Category: EODIAH Research Center

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

The O’Donnell Institute has an exciting array of programs for the spring semester! 

On January 29 Dr. Ittai Weinryb, Associate Professor of Art History at Bard Graduate Center, will give a workshop talk That Moment of Complexity at the Research Center on votive offerings. 

In February EODIAH Lecturer Dr. Ali Alibhai will discuss his current research on Moroccan bell-lamps. 

On March 29-30 the O’Donnell Institute and the DMA will present a two-day event exploring the life and work of Impressionist painter Berthe Morisot.

Our graduate fellows will present their dissertation research throughout the semester, with topics ranging from globalization and new Bollywood cinema to American Athenaea. 

Our visiting ISAAC post-doctoral fellows will share their respective research on twentieth-century African American Art and the significance of “place-making” in Isamu Noguchi’s work.

This spring will also include workshops with two of the recently arrived curators at the DMA: Sarah Schleuning, Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design, and Katherine Brodbeck, The Nancy and Tim Hanley Associate Curator of Contemporary Art.

The Research Center promises to be a lively center of scholarly activity this spring. We look forward to the coming semester and welcome you to our many spring programs.

Visit our website to plan your calendar!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Ronald Lockett, Awakening, 1996, tin, metal grate, and nails on wood. Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund and gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Foundation. Photo by Stephen Pitkin/Pitkin Studio.

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

Günther Förg, Color Field, 1986, Acrylic on wood, 80 x 200 cm, 31 ½ x 78 ¾ in. Private collection.

We are excited to welcome everyone to join us this fall for our scholarly programs in the Research Center. Fall workshops by guest speakers include James Clifton, Director of the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation and Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Paintings at the MFAH; Dr. Elizabeth Molacek, Curatorial Fellow in the Division of Asian and Mediterranean of the Harvard Art Museums; and Catherine Craft, Curator at the Nasher Sculpture Center.  In October our own Dr. Paul Galvez, EODIAH Visiting Assistant Professor and MA Program Chair will give a Workshop Talk titled Violence and Impressionism: the case of early Cézanne, which is drawn from his current book project. On November 6, 7:00 p.m. Dr. Gregory H. Williams, Associate Professor of Contemporary Art at Boston University, will give a public lecture on artist Günther Förg in conjunction with the DMA’s fall special exhibition Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty. Förg was a prolific and provocative artist from the Cologne art scene of the 1980s, and his work reflects the cultural and political climate of postwar Germany. Dr. Williams will share highlights from the exhibition and consider the artist’s work within the context of world events and key issues in 20th-century art.

The Research Center will host a new exhibition this fall: The Art of Living in the Eighteenth Century. Our sixth vitrine installation, curated by EODIAH Visiting Assistant Professor and MA Program Chair Dr. Paul Galvez, and DMA Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design, Sarah Schleuning, highlights the depth and quality of the DMA’s decorative arts collection.

Finally, we’re thrilled to announce that the Research Center will host two graduate seminars for our first cohort of Art History MA students. Foundations II: History of Materials and Techniques explores the history of artistic materials and techniques, and asks how materials and the act of making create meaning. A cornerstone of the MA program, students will have the unique opportunity for close engagements with artworks in the DMA’s collection among others. Topics in the History of Collecting: Early Modern examines patronage and collecting at the early modern European court (c. 1400-1700), where often in the same space wonders of art were displayed alongside wonders of art and science.

The Research Center promises to be a lively center of scholarly activity this fall with a new group of fellows and graduate students. We look forward to the coming year and welcome you to our many Fall programs. Visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/and plan your calendar!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

O’Donnell Institute Fellows’ Preview of Francisco Moreno’s The Chapel and Accompanying Works at Erin Cluley Gallery, April 4, 2018.

It’s been an exciting spring with guest lectures by distinguished art historians.  Dr. Yve-Alain Bois gave a riveting lecture at the Nasher Sculpture Center on Matisse’s use of the bamboo stick in his drawing practice, with a focus on his late stations of the cross.  Our O’Donnell Institute Visiting Research Professor, Dr. Suzanne Preston Blier, presented her new material on Picasso’s most famous painting, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, soon to be published in a new book.  On the eve of his retirement Dr. Thomas Gaehtgens, Director of the Getty Research Institute, spoke about the ways in which the greatest 19th century German museum director, Wilhelm von Bode, dealt with the pervasive European fear that Americans were purloining European culture.

EODIAH’s own Drs. Sarah Kozlowski and Elizabeth Ranieri gave an exciting report on February 27 on the O’Donnell Institute’s new research center in Naples.  The Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities will launch in Fall 2018, and great strides have been made to prepare for the first group of research residents, who will begin to arrive in August.

Our O’Donnell fellows had the opportunity to preview local artist Francisco Moreno’s The Chapel and Accompanying Works large-scale painting installation at Erin Cluley Gallery on April 4, prior to its public opening.  The presentation features Moreno’s all-encompassing painting surface based on the barrel-vaulted structure of the Spanish Romanesque mural paintings from the Hermitage of la Vera Cruz (Maderuelo) installed in the Prado, Madrid.  The Chapel will be on view through May 19 at the Erin Cluley Gallery.

Planning is underway for our fall programs; visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ later this summer and plan your calendar!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

Henri Matisse drawing with bamboo pole tipped with charcoal in his studio, Nice, France. Photo by Robert Capa

 

 

 

 

The Institute has an exciting array of programs for the spring semester. We will welcome an impressive list of guest presenters from important institutions across the country. From the Institute of Advanced Studies in Princeton, art historian Dr. Yve-Alain Bois will present his latest research on Henri Matisse’s adoption of the bamboo stick to draw his late stations of the cross, hosted by the Nasher Sculpture Center on March 27, 6:00 p.m. Our Visiting Research Professor Dr. Suzanne Preston Blier will give a public lecture on her book project on Picasso’s Demoiselles d’Avignon and his diverse sources of inspiration for the iconic work on April 5, 7:00 p.m. at the Dallas Museum of Art. Dr. Thomas Gaehtgens, Director of the Getty Research Institute, will discuss the impact of Gilded Age American collectors on Europe’s artistic patrimony from the perspective of the great German museum director Wilhelm von Bode on April 10, 7:30 p.m. at the DMA. Our graduate fellows will present their dissertation research throughout the semester, with topics ranging from early modern playbook title pages to new media race humor. The spring will culminate with Intersections: Visual Cultures of Islamic Cosmopolitanism, a collaboration between the O’Donnell Institute; the Islamic Art Revival Series, a program of the Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation; and the Agha Khan Council in Dallas. The symposium will be on May 4 – 5 at UT Dallas, the DMA, and Ismaili Jamatkhana Plano.

 

Our fifth vitrine exhibition, selected by DMA Curator Dr. Anne Bromberg, will be installed in late March. It will display a collection of Asian ceramics that correlate with Dr. Bromberg’s current exhibition, Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road, which highlights the passage of luxury goods along the Silk Road between Asia, India, and Uzbekistan, among others. Be sure to spend time in the exhibition on Level 3 at the DMA before heading downstairs to see the ceramics on display in our vitrine.

 

We hope you can join us this spring at our many programs and look forward to the dialogues created by the new scholarship presented. Visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ and plan your calendar!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

“Patterns of Islamic Art” at the O’Donnell Institute Research Center at the Dallas Museum of Art, 2017, photograph by Carolyn Brown

 

We are excited to welcome everyone to join us this fall for our scholarly programs in the Research Center. Upon her completion of the first English-language translations of Paul Gauguin’s seven texts, UTD Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr. Elpida Vouitsis discussed on August 29th how Gauguin’s writing style successfully communicates the duality of meaning in his artworks. In November our fellows have the special opportunity to visit the recent installation of Keir Collection objects with Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir. Our semester will conclude with a workshop by one of our new PhD fellows, Edleeca Thompson. Her research examines the myriad of ways museums display African art collections and how these design decisions effect interpretation.

The Research Center will host two new exhibitions this fall: Patterns in Islamic Art and Maya Trade and the Ulúa River Regions. I’ve curated a selection of Carolyn Brown’s photographs of Islamic architecture in the Middle East. Her images beautifully capture the nonfigural design elements in Islamic art: geometric, vegetal, and calligraphic. Patterns repeat and intertwine in colorful tiles on mosque façades and delicate stained glass that decorate intimate interiors. Our fourth vitrine installation, curated by DMA Curator Dr. Kimberly Jones, displays small ceramic vessels from the Ulúa region in Honduras. Despite their diminutive size, these objects were bound up in networks of trade and exchange throughout the Classic Maya kingdoms.

The Research Center promises to be a lively center of scholarly activity this fall with a new group of fellows from around the globe. We look forward to the coming year and welcome you to our many Fall programs. Visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ and plan your calendar!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

 

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

 

We’ve had an exciting spring semester of workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. A diverse range of topics were presented including Ethiopian manuscript painting, museum exhibition design, and the impact of water mixable oils (WMOs) on current art conservation practice. The semester will conclude with two workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. On April 18 SMU Professor of Art Dr. Michael Corris will present his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art, “a compilation of insightful, first-hand accounts of art making, art criticism, and exhibition organizing from the early-1970s to the present.” EODIAH fellow and newly minted Ph.D. Dr. Joseph Hartman will present his research at our final workshop of the semester on April 25,Cuba Incarcerated: The Historic Vision of Cuban Prison Architecture. The Research Center continues to be a hive of scholarly activity and a space in which to display artworks.

Curated by our own Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, the third vitrine installation showcases beautiful lusterware ceramics from the Keir Collection. The collection of objects tells the story of the revolutionary technique of luster painting with examples from Iraq, Iran, and Egypt. Come by and view our ‘sneak peek’ of Islamic lusterware before the next installation of Keir objects at the DMA opens April 18 in the Focus I Gallery.

Be sure to visit the EODIAH Programs page on our website this summer to view our Fall 2017 events!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History