talks by registered Culinary Dietician and Ayurvedic Wellness Expert Sapna Punjabi-Gupta. FREE.

 

Studio Workshop

Thu Oct 11, 6-9 PM; Sun Oct 14, 1-4 PM

Mandala Weaving Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Radial designs, such as mandalas, are associated with spirituality in multiple cultures around the world. This workshop will teach participants how to make a woven mandala using the symbolic meaning of the inner circle as inspiration. $38 for Members, $45 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Sat Oct 20-Sun Oct 21, 10 AM-2 PM

Breathe: Art and Well-being Workshop + Artist in Residence

Pearl Art Studio

  • Veterans and first responders are invited to gather for monthly workshops centered around art, qigong, and making. Free for Veterans and First Responders.

 

Weekend Workshop

Sat Oct 20, 9am-3pm and Sun Oct 21 9 AM-12 PM

Immersive Mindfulness Training with MasterMind

Center for Contemplative Leadership

  • This Immersive Mindfulness Training will teach mindfulness as a way of bringing greater awareness, ease, energy, and freedom into daily life. $375 for Members, $395 for Public; Invest by Sep 29: $280 for Members; $295 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Thu Oct 25, 6-8 PM (last Thursday of the every month)

Hands-On Happy Hour

Pearl Art Studio

  • Liven up your Thursday evening with drinks and art making inspired by the arts of Asia. $25 forMembers, $30 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Sun Oct 28, 1-3 PM (last Sunday of every month)

Art of Stress Reduction Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Relax and free your mind through an art activity that focuses on the process rather than the finished product. $25 forMembers, $30 for Public.

 

Well-being Lecture

Thu Nov 1, 1-2PM

The Ayurvedic Way

  • Join us for monthly Ayurvedic talks by registered Culinary Dietician and Ayurvedic Wellness Expert Sapna Punjabi-Gupta. $12 forMembers, $15 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Fri Nov 2, 5-7 PM

Teen Make

Pearl Art Studio

  • Like art? Like food? The Crow Museum has you covered! Grab a plate, meet some friends, and get creative with relaxed art making. $15 for teens ages 14 – 18.

 

Educator Program

Sat Nov 3, 10 AM-1 PM

Engaging Educators: Printmaking, Art, and Compassion in Action

Pearl Art Studio + Online

  • Educators join us for this engaging workshop inspired by the Mystical Arts of Tibetresidency, and contemporary exhibition, JACOB HASHIMOTO: Clouds and Chaos, as catalysts for exploring curricula through printmaking. Available in-person and online. $20 for Members, $25 for Public.

 

New Series

Mondays, Nov 5, Nov 19, Dec 3, Dec 17, Jan 7, Jan 28, Feb 11, Feb 25; 5-7 PM

Red Truck Program: Creative Writing and Storytelling

Center for Contemplative Leadership + Online

  • Join this innovative program designed for adults who want to jump into writing to discover a new world of creativity and storytelling. This approach to creative writing has a freedom and lightheartedness to it as we explore what we have to say about our lives and dreams. $1000 for Members, $1250 for Public.

 

Studio Class

Tuesdays, Nov 6, 13, and Dec 4, 6-9 PM

Reductive Woodblock Printing Class

Pearl Art Studio

  • In this four-part course, students will learn how to use a single block to create multi-colored woodblock print edition through selective carving, layering, and registration. $238 forMembers, $280 for Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Wed Nov 7, 10-11 AM

Start with Art

Pearl Art Studio

  • Designed for children ages 2-5, this experience will start with mindful movement, followed by unstructured art making. $12 forMembers, $15 for Public.

 

Well-being Workshop

Sat Nov 10, 12:00-4 PM

Breathe: Art and Well-being Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • The Breatheprogram invites local veterans and first responders to gather for monthly workshops centered around art, qigong, and making. Free for Veterans and First responders.

 

Studio Workshop

Sun Nov 11, 1-4 PM

Let’s Go (Make and) Fly a Kite!

Pearl Art Studio

  • Join us to make and decorate a Japanese-style kite and get flying! Ages 12 and up welcome. $34 forMembers, $40 for Public.

 

AfterDark

Fri Nov 16, 6 PM-Midnight

Kites at Night

  • Throughout your evening, enjoy kite making, meditations in the clouds, printmaking, and demonstrations. FREE.

Studio Workshop

Sun Nov 25, 1-4 PM (last Sunday of every month)

Stress Reduction Workshop

Pearl Art Studio

  • Relax and free your mind through an art activity inspired by the arts of Asia that focuses on the process rather than the finished product. $25 forMembers, $30 Public.

 

Studio Workshop

Thu Nov 29, 6–8 PM (last Thursday of every month)

Hands-On Happy Hour

Pearl Art Studio

  • Liven up your Thursday evening with drinks and art making inspired by the arts of Asia. $25 for Members, $30 for Public.

 

EVENTS

 

Festival

Tue Sept 25, 6:30-9:30 PM

Otsukimi Moon Viewing Festival

Klyde Warren Park

  • Celebrate the full autumn moon with an evening of onstage performances, artist demonstrations, art making, and treats and sweets under the night sky. In partnership with the Japan-America Society of Dallas/Fort Worth. FREE.

 

Artist Residency

Oct 6 – Oct 13, 10 AM-5 PM

Mystical Arts of Tibet

  • Join us in welcoming back the much-loved Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery as they construct the Green Tara sand mandala for the Crow Museum.

 

Open Studio

Oct 6 – Oct 13, 10 AM-5 PM

Community Mandala

Pearl Art Studio

  • Experience the art of mandalas with Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery while creating a magnificent mandala sand painting designed by local artist Isabella Brown. FREE.

 

Public Tour

Daily Oct 6 – Oct 12, 2-3 PM

Monks and Mandala Public Tour

  • Get a deeper look at the sand mandala through a guided tour and conversation. FREE.

 

Presentation

Sat Oct 6, 11 AM-12 PM

Mystical Arts of Tibet Opening Ceremony

  • Experience the beauty of this ancient ritual and blessing of the space as the Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery prepare for the creation of the sand mandala. $25 for Members, $30 for Public.

 

Family Day

Sat Oct 6, 12-4 PM

Museum Unveiled! Crow Museum of Asian Art Grand Opening Celebration

  • All are welcome to explore the newly minted Crow Museum of Asian Artwith works of art, activities, performances, tours, and more. FREE.

 

Well-being

Sun Oct 7, 1-2 PM

Meditation with the Monks

Klyde Warren Park

  • Open to all and for all, stop by for a relaxing hour of meditation led by the Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery. FREE.

 

Lecture

Tue Oct 9, 7-8 PM

Tea and Conversation with the Monks: Tibet Today: A History of a Diaspora

  • Enjoy a cup of tea and sit with the Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery as they share the history of Tibet over the last century. $17 for Members, $20 for Public.

 

Lecture

Thu Oct 11, 12-1 PM

Tea and Conversation with the Monks: The Symbolism of the Sand Mandala

  • Join in a conversation with the Tibetan Buddhist Monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery around the iconography found in these sacred representations of religious texts. $17 for Members,$20 for Public.

 

Special Event

Fri Oct 12, 11 AM-2 PM

Meet-A-Monk

Klyde Warren Park

  • Stop by the East Lawn at Klyde Warren Park to meet the Tibetan Buddhist Monks from the Mystical Arts of Tibet artist residency and play a game or two. FREE.

 

Presentation

Sat Oct 13, 3-4 PM

Mystical Arts of Tibet Closing Ceremony

  • In a ceremony representing the impermanence of all that exists, the Tibetan Buddhist Monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery conclude their weeklong residency by dismantling the sand mandala. $34 forMembers, $40 for Public.

 

Presentation

Sat Oct 13, 4:30 PM

Mystical Arts of Tibet Sand Dispersal

  • Join the Tibetan Buddhist Monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery as they release the healing sands from the Green Tara mandala into the environment. FREE.

 

Presentation

Thu Oct 18, 3-5 PM

Betty Reiter Boutique Fashion Show and Tea

  • Join us for an elegant afternoon of high fashion and tea, generously hosted by Betty Reiter Boutique. Featuring pieces by Korean designer Lie Sang Bong, the fashion show will be held in the Museum’s newly remodeled galleries. Lie Sang Bong, dubbed the “Korean McQueen,” is known for his architecturally shaped silhouettes, vivid palettes, and energized volumes, and his clothing has been worn by the likes of Lady Gaga and Beyoncé. Tea and light hors d’oeuvres will be served. All proceeds benefit the Crow Museum of Asian Art. $100 per person; space is limited.

 

AfterDark

Fri Oct 19, 6 PM – Midnight

Up In The Clouds

  • Enjoy an evening up in the clouds with all things found in the sky inspired by our new exhibition JACOB HASHIMOTO: Clouds and Chaos.

 

Special Event

Sat Nov 3, 6 PM

Jade Ball

Crow Museum and Belo Mansion

  • Celebrate 20 years of the Crow with the second annual Jade Ball black-tie gala, chaired this year by Carmen Hancock. This elegant fundraising event benefits the Museum’s education programs which serve thousands of children, teens, and adults year-round. Visit crowmuseum.org for ticket information and more details.

 

 

ONGOING

 

Open Studio

Saturdays from 10 AM–5 PM

Pearl Art Studio

Every Saturday the Pearl Art Studio will be open to the public to drop in or stay awhile with hands-on making and creative fun. FREE.

 

Daily Well-being

Most of our Well-being classes are back at the Crow Museum of Asian Art. All classes are free, and donations are welcomed and appreciated.

 

Center for Contemplative Leadership

Mondays at 1 PM, Starting Oct 15

The Quiet Room

  • Join us for a moment or an hour of silence: the place you can really hear yourself think. Bring a lunch or just come sit in a space of reflection and quiet. The room is open and the mats and time are yours. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Tuesdays at 1 PM, starting Oct 16

Qigong

  • Qigong(pronounced Chee Gung) is sometimes described as being “the soul of Tai Chi.” Dating back more than 4500 years, qigong is considered one of the deepest roots of traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. This practice builds strength, flexibility, and balance in the muscles and joints through gentle, flowing movements. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Wednesdays at 1 PM, starting Oct 17

Mindful Meet Up

  • Join us to learn science-based mindfulness practices to reduce stress, increase attention, and strengthen the capacity for compassion. This class focuses on breathing techniques and brief meditative exercises that can be readily incorporated into all aspects of daily life. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Klyde Warren Park

Thursdays at 10 AM, starting Oct 18

Walking Meditation

  • Put on—or better yet, take off—your walking shoes and enjoy a mindful stroll in downtown Dallas’ urban green space, Klyde Warren Park. This relaxing practice uses mindful movement in an outdoor setting to enhance the connections among the body, mind, and our surroundings. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Fridays at 1 PM, starting Oct 19

Slow Flow Vinyasa Yoga

  • Go with the flow and enjoy the slow. Create balance, stability, and support for the spine and the entire body by syncing the breath with yoga postures in this flow-based class. This practice builds heat, flexibility, and strength while staying kind and gentle on the body. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Saturdays at 10 AM, starting Oct 20

Tai Chi

  • Tai Chi (Tai Chi Chuanor Tai ji) is a Chinese martial art known for its graceful, meditative form. It involves a series of movements practiced in a slow, focused manner to decrease stress, increase balance and agility, and promote overall physical and mental well-being. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Sundays at 1 PM, starting Oct 21

Meditation

  • End your weekend with relaxation and rejuvenate for the week ahead. Join this guided group meditation to experience a deeper sense of awareness and increase your attention and focus. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

 

Sundays from 2–6 PM, starting Oct 21

Compassion Now: Meditation in the Galleries

  • On Sundays, stop by anytime between 2:00 and 6:00 pm for contemplative reflection. This is not a guided meditation class but rather the opportunity to take some time out of your day to be still, nurture self-compassion, and offer compassion to the world. Meditation mats are provided. FREE, donations greatly appreciated.

Amon Carter Museum of American Art News, Exhibitions

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art Announces the Expansion of the Museum’s Curatorial Department with the Addition of Two New Positions

Kristen Gaylord Joins the Museum as the Assistant Curator of Photographs and

Spencer Wigmore is Appointed Assistant Curator of Painting, Sculpture, and Works on Paper

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art announced the addition of two new curatorial positions appointed to Kristen Gaylord, Assistant Curator of Photographs, and Spencer Wigmore, Assistant Curator of Painting, Sculpture, and Works on Paper. Under the direction of Brett Abbott, the museum’s Director of Collection and Exhibitions, Gaylord and Wigmore will assist with initiatives aimed at caring for and presenting the works of art in the museum’s collection from their respective areas of focus through research, conservation, development and contribution to publications, and organization of exhibitions.

Hedda Sterne (1910–2011)
Untitled (Metaphores and Metamorphoses VIII), 1967
Lithograph
© 2018 The Hedda Sterne Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Exhibitions

Hedda Sterne: Printed Variations Through January 27, 2019

In Our Own Words: Native Impressions Through October 7, 2018

The Theatrical Wild West Through October 7, 2018

Commanding Space: Women Sculptors of Texas Through November 18

 

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions and Lectures

2018-2019 Exhibition Schedule

PLEASE NOTE: The Modern will continue to be free every Friday and half-price every Sunday.

Laurie Simmons. Courtesy of The Modern

Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera

October 14, 2018 – January 27, 2019

 

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents a major survey of works by Laurie Simmons (American, born 1949), organized by Andrea Karnes, senior curator, with full support of the artist. This exhibition showcases Simmons’s photographs spanning the last four decades, from 1976 to the present, a small selection of sculpture, and two films.

As someone from the generation raised on television and advertising, and as a woman who matured as an artist in New York in the 1980s amidst a thriving urban backdrop, Laurie Simmons absorbed the idea that identity in America is multifaceted yet homogenized through a blitz of cultural signs. From the beginning, Simmons has used photography in a conceptual mode to investigate manufactured gender constructs and stereotypes and how they impact us all. In her early iconic photographs, she staged miniature domestic scenes featuring female dolls in doll houses in a process similar to that of the ad agencies on Madison Avenue that invented romanticized versions of women and men; however, Simmons showed the flip side of the American dream. She has since created 36 photographic series using combinations of plastic props, actual objects, dolls, doll houses, and people posed to look like dolls, largely to portray the role-playing of real women and men. Examining key works over the course of her career elucidates how photography became the ideal framework for her observations of archetypal Western gender roles — a topic as potent today as it was when she first began making art.

“Simmons’s imagery takes into account her own experience of coming of age in the 1950s,” says Andrea Karnes. “Without being autobiographical or spelling out specific narratives, however, the work strikes a psychological chord, seeming to underscore the difficulties of living the American dream, or in a larger context, any dream of domestic bliss.”

Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera is organized by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and travels to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in 2019.

 

Lectures in conjunction with Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera:

 

Andrea Karnes in conversation with Laurie Simmons

October 9, 7 pm

Artist Laurie Simmons discusses the making of the Modern’s major survey Big Camera/Little Camera with the exhibition’s curator, Modern Senior Curator Andrea Karnes. This special presentation offers insight into Simmons’s work featured in the exhibition, her career, and the processes and premise of Big Camera/Little Camera as a collaborative effort between artist and curator.

 

Laurie Simmons and Carroll Dunham

November 13, 7 pm

Artist Laurie Simmons is in conversation with her husband, artist Carroll Dunham, for an extraordinary presentation in which the two renowned artists discuss the role art plays in their life together and how their life together informs their art, all in conjunction with the Modern’s survey of Simmons’s art, Big Camera/Little Camera.

 

Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Dwell: Aso Ebi, 2017. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchased as the gift of Nancy L. Dorman and Stanley Mazaroff, Baltimore, in Honor of Kristen Hileman, BMA 2018.79. Image copyright: Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London

FOCUS: Njideka Akunyili Crosby I Counterparts

December 1, 2018 – January 13, 2019

 Los Angeles-based artist and 2017 MacArthur Genius Fellow Njideka Akunyili Crosby draws upon her experience of moving from Nigeria to the United States while maintaining ties to her family in Africa and building relationships in America. Layers of paint, fabric, and photographic transfers not only energize the interiors and figures depicted in the artist’s works but serve as a metaphor for the complex merging of cultural backgrounds that contribute to Akunyili Crosby’s sense of self.

Akunyili Crosby’s works incorporate signs of both Nigeria and the United States through the images of hairstyles, fashions, architecture, and furnishings taken from Nigerian magazines and commemorative fabric printed with portraits, giving her paintings a global context. For her FOCUS exhibition, the artist has created a series of visually and conceptually mirrored pairs of paintings. One juxtaposes a Nigerian interior with Akunyili Crosby’s Los Angeles home. In another, a Nigerian table setting is matched with an American example. The Nigerian image is centered around the trappings of afternoon tea, a custom brought to the country by its British colonizers that continues to incorporate European food products. The composition also includes a colorful plastic African “Clonette” or “DeiDei” doll of a Caucasian girl in Western dress and a Kris Okotie album cover inspired by Michael Jackson, both symbols of a popular culture shared internationally. The American counterpart to this still life offers a more troubling take on the interface of cultures. Embedded in the accoutrements of a Thanksgiving feast is a “blackamoor” serving dish, a disturbing decoration that trivializes the terrible history of African slavery in America. The exhibition’s two largest works isolate contemplative figures in architectural contexts that are alternately informed by Nigerian and American homes. In these detailed images, Akunyili Crosby augments paint with Nigerian portrait fabrics produced for ceremonies such as weddings, burials, and political campaigns. (The artist’s mother was a respected politician.) She also applies photographic transfers from Nigerian fashion and society publications that connect traditional Nigerian styles, fabrics manufactured in the Netherlands, and Western trends.

The exhibition is organized by The Baltimore Museum of Art.

 

 

FOCUS: Dirk Braeckman

January 26 – March 17, 2019

The photographs of Ghent-based Dirk Braeckman (b. 1958, Eeklo, Belgium) have a distinct stillness and quietude that counter the whirl of today’s visual landscape. Images of empty, unidentifiable interiors, architectural details, oceans, and partially obscured nude figures are just some examples of the artist’s subject matter. Braeckman’s deeply gray photographs are often abstracted, contributing to the mystery and intrigue of what his images convey while adding a sense of distance to the intimate interiors and views he depicts. Rather than setting up scenes or shots, Braeckman travels with a camera and captures what he sees, including hotel rooms, museums, and vacant corridors; his approach is partly diaristic, yet because the locales are anonymous and the photographs’ titles are unclear codes, Braeckman’s work is relatable and open-ended, eschewing photography’s documentary impulse. This fluidity is intentional and meant to engage, as the artist states: “I’m not a storyteller, I’m an imagemaker. The story is made in the mind of the viewer.”

Since the mid-1980s, Braeckman has tested the limits of photography, especially its materials and processes. Challenging the reproducibility of a photographic image, particularly in light of today’s vast dissemination of images, Braeckman creates unique prints using analogue processes and physically taxing experimental methods in the darkroom. The individuality of his images and the physical nature of his processes are evocative of painting, as is the rich tactility his unglazed photographs embody.

 

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibition and Lectures

Balenciaga. Veste et robe. Ensemble (habillement). Cloqué matelassé lamé Lurex, doublure en crêpe de Chine. 1968. Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris.

Exhibitions

BALENCIAGA IN BLACK

October 7, 2018 to January 6, 2019

Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) is often called “the couturier’s couturier”—the fashion designer revered by all other fashion designers. From his first runway collection, in 1937, through the closure of his Paris salon, in 1968, Balenciaga’s clients were among the most influential trendsetters of the day. This autumn, the Kimbell Art Museum will partner with the Palais Galliera, the distinguished fashion museum of the city of Paris, to present Balenciaga in Black, an exhibition of more than one hundred pieces from the collections of the Galliera and the archives of the Maison Balenciaga.

The carefully selected costumes and accessories, all made by hand in the haute-couture ateliers of this fashion genius, share one major feature: they are all black. For Balenciaga, black was vibrant, capable of exhibiting a dazzling interplay of light through luxurious fabrics and materials. This exhibition reveals the masterful shapes created by the artist with apparently simple cuts and impeccably composed adornments of lace, embroidery, silk, fringes, beads, and sequins. These expertly executed, timeless silhouettes continue to inspire modern fashion.

This exhibition is organized by the Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Paris Musées.

 

GOYA IN BLACK AND WHITE

October 7, 2018 to January 6, 2019

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes is among the best-known figures in the history of Spanish art and renowned as one of the greatest painters of all time. He is also revered as one of history’s greatest draftsmen and printmakers. This exhibition will showcase more than seventy-five of his paramount works on paper from the unparalleled collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Goya in Black and White will explore the evolution of the artist’s graphic work in all media. The importance of black and white will be shown throughout the exhibition—not only literally, in black ink on white paper, but also figuratively, as in the oppositions of night and day, the balance between menacing shadow and hopeful light, that pervade the artist’s imagination. In the Kimbell’s exhibition, Goya’s principal series and best-known compositions, including the Caprichos series, The Sleep of Reason Produces MonstersDisasters of WarDisparates, and Tauromaquia, will be represented in detail, some works in multiple impressions, to show the creative evolution of the artistic process of a genius.

This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

 

Lectures & Discussions

Year-round evening, weekday, and Saturday lectures by Museum staff and guest speakers explore various topics relating to the permanent collection and special exhibitions on view at the Kimbell Art Museum.

CART captioning for public lectures and special exhibition symposia is available by request with at least three weeks advance notice. E-mail education@kimbellmuseum.org or call 817-332-8451, ext. 713, to place a request.

Some programs require advance reservations.

 

Friday Evening Lectures

SELECTED FRIDAYS, 6 PM

Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held throughout the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art.

Free; no registration required. Seating is limited. Pavilion Auditorium; simulcast in Kahn Auditorium.

Guillaume Kientz, curator, department of paintings, Musée du Louvre, Paris
Friday, October 12, 2018 – 6:00 PM
Hamish Bowles, European editor-at-large, Vogue, New York

Friday, October 26, 2018 – 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Thomas E. Rassieur, John E. Andrus III Curator of Prints and Drawings, The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis

Friday, November 2, 2018 –6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Valerie Steele, director and chief curator, The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, New York

Friday, December 7, 2018 – 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Wednesday Series: Art in Context Lectures

SELECTED WEDNESDAYS, 12:30 PM

These lectures, part of a continuing series, introduce the permanent collection and selected exhibitions on view at the Kimbell Art Museum.

Free; no reservations required. Seating is limited.

Piano Auditorium

Scott Winterrowd, director of education, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Tara Zanardi, associate professor, art history, Hunter College, City University of New York

Wednesday, November 7, 2018 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Rafael Barrientos Martinez, PhD student, University of California, Los Angeles

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

 

The Artist’s Eye

SELECTED SATURDAYS, 11 AM

What does the art of the past mean to the artist of the present? In this ongoing program, moderated by Kimbell staff, artists and architects discuss works in the Museum’s collection, share the special insights of the practicing professional, and relate older art to contemporary artistic concerns, including their own.

Free; no reservations required.  Seating is limited.

Kahn Building galleries

Moderated by Eric M. Lee, director

Saturday, October 20, 2018 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Moderated by George T. M. Shackelford, deputy director

Saturday, December 1, 2018 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Moderated by Claire Barry, director of conservation

Saturday, January 12, 2019 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Symposia & Inaugural Lectures

Inaugural lectures, panel discussions, and daylong symposia featuring leading experts from all over the world launch the opening of the Museum’s special exhibitions.

Free; seating is limited. No reservations required. Priority admission reserved for Kimbell members who present a current membership card at least twenty minutes before the program begins.

Piano Auditorium

Saturday, October 6, 2018 – 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Saturday, February 9, 2019 – 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

State of the Arts

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 6 pm

Trailblazers: Fort Worth’s Emerging Creative Class

Fort Worth is now the youngest city in the state of Texas—and you can feel a buzz all over the place. A new generation is reinventing neighborhoods with repurposed venues and innovative approaches to everything from retail design, film, public art, cuisine, and even curated events. Meet some of the trailblazers who are embracing our city’s traditions—its world-class arts organizations and unique western heritage—but adding their own spin, and, along the way, reshaping our ideas about culture. After the discussion, continue the conversation at a reception in the Pavilion Lobby presented by Visit Fort Worth.

Susan Gruppi and Jessica Miller, M2G Ventures

Jonathan Morris, Fort Worth Barber Shop

Red Sanders, Red Productions

Noel and Sara Viramontes, Blackhouse

 

ARTMinded Podcast

Art Minded Podcast logo from the iTunes Store

The Kimbell Art Museum presents “ARTMinded,” a free podcast produced by the Museum that offers new perspectives on the works in the Museum’s permanent collection and special exhibitions. Each episode will provide unusual viewpoints that enhance and sometimes even challenge customary engagement with artworks.

The inaugural season of “ARTMinded” begins with a series of guided meditations produced in collaboration with Elemental Yoga and the Mind Arts. Designed to be enjoyed by meditation experts and novices alike, each fifteen-minute guided meditation focuses on a work of art in the special exhibition From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection. Buddhist icons and Tibetan mandalas come alive before the viewer as Elemental Yoga takes the listener on a journey to deep, mindful relaxation with illustrative visualizations and breathing techniques.

Please click on the links below to download the podcast:
Apple Store
Google Play

 

Artful Readings

SELECTED FRIDAY EVENINGS, 5:30–7 PM

Participants explore connections in the literary and visual arts through group discussions and special presentations on selected books. Includes wine and light refreshments, as well as a 20% discount on Artful Readings selections in the Museum Shop.

To register or to be placed on a waitlist, please call 817-332-8451, ext. 351, or email edassist@kimbellmuseum.org. Pricing information is listed below.

  • Single session for nonmembers: $20
  • Single session for members: $16
  • Series of three for nonmembers: $50
  • Series of three for members: $40

Artful Reading programs

 

View the full listing of the Kimbell’s upcoming Lectures & Discussions

Meadows Museum News, Exhibitions, and Lectures

Amanda W. Dotseth Appointed Curator 

Following a six-month national and international search, the Meadows Museum, SMU has appointed Dr. Amanda W. Dotseth to the position of curator. An accomplished scholar, Dotseth conducts research that is grounded in the Spanish Middle Ages, but has addressed a wide range of topics, including architecture, panel painting and the history of collecting. Dotseth is currently completing a Meadows/Mellon/Prado postdoctoral fellowship at the museum; she will begin her new role as curator on September 19, 2018. During the two years of her fellowship, Dotseth has curated or co-curated exhibitions such asZurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle; Chillida in Dallas: De Música at the Meyerson; and At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase. She also coordinated the first colloquium of current and former Meadows/Prado fellows and organized a symposium on medieval Spanish art featuring internationally recognized scholars in the field.

Meadows Museum Director Mark A. Roglán stated, “We are thrilled to have Dr. Dotseth join the Meadows Museum staff, bringing her passion for scholarship on Spanish art to us on a long-term basis. We know from experience that Amanda’s curatorial eye has enhanced the museum’s work on many projects. Looking to the future, she will be an invaluable asset in helping us identify acquisitions, cultivating partnerships and supporters, and serving as an advocate for the museum both within and outside Dallas.”

“I take pride in the long relationship I have had with the Meadows Museum and its staff. I remain invested in the success of the institution, which, like me, has grown and diversified significantly since my tenure as assistant curator,” said Dotseth, referring to her history with the museum beginning with her very first role at the Meadows more than ten years ago. “I am deeply impressed with the expansion of the Meadows’s collection, as well as its ambitious scholarly collaborations, recruitment of talented staff, and commitment to establishing itself as a premier center for the study of Spanish art. There is still much to be done, and so I welcome the opportunity to help shape the Meadows’s future.”

Amanda Dotseth completed her PhD at the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2015 with a dissertation titled, “San Quirce de Burgos: Reframing Romanesque Architecture in Castile.” During her doctoral studies, she also served as a pre-doctoral fellow at the Spanish National Research Council in Madrid. Dotseth completed her MA at SMU in 2006, after which she served for three years as the assistant curator at the Meadows Museum, where she curated numerous exhibitions and was instrumental in the research project, exhibition and catalogue Fernando Gallego and His Workshop: The Altarpiece from Ciudad Rodrigo. During that period, Dotseth helped to secure funding for a number of important acquisitions—including works by Jaume Plensa, George Rickey, María Blanchard and Martín Rico y Ortega—and collaborated on the reinstallation of the museum’s permanent collection galleries and sculpture garden.

Currently an associated scholar for the project “The Medieval Treasury across Frontiers and Generations: The Kingdom of León-Castile in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange,” funded by a Spanish National Grant, Dotseth has received numerous grants and awards for her research on medieval Spanish art. She previously held a Fulbright fellowship and received the British Archaeological Association’s Ochs Scholarship, among other awards, in support of her dissertation research in Spain.

 

Salvador Dalí (Spanish, 1904–1989), Aliyah, plate 1, from Aliyah, 1968. Lithograph on Arches paper. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum purchase thanks to a gift from Linda P. and William A. Custard and The Meadows Foundation in tribute to the Honorable Janet Pollman Kafka, Honorary Consul of Spain, for her twenty years of service, MM.2017.02.20. © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society. Photo by Kevin Todora

Exhibitions

 

Dalí: Poetics of the Small,1929–1936

Sep. 9–Dec. 9, 2018

 

Dalí’s Aliyah: A Moment in Jewish History

Sep. 9, 2018–Jan. 13, 2019

 

Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration

Through Dec. 2, 2018

 

Events

Concert: Lazos sobre el Atlantic/Ties Over the Atlantic

Oct. 18, 6:30 pm

Meadows Museum

 

Film: Rafael Azcona’s The Executioner

Oct. 25, 6:00 pm

Meadows Museum

 

Concert: The Great Stravinsky: An Evening of Chamber Music

Nov. 15, 6:30 pm

Meadows Museum

 

Performance: Dalí Interactive

Dec. 1, 10:00 am-5:00 pm

Meadows Museum

 

 

 

 

Lectures

 

Lecture Series: Salvador Dalí and the Resurgence of Surrealism

Sep. 21-Oct. 26, 10:30 am

Josh Rose

Meadows Museum

 

 

 

Gallery Talk: Artful Conversations

Oct. 16, 2:00 pm

Scott Winterrowd & Anne Kindseth

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Dalí, Surrealism, and Psychoanalysis

Oct. 26, 12:15 pm

Anna Lovatt

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Dalí and the Surrealist Moment

Nov. 8, 6:00 pm

William Jeffett

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: The Meadows in Contemporary Painting

Nov. 9, 12:15 pm

Francisco Moreno

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Artful Conversations

Nov. 13, 2:00 pm

Scott Winterrowd & Anne Kindseth

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Salvador Dalí’s Techniques and Studio Practice in Panel Painting

Nov. 17, 10:30AM to 12:00PM

Irene Civil & Claire Barry

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Small Charms: Dalí and Poetry

Dec. 7, 12:15 pm

Anne Keefe

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Artful Conversations

Dec. 11, 2:00 pm

Scott Winterrowd & Anne Kindseth

Meadows Museum

Nasher Sculpture Center Exhibition

The Nature of Arp
Jean (Hans) Arp, Human Concentration, 1934
Marble, 13 ¼ x 16 x 15 ½ in. (33.7 x 40.6 x 39.4 cm)
© 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

The Nature of Arp

September 15, 2018 – January 6, 2019

The Nature of Arp provides a long-overdue look at the achievements of Jean (Hans) Arp (1886-1966), one of the most important and multifaceted artists of the modern era.  As a founder of the international Dada movement during World War I, Arp pioneered the use of chance, spontaneity, and collaboration as artistic processes and subsequently developed a vocabulary of curving, organic forms that was to become the lingua franca for several generations of artists.  Arp’s sculptures, begun in the early 1930s, often have no use for a pedestal, can be turned in different orientations, and seem to pulse with incipient life. In later years, he put his sculptures through complex processes of fragmentation, casting, recasting, and enlarging. 

Bringing together more than 80 objects, including sculptures, reliefs, collages, drawings, textiles, and books, The Nature of Arp will include works drawn from prominent U.S. and European museums, foundations, and private collections. Organized by the Nasher Sculpture Center, the exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue including essays by several authors, including Catherine Craft, Nasher Curator and curator of the exhibition. The Nature of Arp  is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and by the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia.

TRACY HICKS: COLLECT PRESERVE CHANGE at UTD SP/N Gallery

TRACY HICKS

COLLECT   PRESERVE   CHANGE

September 4 – November 10, 2018

The fall, the University of Texas at Dallas’s SP/N Gallery hosts a retrospective of noted Dallas artist Tracy Hicks (1946- 2014). The show looks at a lifetime of art intersecting with science through making, collecting, documentating, creative partnerships, and innovative visual adaptations.

A maverick in his creative research pursuits, Hicks was chosen to participate in one of the early rounds of artists at the renown Project Row House in Houston  along with Fred Wilson and Shahazia Sikander. This was followed by a collaboration with Rick Lowe in his Mobile Media Lab on a photo archive of Houston’s Third Ward.

Tracy Hicks showed opposite Damien Hirst at the DMA in 1994. In 2010 Hicks was one of the first artists selected for a coveted Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship (SARF), established to bring together Smithsonian scientific experts and “outstanding visual artists.”

Hicks saw art as “a structural framework that parallels science, sometimes incorporating objective knowledge but grounded in subjective interpretations that leave room for irrational possibilities and whims.” 

He described himself as “an archivist guided by visceral impulses in exploring our ever-changing human landscape, both physically and conceptually. I create archives and then dig into them (as well as archives created by others) to constantly interpret and reinterpret the substance of reality.”

There is much to see in this 20-year retrospective. The exhibition includes Hicks’s major works: Freedman’s Field, Darwin, and Third Ward Archive. It is an opportunity to experience the art and world of this significant artist.

The exhibition runs through Nov. 10 in the UTD SP/N Gallery.

The University of Texas at Dallas

SP/N Gallery

3020 Stewart Dr.

Richardson, TX 75080

Gallery Hours

Tues, Wed, Sat 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Thurs & Friday 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Dallas Museum of Art Exhibitions

Günther Förg, Untitled, 2005, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Dr. Ramiro del Amo, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018; Günther Förg, Stairwell, Munich, 1984/1998, color photograph, Deutsche Bank Collection, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018; Günther Förg, Untitled, 2009, acrylic on canvas, private collection, courtesy of Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

First U.S. Museum Exhibition of Work by Günther Förg in Nearly Three Decades Will Debut at the Dallas Museum of Art in October 2018

The Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) announced its presentation of the most comprehensive survey to date for renowned German artist Günther Förg (1952-2013), opening on October 21, 2018 and on view through January 27, 2019. The first American museum exhibition dedicated to the artist in nearly three decades, Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty, brings together over 40 years of  the artist’s multimedia practice – including work on paper, photography, sculpture, and rarely-exhibited late-career paintings –  to provide new insight on the practice and enduring influence of this extraordinary and complex artist.

Organized in collaboration with the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam and their curator of photography Hripsimé Visser, in close dialogue with the artist’s estate, Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty builds on both institutions’ histories with the artist, with each having staged seminal exhibitions of his work in 1992 and 1995 respectively. The exhibition includes major loans from private collections and notable German institutions such as the Städel Museum, Frankfurt and the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, Munich.

Read more from the DMA

 

On View at the DMA

 

Paris at the Turn of the Century

Through May 27, 2018

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Laura Owens

March 25 to July 29, 2018

Hoffman Galleries

 

The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana

April 15 to August 12, 2018

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty

Opens October 21, 2018

 

Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit

Through December 2, 2018

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road

Through December 9, 2018

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery

Through April 26, 2020

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

DMA Arts & Letters Live                               

Caroline Weber  

May 30, 7:30 pm

Acclaimed author, French literature professor, and fashion historian, Dr. Caroline Weber returns to French high society with Proust’s Duchess: How Three Celebrated Women Captured the Imagination of Fin de Siècle Paris. 

 

Clemantine Wamariya

June 20, 7:30 pm

Human rights advocate Clemantine Wamariya captures the personal aftershocks of war, displacement, and survival in her powerful memoir The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After.

Amon Carter Museum of American Art Exhibitions, Lectures, Events

Jan Staller (b. 1952)
Still from SAVED, 2013
Single-channel video
Courtesy of the artist

Jan Staller: CYCLE & SAVED

Through August 19

These two short videos by New York photographer-videographer Jan Staller reflect on a potent contradiction of contemporary material life. Where CYCLE revels in the powerful abstracting of paper traveling at high speed down a conveyor belt on its first step to being recycled, SAVED is a playful celebration of hundreds of small tools and toys accumulated over the years by the artist. 

Together these videos ask us to reflect on what we choose to keep and what we throw away.

In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

Through June 17

Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows 

Through July 22

Commanding Space: Women Sculptors of Texas

Through November 18

Lectures and Talks

A Conversation with Texas Women Sculptors

May 31, 2018, 6:30 pm

 

Lecture: Who is Dave Heath?

June 16, 2018, 2:00 p.m.

 

Films + Performances

 

Sunset Cinema: Steel Magnolias

May 24, 2018, 6:00 pm 

 

Sunset Cinema: Homeward Bound

July 12, 2018, 6:00 pm

 

Interactive Programs

 

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

May 24, 2018, 4:00 pm–8:00 pm

July 19, 2018, 4:00 pm–8:00 pm

Sep 20, 2018, 4:00 pm–8:00 pm

 

Crafting from the Collection

June 2, 2018, 10:30 am

 

Book Club: Reconstructing Amelia

June 7, 2018, 6:00 pm

 

Trivia Night

June 18, 2018, 6:00 pm

 

Visit the Amon Carter museum website for more information and to register for programs online.

Crow Collection of Asian Art Updates, Exhibitions, and Programs

The year 2018 will bring major changes to the Crow Collection of Asian Art as the museum undergoes a multi-million-dollar expansion – including a new gallery, reimagined Lotus Shop, interactive “street-side” art studio and Center for Contemplative Leadership. Upon completion of the construction in October, the nonprofit organization will launch its next chapter as the Crow Museum of Asian Art, a name that reflects not only the breadth of the collection and programming but also the museum’s wide and diverse community support.

Read more for details on these exciting new developments

Exhibitions

Earthly Splendor: Korean Ceramics from the Collection

(through Sunday, September 9, 2018)

Outstanding examples of contemporary Korean ceramics paired with historical Korean ceramics from the museum’s permanent collection to highlight the material, aesthetic, stylistic, and technical developments of Korean ceramics throughout history.

Fierce Loyalty: A Samurai Complete

(Ongoing)

Exquisitely crafted and perfectly preserved samurai suit of armor worn by Abe Masayoshi (1700-1769), Lord of Fukuyama Fiefdom in the Edo period (1603–1868).

Current Programs

May 22 – SOLUNA Master Shen-Long 

June 1 – Stay Calm and Cool This Summer, The Ayurveda Way

Weekday Wellness Classes at the Crow Collection. Every weekday from noon-5pm.

Monthly Breathe: Art and Wellness Workshops for veterans and first responders

 

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Exhibitions

 

From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection
MARCH 4–AUGUST 19, 2018

When Sam Myers was sent to Paris by his law firm in the mid-1960s, he and his wife Myrna became so enamored with the city that they decided to make it their home. There, over the course of 50 years, they built an extraordinary collection that until now has never been exhibited publicly in the United States. Beginning by acquiring Greek and Roman antiquities but eventually focusing on Asia, the Myers assembled some 5,000 works that offer a very personal vision of the world of Asian art. This exhibition will present over 400 objects selected from this remarkable collection, with works representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam.

The exhibition covers a broad historical range, from the Neolithic era to the 20th century. The objects are also highly varied in nature, from porcelain, ivory, and precious stones such as jade and rock crystal to Buddhist art and textiles and stunning costumes from Central Asia, Tibet, China and Japan. Each treasure is exceptional in its shape, rarity, quality, function or inherent message. The exhibition recounts fascinating historical events through themes such as the symbolism of Chinese jade, the trade in blue-and-white porcelain, Buddhism, Noh theater, the Japanese samurai, the tea ceremony, the art of writing and the place of women. The astonishing array of outstanding works of art in the Myers collection is testimony to Asia’s rich cultural heritage and unique customs and offers a broad panorama of Asian history in all its beauty and diversity.

This exhibition is produced by Pointe-à-Callière, Montréal Archaeology and History Complex, Montréal, Canada, in partnership with Sam Myers.

 

Lectures

 

Friday Evening Lectures

SELECTED FRIDAYS, 6 pm

Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held thorought the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art.  Free; no reservations required. Seating is limited.Pavillion Auditorium.

 

Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond

MAY 11

Lee Talbot, curator, Eastern Hemisphere Collections, The George Washington University and The Textile Museum, Washington, DC.

 

From Workshop to Grave: Ancient Chinese Jades

Friday, July 13, 2018 – 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

J. Keith Wilson, curator of ancient Chinese art, Freer/Sackler, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

 

 

Education Events and Activities

 

Family Festival: Passport to Asia / Pasaporte a Asia

Sunday, June 3, 2018 – 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

 

Film Series

SELECTED SUNDAYS, 2 pm

Comprehensive film programs focusing on artists’ careers, major art movements, and important cultural figures provide rich visual and historical context that complement artworks on view.Kahn Auditorium

High Art of the Low Countries

May 27, June 24, July 1

In this sweeping production, British art historian and broadcaster Andrew Graham-Dixon explores the art of the Low Countries. Examining the formation of a ground-breaking school of painting by artists such as Jan van Eyck and Hieronymus Bosch, Graham-Dixon then turns to the prosperous Dutch Golden Age of the seventeenth century that fostered the careers of Rembrandt van Rijn, Johannes Vermeer, and others. In the modern age, the Low Countries once again produced important forward-thinking artists, including Vincent van Gogh and Piet Mondrian.

 

The Art of Japanese Life & Handmade in Japan

July 8, July 15, July 22, July 29

Explore the vibrant art and culture of Japan in two recent series from the BBC. In The Art of Japanese Life, Dr. James Fox examines how three core themes—nature, the city, and the home— have manifested in Japanese art and life through the centuries. Handmade in Japan follows contemporary artisans’ intricate production of traditional Japanese crafts: the Samurai sword, the kimono, and Mingei pottery. Offered in conjunction with the special exhibition From the Lands of Asia.

 

 

 

Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, and Lectures

Exhibitions

Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida 

Through Jun. 3, 2018

Eduardo Chillida (1924-2002) is one of the major sculptors of the post-war international art movement. His monumental public works can be found throughout Spain, Europe and the Americas. Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida presents 66 works of sculpture, drawing, collage, gravitations, graphic works, and a small selection of artists’ books, representing a general view of the mature phase of this key sculptor of the post-war avant-garde.

 

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase with funds from Mary Anne Cree, Mrs. Eugene McDermott, Susan Heldt Albritton, Linda P. and William A. Custard, Gwen and Richard Irwin, Shirley and Bill McIntyre, Cyrena Nolan, Peggy and Carl Sewell, Gene and Jerry Jones, Pilar and Jay Henry, Barbara and Mike McKenzie, Caren Prothro, Marilyn Augur, Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Barzune, Diane and Stuart Bumpas, The Honorable Janet Kafka and Mr. Terry Kafka, the Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Levy Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas, Stacey and Nicholas McCord, Linda and John McFarland, Catherine Blaffer Taylor, Julie and George Tobolowsky, Cheryl and Kevin Vogel, Diane and Gregory Warden, Natalie and George Lee, Estelle and Michael Thomas, Bethany and Samuel Holland, President R. Gerald and Gail Turner, Kathleen and Mark Roglán, and an Anonymous Donor. MM.2017.03. Photo by Robert LaPrelle

At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase 

Jun. 24-Sep. 23, 2018

The Meadows Museum, SMU, has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874). The nearly finished painting—which is unusual for its large scale, relative to much of the artist’s work—depicts the enjoyment of a summer day at the beach, and demonstrates Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint. Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as the particularly American provenance of this work reveals. Reflecting the high esteem in which Fortuny’s works were held, Beach at Portici was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Considered one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century, these works were selected to show off to the Fair’s wide audiences— more than 27 million people visited during its six-month run—the richness and breadth of paintings owned by American collectors and museums, and implicitly, American economic prowess, and refined taste in fine art.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase, where it will be paired with a loan from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Chase’s Idle Hours (c. 1894). The Spanish artist had a significant impact on many important American artists and perhaps especially on Chase, who knew his work well and greatly admired it.

Read more about “At the Beach”

Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration 

Through Dec. 2, 2018

 

Events

Family Program: A Day at the Beach

Jun. 23, 10:00 am

 

Lectures

Lecture Series: Light, Camera, Landscape: The Rise of International Impressionism

May 31-Jun. 14, 6:00-7:30 pm

Nancy Cohen Israel

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase

Jun. 28, 6:00 pm

Mark A. Roglán and Andrew Walker

Meadows Museum

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

Kamrooz Aram
Blue Backdrop for Minor Arts, 2018
Panel: oil an pencil on linen; Pedestal: oil on mdf, brass, terrazzo; ceramic
Overall: 50 1/4 × 9 × 9 in. Pedestal. Unframed: 48 × 66 × 2 in.Panel
Courtesy of the Artist and Green Art Gallery, Dubai
Image copyright: Photograph by Kevin Todora.

FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram

Mar 31, 2018 – Jun 17, 2018
Spanning painting, sculpture, collage, and installation, Kamrooz Aram’s work investigates the complex relationship between Western modernism and classical non-Western art. By highlighting their formal connections, he reveals the typically downplayed role that non-Western art and design have played in the development of modernism and its drive toward abstraction. Challenging the traditionally Euro-centric narrative established by art history, Aram’s work sets forth to disrupt this perceived hierarchy by merging and equalizing Western and non-Western forms. The artist will present all new work for this exhibition.

 More information on FOCUS

 

Takashi Murakami
Flower Ball (Lots of Colors), 2008
Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board
59 in. (150 cm) diameter
Cari and Michael J. Sacks © 2008 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Image copyright: Photo: Nathan Keay

TAKASHI MURAKAMI: THE OCTOPUS EATS ITS OWN LEG

Jun 10, 2018 – Sep 16, 2018

Known for his collaborations with pop icon Kanye West and fashion house Louis Vuitton, and for vibrant anime-inspired characters, Japanese artist Takashi Murakami (b. 1962) has blurred the boundaries throughout his career between high and low culture, ancient and modern, East and West. Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the exhibition is a major retrospective of his paintings, featuring fifty works that span three decades of his career, from the artist’s earliest mature works to his recent, monumentally scaled paintings. The exhibition, titled Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg, shows how Murakami’s art is rooted in traditions of Japanese painting and folklore, and highlights the artist’s careful attention to craft and materials. It also showcases the artist’s astute eye for the contemporary influences of globalization, media culture, the continued threats of nuclear power.

More information on the exhibition

Nasher Sculpture Center Exhibitions and Events

Exhibitions

The Nature of Arp
September 15, 2018 – January 6, 2019
The first major North American museum exhibition in three decades
The Nature of Arp provides a long-overdue look at the achievements of Jean (Hans) Arp (1886-1966), one of the most important and multifaceted artists of the modern era.  As a founder of the international Dada movement during World War I, Arp pioneered the use of chance, spontaneity, and collaboration as artistic processes and subsequently developed a vocabulary of curving, organic forms that was to become the lingua franca for several generations of artists.  Arp’s sculptures, begun in the early 1930s, often have no use for a pedestal, can be turned in different orientations, and seem to pulse with incipient life. In later years, he put his sculptures through complex processes of fragmentation, casting, recasting, and enlarging. Almost alone among artists of his generation, Arp worked at the forefront of abstraction as well as the Dada and Surrealist movements.  The Nature of Arp will present a compelling new look at an artist whose experimental approach to creation, radical rethinking of traditional art forms, and collaborative proclivities resonate with the wide-ranging character of art today. Bringing together more than 80 objects, including sculptures, reliefs, collages, drawings, textiles, and books, The Nature of Arp will include works drawn from prominent U.S. and European museums, foundations, and private collections. Organized by the Nasher Sculpture Center, the exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue including essays by several authors, including Catherine Craft, Nasher Curator and curator of the exhibition. The Nature of Arp is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and by the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia.

The Nature of Arp
Jean (Hans) Arp, Human Concentration, 1934
Marble, 13 ¼ x 16 x 15 ½ in. (33.7 x 40.6 x 39.4 cm)
© 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Sightings: Anne Le Troter
October 27, 2018 – February 19, 2019
Artist’s first U.S. commission will consider ethics of eugenics in a linguistic score and site-specific installation
As part of the Nasher Sculpture Center’s Sightings series of smaller-scale exhibitions and installations that highlight new work of emerging or established artists, the Nasher will present Sightings: Anne Le Troter in the fall of 2018. For this commission, Le Troter is developing a sound piece based on her research on fertility tourism and the history of sperm banks in the U.S., where the lack of governmental regulation has resulted in the rise of so-called “designer babies”—children whose genetic makeup can be preselected based on the characteristics of the donor. In the artist’s home country of France, donor conception is arranged exclusively by the state via 23 state owned centers for the study and conservation of human eggs and sperm. There, both sperm and egg donations are entirely anonymous and French law prohibits sharing any identifying information about the donor or recipient. The U.S. is one of the few places in the world where recipients can review the profiles of potential sperm and egg donors before making a selection and many banks also provide audio recordings that describe donors’ physical characteristics, personalities, and intelligence. As part of her research, Le Troter signed up as a customer at a cryobank based in Virginia where she gained access to over 400 donor audio recordings. For the Nasher exhibition, Le Troter will splice together and layer excerpts of the original recordings to create a linguistic score reminiscent of and inspired by such science fiction novels as Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985). Titled Anticipation, Le Troter’s sound piece considers the ethics of eugenics as well as the dystopic future of state regulated vs. free market fertility. Sightings: Anne Le Troter is the artist’s first U.S. commission and will be Le Troter’s first work in the English language. For an excerpt of Le Troter’s Anticipation currently in progress, please follow this link: https://soundcloud.com/user359763335/anticipation-anne-le-troter

Lectures and Events

May 17/ 9 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Grubnik + Suzanne

Presented by SOLUNA

Jeff Gibbons and Gregory Ruppe, two of Dallas’s most respected creators, present the world premiere of their artwork Grubnik + Suzanne.

Experience this immersive installation, which includes a performative element by vocal artist Liz Tonne, and utilizes sound technology invented by the artists to present a psychologically charged experience.

Open to the public.

FREE with RSVP.

RSVP to nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

May 18 / 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

‘til Midnight at the Nasher

Julie Byrne and Vagabon

A music-playing nomad, Julie Byrne has toured the world. Her vast amount of experience lends a credibility to her stark take on 1970s-era song craft that stands out from most acoustic-based folk singers.

The Cameroon-born singer/songwriter—aka Laetitia Tamko–had a breakout year in 2017 and recently enjoyed an appearance on NPR’s popular Tiny Desk concert series.

Open to the public.

FREE admission.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/til-midnight

 

May 24  / 6 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Workshop: Sound Off

Immerse yourself in artist Luke Fowler’s site-specific sound installation in the Nasher Garden. Then get ready to turn up the volume as we compose an original soundscape inspired by our surroundings. This workshop is designed for adults ages 17+. Learn something new, have a snack and get creative.

Open to the public.

FREE for Members.

$10 for Non-members.

Advance registration required.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

June 2 / 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Target First Saturdays

Bring the kids and enjoy FREE admission and fun family programming on the first Saturday of every month.

Big Idea: Collecting

Art Project: Collection Collage

FREE Admission 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Family Activities 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

June 2 – August 11

Mayor’s Summer Reading Challenge

Both reading and art can take your imagination on wonderful journeys. This summer the Nasher invites you to create a work of art that you can keep with you while you read. Pick up an entry form at the Nasher or your local Dallas Public Library branch. Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/learn

 

June 11 – 15 / 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., daily

Nasher Sculpture Center

Nasher Kids Camp

Have you got design on your mind? Have you seen it on a sign? Design is everywhere, in what we use and what we wear. Spend a week at our place and design your own space. We will learn as we play, with a new theme every day.

Open to students who have completed 1st – 5th grade in 2018.

Members $125. Non-Members $150.

Registration deadline is May 18.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/learn

 

June 9 / 9 – 11 a.m.

Dallas Zoo

Kids Club: Dallas Zoo

Enjoy a morning of family-friendly art-making at the Dallas Zoo, a Kids Club partner institution.

Open to Members at the Moore Circle ($125) and above. Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/member-events.

 

June 15 / 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

‘til Midnight at the Nasher
This Will Destroy You: Performing S/T and Young Mountain in their entirety
 (San Marcos, TX/Los Angeles): Long-running instrumentalists This Will Destroy You will celebrate the tenth anniversary of their eponymous 2008 studio album by performing their record in its entirety. The band will also play the coveted Young Mountain record in full.

Open to the public.

FREE admission.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/til-midnight

 

 

 

June 25 – 29 / 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., daily

Nasher Sculpture Center

Nasher Summer Institute for Teens

Meet other students who love art, work with artists and get advice from professionals in the art community.

Teachers may nominate students who have completed 9-12th grade in 2018.

FREE for selected students.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/learn

REGISTRATION IS FULL FOR THIS PROGRAM

 

July 4

Independence Day / Museum Closed

 

July 7 / 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Target First Saturdays

Bring the kids and enjoy free admission and fun family programming on the first Saturday of every month.

Big Idea: Construction

Art Project: Build-it Boxes

FREE Admission 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Family Activities 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

July 9 – 13 / 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., daily

Museum Forum for Teachers:

Modern and Contemporary Art

Museum Forum is an immersive weeklong summer program for educators presented by The Warehouse, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas Museum of Art, Kimbell Art Museum, and Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

$250 tuition includes all instruction, materials, and lunch each day.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/learn

 

July 18, 19 or 20 / 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Destination Dallas Summer Architecture Workshop

Join architect and educator Peter Goldstein, AIA for an exciting one-day look at the intersection of natural and built environments in the Dallas Arts District.

Open to students who have completed 8th – 12th grade in 2018.

FREE Admission.

Registration deadline is May 31.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/learn

 

July 20 / 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

‘til Midnight at the Nasher

Julianna Barwick (New York) with Mary Lattimore (Los Angeles): 

Combining two ancient aspects of music—the voice and the harp, respectively—with contemporary technology, Julianna Barwick and Mary Lattimore are noted for their unusual approach to looping effects. Barwick has stunned audiences worldwide with a sound that’s been described by the New York Times as “churchly and vaguely Renaissance, but also very now.” The sight of Lattimore’s Lyon and Healy Concert Grand harp taking the stage is a spectacle unto itself.

Open to the public.

FREE Admission.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/til-midnight

 

August 4 / 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Target First Saturdays

Bring the kids and enjoy free admission and fun family programming on the first Saturday of every month.

Big Idea: Process

Art Project: Process Postcards

FREE Admission 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Family Activities 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

August 17 / 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

‘til Midnight at the Nasher

Tess Roby (Montreal):

Tess Roby’s live act includes her brother Eliot Roby on guitar. Having premiered her “Ballad 5” single on the influential Dallas music website Gorilla vs Bear last May, Tess Roby is embarking on her first headlining tour this year. Roby’s single was released by Italians Do It Better, the internationally-acclaimed record label that has had a significant impact on the synthesizer-heavy sound of both dance music and soundtracks of the past decade.

Open to the public.

FREE Admission.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/til-midnight

 

 

August 25 / 2 p.m.

360: Speaker Series

Tauba Auerbach, Artist

San Francisco-born, New York-based artist Tauba Auerbach has described her work as an attempt to reveal “new spectral and dimensional richness… both within and beyond the limits of perception.”

Open to the public.

FREE with admission.

FREE for Members and students.

RSVP to nashersculpturecenter.org/360

Watch 360 Speaker Series videos at nashersc.org/360archive

 

September 1 / 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Target First Saturdays

Bring the kids and enjoy free admission and fun family programming on the first Saturday of every month.

Big Idea: Family

Art Project: Family Frames

FREE Admission 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Family Activities 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

September 8 / 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Workshop: Ice, Ice Baby

Have your cake and eat it too as we create edible art in the medium of frosting. Join a renowned pastry chef for a lesson in icing techniques let your palate guide your palette.

This workshop is designed for adults ages 17+. Learn something new, eat some cake and get creative.

Open to the public.

FREE for Members.

$10 for Non-members.

Advance registration required.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

September 13 / 6:30 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Patron Dinner

The Nature of Arp

Join us for a cocktail reception and exhibition viewing, followed by the annual Patron Dinner, held in celebration of the opening of The Nature of Arp.

Open to Members at the Brancusi Circle ($2,500) and above. RSVP to 214.242.5152 or to patron@nashersculpturecenter.org.

 

September 14 / 7 – 9 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Member Preview

The Nature of Arp

Explore The Nature of Arp before it opens to the public. Join us for a Members-exclusive exhibition preview and reception.

Open to all Members. RSVP to 214.242.5154 or to memberevents@nashersculpturecenter.org.

 

 

September 15

Nasher Sculpture Center

360: Speaker Series

The Nature of Arp Symposium

Join us on opening weekend of The Nature of Arp for a thoughtful discussion about the work of one of the most important and multifaceted artists of the modern era.

Open to the public.

FREE with admission.

FREE for Members and students.

RSVP to nashersculpturecenter.org/360

Watch 360 Speaker Series videos at nashersc.org/360archive

 

September 21 / 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

‘til Midnight at the Nasher

CCFX (Olympia, Washington):

A new super-group hailing from Olympia, Washington, CCFX is the result of a merger between two Olympia pop music outfits, CC Dust and Trans FX. On their debut self-titled EP, artists Chris McDonnell, Mirče Popovic, Mary Jane Dunphe and David Jaques offer a record that is at once a showcase and aberration of what is currently coming out of the Pacific Northwest.

Open to the public.

FREE Admission.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/til-midnight

 

September 22 / 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Workshop: This Bud’s for You

Plant yourself among the organic forms of artist Jean Arp, who was inspired by the organic growth of buds bursting from a tree and the curves of living bodies. Enjoy a guided discussion in the galleries then become a budding artist by creating your own biomorphic artwork. This workshop is designed for adults ages 17+. Learn something new, have a snack and get creative.

Open to the public.

FREE for Members.

$10 for Non-members.

Advance registration required.

Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/engage

 

September 29 / 9 – 11 a.m.

Nasher Sculpture Center

Kids Club: Nasher Sculpture Center

Enjoy a morning of family-friendly art-making led by North Texas artists, guided tours, a scavenger hunt, and more at the Nasher.

Open to Members at the Moore Circle ($125) and above. Learn more at nashersculpturecenter.org/member-events.

The Warehouse Presents Topologies

Nobuo Sekine; Phase No. 10, 1968; wood, oil-based paint, and F.R.P.; Dallas Museum of Art and The Rachofsky Collection

Topologies

Curated by Mika Yoshitake

The Warehouse

May 14 – December 28, 2018

Felix Gonzalez-Torres once said, “How do you reinvent—how do you deactivate—a space? How do you use space in ways that are subtly subversive, or subtly altering?” This provocation paved the way for his participatory and relational practice that interrogated the conditions of existence by activating the politics and poetics of space. This activation is a key notion of topology (“logic of place”) in the arts, a theory of spatial transformation in which space can be expanded, contracted, distorted and twisted, yet the structure itself remains invariable. Taking this formal definition as a launching point, the term denotes a field of semantic and sensory relations where one’s movement, rather than the static object itself, constitutes the “work.” A turn from the fixed structures of Euclidean geometry and empiricism, topology instead incorporates a breakdown of boundaries, open structures, or a crossing of disciplines that question systems of knowledge. Historically, these transformations range from surrealist encounters between found objects and the scientific world, gravity and entropy, to post-minimalist strategies of duration and process where artists conveyed the body and materials in-formation or in de-formation in order to explore multidirectional experiences of space.

The poetic interpretation of topology in the late 1960s as a source of inspiration for artists is internationally contemporaneous. In Japan, the idea was interpreted through a physics of form and foundational to Mono-ha’s breakthrough land art piece in 1968, Phase-Mother Earth.This work, by artist Nobuo Sekine, operates on a continuous renewal of perception through a cycle of creation and recreation. In the U.S. the idea was introduced into art criticism by Dan Graham in his seminal essay, “Subject Matter” (1969) defined as “a constant process of spatial warp…” where agency is given to objects in which “our visual field, itself in the process of alteration, shifts in a topology of expansion, contraction, or skew.”

Gathering roughly 100 works between 1952 and 2014 by seventy artists, Topologies cuts across time both diachronically and synchronically and draws from The Rachofsky Collection’s strong formal and conceptual emphases on works that integrate process and materiality. Each gallery presents topological themes that range from permutations and distortions in spatial dimension; inverses and shifts in the body’s phenomenological relationship to space; material transition based on gravity and entropy; politics of displacement; and reconceiving abject encounters between the synthetic and organic (speculative realism). These will be considered in terms of comparative, morphological, and synthetic methods of inquiry in the catalogue.

Reading Room Exhibition

to Further Seasons

to Further Seasons, a group exhibition of unusual images and texts about nature, curated by artist, writer and curator Lucia Simek, will open April 28 at The ReadingRoom and continue through June 9.

The exhibition will include visual material from Jesse Morgan Barnett, Cassandra Emswiler Burd, Trevor Davis, Michael Dean, Erika Duque, Ian Hamilton Findlay, Jen Porembski, Marjorie Schwarz and Myron Stout, as well as works by unknown artists. The interplay of visual and textual materials will explore ideas of fecundity, blossoming, pollination, scientific exploration, horticulture, wizardry, danger and beauty.

Visit the Reading Room website or contact Karen Weiner 214.952.4109

Dallas Museum of Art News and Exhibitions

New Year, NICE Numbers
The DMA began the new year with a record-setting end to 2017. In calendar year 2017, 882,451 people visited the Museum, a 25% increase over last year, marking the best calendar year yet since returning to free general admission in January 2013. In July we announced that the DMA had ended its 2017 fiscal year with its highest attendance in a decade, and the second highest in the Museum’s history. The Museum welcomed 802,870 visitors in FY 2017, with the landmark presentation of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde drawing more than 125,000 visitors, and making Eugene McDermott Director Dr. Agustín Arteaga’s first anniversary a truly happy one.

Vision Seeking
The year 2018 also began with the opening of Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit, curated by Dr. Kimberly L. Jones. A wonderful example of the DMA’s continued commitment to presenting diverse cultures and the best art each creates, the DMA is honored to be the first location outside of the Museum of Northern Arizona to show the impressive mural by Hopi artists Michael Kabotie and Delbridge Honanie. This beautiful work depicts the history of the Hopi people and is accompanied by significant works from the DMA’s collection, from ancient to contemporary. Ed Kabotie, Michael’s son, was in Dallas for the opening week of the exhibition, where he shared his story as an artist, as well as the story of his father and Delbridge as artists. The exhibition is included in free general admission and on view through early December.

Hopi Visions was Dr. Jones’s last exhibition at the DMA. She and her husband are moving to Abu Dhabi, where he has accepted a new position.

Julian Onderdonk, Untitled (Field of Bluebonnets), Dallas Museum of Art

Ambassador Row
This winter four works from the DMA’s collection will be installed at Truman Hall in Brussels, Belgium, the US NATO Mission residence of The Honorable Kay Bailey Hutchison, the US Ambassador to NATO. The Ambassador, who previously served as a US Senator from Texas, requested the DMA works through the State Department’s “Art in Embassies” program to promote cultural diplomacy. They include paintings by Lone Star State artists Frank Klepper, Reveau Bassett, and Julian Onderdonk, and the incomparable British statesman and “Sunday” painter Winston Churchill. The DMA “NATO exhibition” will remain on view for up to three years to coincide with Ambassador Hutchison’s tour of duty.

Five Decades of Deep Commitment
In January, Texas Instruments and the TI Foundation announced the establishment of a philanthropic fellowship program to honor its founders’ long legacy of giving back. Funded by a $2.1 million TI Foundation grant, the TI Founders Leadership Fellows program provides three annual nonprofit work experiences to university or graduate students planning a nonprofit career. The fellowships, designed to build a pipeline of nonprofit leaders in the Dallas area over the next 20 years, were established in collaboration with three local organizations with strong ties to TI’s founders: the Dallas Museum of Art, the University of Texas at Dallas, and United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

The TI Foundation, which has provided tremendous support to the DMA for over half a century, is also a presenting sponsor this year of The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana. Organized by the DMA and inspired by the Museum’s collection, it is the first American museum exhibition dedicated to Asante regalia in over 30 years.

Jacques Blanchard, Zeus and Semele, c. 1632, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art

Piet Mondrian, The Sea (Ocean 2) (verso), Dallas Museum of Art

Woman with a Lamp (1909) , Dallas Museum of Art

Three Gifts of Art by Three European Masters
The DMA recently announced the gift of three major works of European art that reflect the extraordinary generosity of Dallas collectors and their dedication to expanding the Museum’s collection in meaningful ways. Zeus and Semele is a recently rediscovered masterwork by the important 17th-century Baroque painter Jacques Blanchard. Although not as well known today–a fate related to the artist’s early death at 37 and resulting scarcity of his work—Blanchard was celebrated in his day for his richly hued and sensual subjects inspired by 16th-century Venetian painting. Through the generosity of collectors Thomas C. and Jeanne Campbell, who gifted this exceedingly rare and remarkable painting to the Museum’s Foundation for the Arts Collection, the DMA continues to expand its Old Master collection with exceptional works of art.

Ann Jacobus Folz’s gave two amazing examples of European Modernism reinforcing the Museum’s impressive holdings of early 20th-century art. The first is an impressive scaled, double-sided charcoal drawing by the modern master Piet Mondrian, the eleventh example by Mondrian to enter the collection. The DMA has the second largest holdings of his work in the U.S. thanks to the continued generous giving of Dallas collectors. The front side boasts an evocative, almost painterly drawing that relates closely to the painting Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening (c. 1916) in the Museum’s collection. On the back, an abstract composition titled The Sea (Ocean 2) reveals the beginning of Mondrian’s move away from representational imagery toward the grid structure that would become a hallmark of later works. “This crucial intermediary phase of Mondrian’s stylistic development was, until now, missing from the collection,” noted Dr. Nicole Myers, the DMA’s Lillian and James H. Clark Curator of European Painting and Sculpture. “With this gift, our visitors will be able to experience the dramatic transformation of Mondrian’s approach—from Post-Impressionism to Abstraction—as it unfolds across the walls of our galleries.”

The Museum also acquired from Folz a significant painting by Pierre Bonnard, its seventeenth work by this influential Modern artist. In spite of the Museum’s deep holdings, Woman with a Lamp (1909) is the first acquisition that captures Bonnard’s transition from the decorative Nabi aesthetic of the 1890s to his more abstract, brightly hued paintings from the 1920s on.

On view at the DMA this Winter/Spring:

Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins
Stoffel Quadrant Gallery

Young Masters 2018
February 24 to April 15, 2018
Concourse
Exclusively at the DMA

Edward Steichen: In Exaltation of Flowers
Through May 13, 2018
Rachofsky Quadrant Gallery
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Paris at the Turn of the Century
Through May 27, 2018
Level 2
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Laura Owens
March 25 to July 29, 2018
Hoffman Galleries

The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana
April 15 to August 12, 2018
Chilton
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit
Through December 2, 2018
Focus II
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road
Through December 9, 2018
Level 3
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery
Through April 26, 2020
Focus I
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Crow Collection of Asian Art Exhibitions, Lectures, and Events

Kwon, Soon Hyung (b. 1929)
Nature
2002
Porcelain clay body
TC2017.4

EXHIBITIONS

 

Earthly Splendor: Korean Ceramics from the Collection

January 20 – ongoing

This exhibition pairs outstanding examples of contemporary Korean ceramics with historical Korean ceramics from the museum’s permanent collection to highlight the material, aesthetic, stylistic, and technical developments of Korean ceramics throughout history.

 

Fierce Loyalty: A Samurai Complete

Ongoing

The exhibition features an exquisitely crafted and perfectly preserved samurai suit of armor worn by Abe Masayoshi (1700-1769), Lord of Fukuyama Fiefdom in the Edo period (1603–1868). It also includes a 17th-century pair of Kasen-zu byōbu, or battle screens, which depict the important historical battle of Yashima from the Genpei War (1180–1185), which was fought between the Minamoto and Taira families.

 

 

WORKSHOPS/LECTURES

 

Breathe: Art and Wellness Workshop

Sat. March 10 10:00am-2:00pm

Now in its third year, the Breathe program invites local veterans and first responders to gather for monthly workshops centered around the practices of qigong and art-making. March’s workshop will introduce the Japanese art of Kitsugi, which involves piecing broken ceramics back together with resin and powdered gold.

This month’s Qigong practice will focus on the second of eight principles: Rising Energy. The Crow Collection is proud to partner with SimplyAware to offer quality Qigong training for each workshop. Rooted in Traditional Chinese Medicine, the practice of Qigong involves simple movement to improve breathing, posture, and mental focus. Learn more about Qigong with the video below of SimplyAware instructor Chris Bouguyon demonstrating the Golden Ball practice.

 

Breathe: Art and Wellness Workshop

Sat. April 21 10:00am-2:00pm

Now in its third year, the Breathe program invites local veterans and first responders to gather for monthly workshops centered around the practices of Qigong and art-makingIn April, participants will explore photography and work together to capture moments in the city and in nature outside of the museum (weather permitting). In May, you will use these photos to create a multi-media collage.

This month’s Qigong practice will focus on the third of eight principles: Minding the Breath. The Crow Collection is proud to partner with SimplyAware to offer quality qigong training for each workshop. Rooted in Traditional Chinese Medicine, the practice of qigong involves simple movement to improve breathing, posture, and mental focus. Learn more about Qigong with the video below of SimplyAware instructor Chris Bouguyon demonstrating the Golden Ball practice.

 

EVENTS

 

Bloom and Give Trunk Show at the Lotus Shop

Friday March 23 and Saturday March 24 12:00pm-5:00pm

Bloom and Give’s products are created by small co-ops in India that share their relentless pursuit of excellence and quality, and their belief in a fair wage. Their products include handmade scarves, home goods, and bags, and their goal is to use age-old techniques to create contemporary designs that can be enjoyed in everyday life. Proceeds from this trunk show will go towards education programs for girls in India!

 

Julie Cohn Trunk Show at the Lotus Shop

Friday April 27 and Saturday April 28 12:00pm-5:00pm

Julie Cohn Design uses old-world casting techniques to create modern artifacts. Made in America, each piece has been carved in wax by the designer and finished by hand in Dallas. All of Julie’s creative endeavors have come together to form her unique vision and aesthetic, and her pieces are all about possibilities for layering and stacking to create one-of-a-kind collages or small sculptures that uniquely juxtapose disparate elements with simple elegance.

 

WEEKDAY WELLNESS CLASSES AT THE CROW COLLECTION:

 

Here’s the weekday wellness breakdown. All classes are free, and no registration is necessary. Free two-hour parking validation for Friends of the Crow Collection

Classes take place at 2001 Ross Ave. Suite 3550 – Crow Collection of Asian Art Offices on the 35th floor of Trammell Crow Center.

 

Mondays – Mindfulness Meditation

12:00 – 12:45pm

Begin your week by resetting and recharging as a counterpoint to the chaotic movement of life. Create an opportunity for the body and mind to connect with the breath and explore a peaceful presence in the moment. Join this guided group meditation to experience a deeper sense of awareness, increase your attention and focus, and enhance self-insight. All levels are welcome. Come as you are: these programs are designed for professionals in business attire. This class will be led by Michael Lavalle PhD.

Tuesdays – Qigong

12:00 – 1:00pm

Qigong (pronounced chee gung) is sometimes described as “the soul of tai chi.” Dating back 4500 years, Qigong is considered one of the catalysts of traditional Chinese medicine practices. This class promotes flexibility, balance, and strength in the body through gentle, flowing movements. This class will be led by Sifu Fayne Bouguyon, LMT of SimplyAware.

 

Wednesdays – Tai Chi

12:00 – 1:00pm

Tai chi (also known as tai chi chuan or tai ji) is a Chinese traditional art of movement that is widely known for its graceful, meditative form. This class follows a series of movements practiced in a slow, focused manner to decrease stress, increase balance and agility, and promote overall physical and mental well-being. This class will be led by Greg Young of White Rock Tai Chi.

 

Thursdays – Restorative Yoga

12:00 – 1:00pm

Restorative yoga has many benefits including increased flexibility, decreased stress, and lowered blood pressure. This class involves relaxing yoga poses using blankets and other props to support the body as you rest. This class will be led by Erin Brandao E-RYT 500.

 

Fridays – The Relaxation Room

12:00 – 1:00pm

On Fridays from noon-1:00 PM the Center for Contemplative Leadership will be open for anyone to come and sit and breathe. Self-guided meditation instructions will be provided for any interested.