Category: Naples

Greetings from the Associate Director (Acting Director 2018-2019)

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski, Assistant Director
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

After a restorative winter break spent reconnecting with family and returning to my own writing, I am ready to leap into the new semester. I’m particularly looking forward to participating in our spring line-up of scholarly programs at the Institute, continuing to mentor our wonderful group of Master’s students and preparing to welcome our second class this fall, developing our programming at The Wilcox Space, and tending to our fledgling Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities in Naples.

Our first semester at the Center in Naples was busy and intense, full of successes both large and small—our study day on the ancient port of Naples with Rabun Taylor of UT Austin was a highlight, as well as our series of visiting scholars (Sabina de Cavi, Nora Lambert, Silvia Armando, Kristen Streahle, and Julie Beckers) who gave informal seminars on their work for our Research Residents and Capodimonte colleagues. 

No less exciting have been the many discoveries that our Residents have made on the ground in Naples and in the archives. Throughout the semester, our extraordinary Research Coordinator Francesca Santamaria has led our residents on visits to collections, libraries, archives, conservation studios, and other sites in Naples.

I’ll make my next trip to Naples in February, when we’ll welcome scholars Brigitte Marin and Ivan Foletti to lead seminars with our Residents. And at the end of May we will host a scholars’ seminar on research approaches to the movement of artworks, artists, and artists’ materials between the Italian and Iberian peninsulas in the premodern world. 

Organized in collaboration with my colleague and friend Sabina de Cavi, the program will include seminar-style presentations, roundtable conversations, and site visits to archives throughout the city. At the same time, we are already looking ahead to the next academic year; you will find a call for applications for 2019-2020 Research Residencies in Naples here.

There have been growing pains over these first months too—we are still working to secure a strong and reliable wireless signal, for example! But passo dopo passo we are hitting our stride, and I am constantly reenergized by the intellectual life that is springing up right in the heart of the Bosco di Capodimonte. Colleagues at institutions throughout the city, and most importantly at the Museo di Capodimonte, have opened their doors to us with warmth and enthusiasm. In ways large and small they have supported our Residents’ research and helped us establish the Center’s scholarly presence in Naples.

I am convinced that our work at the Center will make an important contribution to new research on Naples, south Italy, and the Mediterranean. And I am thrilled that the O’Donnell Institute’s scholarly presence on the Bay of Naples will become even more important beginning this summer, when we will welcome the archeologist Michael Thomas as the Institute’s new Director—one of Michael’s current research focuses is at the Roman site of Oplontis, just south of Naples. The future is bright for the O’Donnell Institute, both in Dallas and in Naples! 

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski

Associate Director (Acting Director 2018-2019)

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Research Residents, Capodimonte colleagues, and Research Coordinator Francesca Santamaria visit the studio of the conservator Bruno Arciprete

Colleagues from the Center, the Capodimonte, and the Bibliotheca Hertziana visit the Museo Archeologico with UT Austin Professor Rabun Taylor during a study day on the Ancient Port of Naples

Research Residents Elizabeth Duntemann, Fabrizio Ballabio, Anatole Upart, and Peter Levins

Research Residents Justinne Lake-Jedzinak and Sara
Berkowitz in the conservation studio of the Capodimonte

Greetings from the Associate Director

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski, Associate Director
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Our Spring semester of academic programs began with two outstanding Workshop Talks from Edith O’Donnell Graduate Fellows Aditi Samarth and Fatemeh Tashakori, the first nearing completion of the dissertation and the second in the earliest stages of discovery. Samarth traces the transmission and adaptation of burial practices in Hindu diaspora communities (including Dallas); Tashakori is assembling and studying for the first time a group of Persian murals that reframe western images of the female body. Both deal with images, artworks, and ritual in circulation across space and time, overturning existing assumptions and imagining new ways of doing art history. Later this semester, Workshop Talks from our other O’Donnell Fellows will prove similarly generative. We are also looking ahead to putting together our next group of Fellows for the 2018-2019 academic year—a call for applications appears at the end of this newsletter.  Meanwhile, we are working hard on two research initiatives that will launch this Fall. In September, the O’Donnell Institute will assume stewardship of The Wilcox Space,with whom we have collaborated over the past five years to show and study the paintings and works on paper of the artist John Wilcox. In this next phase, we will dedicate The Wilcox Space to exhibiting and documenting the work of Dallas-based painters who, like Wilcox, engage with the craft and theory of the medium of painting. Exhibitions at The Wilcox Space will combine with open-access digital publications, public and academic programs, and a small artist’s library built around Wilcox’s own to create a forum or incubator for looking at and thinking about painting.

La Capraia at the Museo di Capodimonte

Also opening its doors this Fall is our new research center in Naples at the Museo di Capodimonte, the Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities / Centro per la Storia dell’Arte e dell’Architettura delle Città Portuali. On my most recent trip to Naples, we finalized a memorandum of understanding between the O’Donnell Institute and the Capodimonte and began work to prepare La Capraia (“the goat farm”), an eighteenth-century agricultural building at the heart of the Museum’s surrounding bosco, to welcome research residents and scholarly programs beginning in September. I also spent time visiting with colleagues at universities, research institutes, and libraries throughout Naples, in an effort to weave the Center into the scholarly life of the city from the very beginning. My hope is that the Center will become a place where scholars from Italy, the United States, and around the world will come together to think in new ways about the art histories of port cities and other centers of encounter, exchange, and transformation.

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski

Associate Director

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Fall Symposium in Naples: A collaboration between the O’Donnell Institute and the Museo di Capodimonte

Napoli e il Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte

in un contesto mondiale  

12-14 Ottobre 2017

 

 

Giovedì 12 Ottobre

Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte

 

9.00                 Punto di incontro al museo (cortile adiacente la biglietteria)
registrazione partecipanti con distribuzione materiale e pass

9.45                 Partenza shuttle per il Cellaio

 

IL CELLAIO

10.00               Caffè di benvenuto

10.30               Saluti introduttivi

                        Sylvain Bellenger (Direttore Museo e Real Bosco Capodimonte)

                        Sarah Kozlowski (Assistant Director, The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

                        Barthélémy Jobert (Presidente Università Paris-Sorbonne)

                        Pietro Spirito (Presidente Autorità di Sistema Portuale del Tirreno Centrale)

11.00-11.40     Il porto di Napoli nel Mediterraneo

Olaf Merk (Administrator Ports and Shipping at the International Transport Forum (ITF) of the

OECD)

Sergio Arzeni (President, International Network for SME, Rome; Executive Member, Global

Coalition for Efficient Logistics, Geneva; Former Director, OECD)

11.40-11.50     Breve introduzione alla storia del Bosco di Capodimonte

                        Carmine Guarino e Salvatore Terrano (Università degli Studi del Sannio)

12.00               Shuttle dal Cellaio verso il Giardino Torre

                         Passeggiata guidata nel Bosco di Capodimonte fino al Giardino Torre

                        Carmine Guarino e Salvatore Terrano (Università degli Studi del Sannio)

12.45-13.45     Pranzo al Giardino Torre

13.45               Ritorno al Cellaio con shuttle

14.00               Caffè

14.15               Inizio lavori

Introduce e coordinano Sarah Kozlowski (The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History) e

                       Elizabeth Ranieri (The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

14.30-15.00    La Chiesa di San Gennaro a Capodimonte

                       Maria Gabriella Pezone (Università della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”)

15.00-15.30     Spain, Rome, and the Planning of Capodimonte

                         Robin Thomas (Pennsylvania State University)

15.30-16.00     The Royal Palace of Capodimonte: A Symbol of Power in its Urban Context

                         Alba Irollo (Bruxelles)

16.30               Ritorno al Museo di Capodimonte (con shuttle) o visita a San Gennaro e La Capraia (a piedi)

16.45               Visita facoltativa al Museo di Capodimonte (aperto fino alle 19.30)

 

 

Porto

 

19.30               Cena di benvenuto al Porto, con saluti delle autorità:

Antimo Cesaro (Mibact, Sottosegretario)

                       Vincenzo de Luca (Regione Campania, Presidente)

                        Luigi De Magistris (Comune di Napoli, Sindaco)

 

Saluti e ringraziamenti, Richard Brettell (Director, The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

 

 

Venerdì 13 Ottobre

Museo di Capodimonte

 

GALLERIA NAPOLETANA/2° piano

 

9.00                 Saluti: Sarah Kozlowski (The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

 

9.05                 Introduce e coordina Pierluigi Leone de Castris (Università degli Studi Suor Orsola Benincasa)

 

9.15-9.45         Fragments of Liturgy: the Jonah Slab and the Paschal Candlestick in of Capodimonte’s Collection in  

                         their Context

                        Manuela Gianandrea (Roma, Università La Sapienza) e Elisabetta Scirocco (Roma, Bibliotheca

Hertziana)

9.45-10.15       Stranieri a Napoli: il trittico di Sant’Antonio Abate di Niccolò di Tommaso

                        Teresa D’Urso (Università della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”)

 

10.15-10.45     Valencia, Naples, and the Netherlands: Colantonio’s Vincent Ferrer Altarpiece as a Product of

                          Cultural Transfer and Visual Translation Adrian Bremenkamp (Roma, Bibliotheca Hertziana)

 

SALA BURRI/2° piano sezione arte contemporanea

 

10.45               Caffè

 

11.00-11.30     L’Arte Contemporanea al Museo di Capodimonte

                        Andrea Viliani (Napoli, Museo MADRE)

 

11.30-12.00     Black Porosity: On Alberto Burri’s Grande Cretto

                        Riccardo Venturi (Parigi, Gerda Henkel Stiftung)

 

GALLERIA NAPOLETANA/Sala 102/2° piano

 

12.00-12.30     Silver: Surface and Substance

                         Helen Hills (York, University of York)
13.00-14.30     Pranzo, Trattoria da Luisa

 

 

APPARTAMENTO REALE/Sala 44 /1° piano

 

15.00-15.30     Foreigners and their Role in the Neapolitan Crêche

                        Carmine Romano (Université Paris-Sorbonne)

 

GALLERIA FARNESE/Sala 19/1° piano

 

15.30-16.00     Monstrorum historia: Agostino Carracci’s Arrigo peloso, Pietro matto, Amon nano

                           and the court of Cardinal Odoardo Farnese

Mary Vaccaro (University of Texas at Arlington)

 

WUNDERKAMMER/Galleria Farnese/1° piano

 

16.00-16.30     Collecting and the Circulation of Goods in Fifteenth-Century Naples

                         Leah Clark (The Open University)

16.30-17.00     La Circolazione delle Merci e delle Opere d’Arte nel Porto di Napoli del XVII Secolo

                        Gian Giotto Borrelli (Università degli Studi Suor Orsola Benincasa)

17.00               Visita facoltativa al Museo di Capodimonte (aperto fino alle 19.30)

 

Sabato 14 Ottobre

Museo di Capodimonte

                          

APPARTAMENTO REALE/Sala 60/1° piano

 

9.45                 Saluti: Sarah Kozlowski (The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

 

9.50                 Introduce e coordina Tanja Michalsky (Bibliotheca Hertziana)

 

10.00-10.30     Out of context: il tabernacolo di S. Patrizia come metafora dell’arredo                                

                           sacro tra committenza, tutela, commercio e musealizzazione

                         Sabina de Cavi (Universidad de Córdoba)

 

GALLERIA NAPOLETANA/Sala 104/2° piano

 

10.40-11.10     Emulation, Vainglory, and Failure: Paolo de Matteis’s Self-Fashioning

                        James Clifton (Museum of Fine Arts, Houston / Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation)

11.10-11.30     Caffè
GALLERIA NAPOLETANA/Sala 91/2° piano

 

11.30-12.00     Rustic Tidings: Reconsidering the Master of the Annunciation to the Shepherds

                        Jesse Locker (Portland State University)
12.00-12.30     Spaniards in Naples: Mobility and Identity in a Contact Zone

                          Fernando Loffredo (Washington, National Gallery of Art / Center for Advanced Study in the

Visual Arts)

13.00-14.30     Pranzo, Trattoria da Luisa
SALONE DEI CAMUCCINI/1° piano Appartamento Reale

 

15.00-15.30     Napoli e Cina

                         Lucia Caterina (L’Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”)

15.30-16.00     Mattia Gasparini and the Salottino di Porcellana in a European Context

                         Tobias Locker (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)

16.00-16.30     Maria Amalia e il Salottino di Porcellana tra le corti di Sassonia, Polonia, e Italia

Agnese Pudlis (Royal Castle, Warsaw)

16.30-17.30     Visita facoltativa al Museo di Capodimonte (aperto fino alle 19.30)

 

CORTILE

 

17.30               Cocktail di chiusura

Saluti

Sylvain Bellenger (Direttore Museo e Real Bosco Capodimonte)

 

                        Conclusioni

                       Richard Brettell (The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History)

 

 

 

Call for Proposals: Naples and the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte in a Global Context

Symposium: Naples and the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte in a Global Context

Naples, October 12-14, 2017

 

PROPOSALS DUE APRIL 24, 2017

 

One of the world’s oldest cultural centers and one of the largest ports in Europe, the city of Naples is a node in a cultural and economic network that spans the Mediterranean and beyond. The story of art in Naples is one of encounter and exchange, of rupture and unexpected convergence. It is above all a story of movement: of people, artworks, and forms, of technologies, traditions, and ideas. Naples thus challenges us to envision a new history of art that ranges across geography, chronology, and medium. Art in Naples has long been marginalized or misunderstood. Instead, we take Naples as a laboratory for new art historical research with global implications.

To launch a new collaboration between the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History and the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte dedicated to innovative research on art in Naples and on the cultural histories of port cities, this symposium brings together an international group of scholars for two days of on-site presentations that will set Naples and the Capodimonte in a global context.

 

After a public keynote lecture and celebratory reception on the evening of Thursday, October 12, a group of around 30 scholars will spend the next two days participating in a series of presentations in the form of gallery talks and site visits that will focus on individual artworks in the Capodimonte collections and on sites within its surrounding gardens. Each presentation will be followed by discussion. Moderated roundtables and shared meals will provide further opportunities for participants to respond to each other’s presentations and to engage with broader themes.

 

We invite scholars at all professional stages (including advanced graduate students) to propose 20-minute presentations that focus either on individual artworks at the Capodimonte or on specific sites in the Bosco. Through these individual objects and sites, presentations should open onto larger questions related to Naples and the Capodimonte in a global context: for example, the formation of the Capodimonte’s collections and gardens, the cultural history of Naples as a port city, the mobility of objects and people, and processes of circulation, encounter, and exchange. Presentations may be made in Italian or English.

 

To propose a presentation on a specific artwork or site at the Capodimonte, please submit via email attachment a proposal of under 350 words and a short CV to Elizabeth Ranieri, The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History (enr101020@utdallas.edu), by April 24, 2017. Proposals will be reviewed by collaborators at the O’Donnell Institute and the Capodimonte. A certain number of presenters not based in Naples will be offered a small grant to contribute toward the cost of travel.

Sarah Kozlowski: Toward a History of the Trecento Diptych

EODIAH Assistant Director Sarah Kozlowski’s article “Toward a History of the Trecento Diptych: Format, Materiality, and Mobility in a Corpus of Diptychs from Angevin Naples” will appear in 2018 in Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte. Laying the groundwork for a larger project, the essay brings together for the first time a working corpus of diptychs connected with the Angevin court in Naples in the later thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The corpus comprises both surviving diptychs and diptychs now lost but recorded in inventories. Thus assembled, this body of material reveals that diptychs were commissioned and collected in significant numbers at the Neapolitan court, in a range of sizes, mediums, and subjects, and were produced by workshops linked not only to Naples but also to central Italy, Genoa, and the eastern Mediterranean. In turn, diptychs in Naples raise larger questions about the histories, materialities, and meanings of the format in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in Europe and the Mediterranean. Above all, the objects brought together here press us to set diptychs in motion as participants in networks of artworks, artists, and patrons on the move throughout the Mediterranean.