Category: Vol 2 Issue 1

Report of the Director

Richard Brettell - AH - Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies - Art History

Richard Brettell – Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies – Art History

The specialist history of Chinese Art in America is now more than a century old, and we have important collections of Chinese Art and concomitant art historians who specialize in Chinese art in virtually every American city. Yet, with Maoist China, both commerce in Chinese art and active scholarly interchange was in hiatus. Now, with the openness of China and with the competitive edge in the world economy swinging in its direction, any serious art history institute must reckon with China.

Fortunately, we at UTD have one of the first Confucius Institutes in the US, and its Director, Dr. Ming Dong Gu, is a native of the great imperial and university city of Nanjing (which we used to call Nanking). Through Dr. Gu’s efforts, we at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History were invited by the Institute of Art to the University of Nanjing.

Our idea was simple, to introduce for the first time in a major Chinese university (whose origins go back to the third century of the common era!) an Institute of the Study of American Art in China (ISAAC). Our partner in this endeavor is the Amon Carter Museum, whose collection of American Art and whose unparalleled library and archive of American Art history is one of the great resources of North Texas. Dr. Andrew Walker and I went to China under Dr. Gu’s expert guidance and spent several days in Nanjing.

It was, for both of us, our first trip to China and was in every way life-changing. We landed in Shanghai, took the fast train to Nanjing, and were immediately immersed in the graduate school campus of the University of Nanjing. Our tour of the beautiful old campus included the Pearl Buck House, where the first American Woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature lived in the 1920’s and early 1930’s when Nanjing was the capital of Republic China. This block-like, grey brick house now stands empty in the center of the campus and is, for Americans, an architectural talisman of a time when Americans played a vital role in the international understanding of China.

In our conversations with Dr. Zhou Xian, the distinguished Director of the Art Institute of Nanjing University, the graduate students in its distinguished program of aesthetics and art history, and the undergraduates at the new suburban undergraduate campus of the University of Nanjing, both Andrew and I were impressed by the rare combination of knowledge and curiosity that is essential to the most important scholarship.

We began to conceive together an Institute for the Study of American Art in China that has four components: 1. Systematically training Chinese Art historians to teach and research the history of American Art, 2. Publishing an evolving series of important titles in American Art History in Chinese, 3. Bringing distinguished American art historians to Nanjing for a series of Summer Courses in American Art History, and 3. Imagining with colleagues at Chinese museums a program of exhibitions of American Art in China.

Before we left and in more intensive conversations after our return, we discussed these efforts with Chicago’s Terra Foundation for American Art, who will become the fifth partner in an initial three-year joint funding of this institute with the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History and the Confucius Institute at UTD, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, and the University of Nanjing.

This program of cooperation among a Chinese and an American university, an American museum, and an American foundation committed to promoting knowledge of American Art history outside our borders, can—and will—have a profound effect both on China and on the US. American Art historians have contributed so much in the past century to the art historical knowledge of European, Latin American, African, and Asian institutions. With ISAAC (our felicitous acronym), we will create a fertile context for US in the United Sates to learn about ourselves from Chinese scholars.

With wonderful direct flights from DFW airport to China, the work already accomplished by our Dean, Dr. Dennis Kratz, and the director of our Confucius Institute, will take on a new dimension and add the University of Nanjing to the highly “curated” international alliances of the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History. We will have active programs in Nanjing and Naples, in Munich and Zurich, and, perhaps, in France. Edith O’Donnell has allowed us at UTD to spread our wings, and we have flown far and wide.

Greetings from the Assistant Director

To launch the new year, on Saturday, January 13 the O’Donnell Institute partnered for the first time with the Crow Collection of Asian Art to present a symposium on the global histories of ceramics. Called Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas, the symposium brought together an all-star team of distinguished scholars to study and respond to the Crow’s stunning new exhibition Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles. The exhibition’s curator Farzaneh Pirouz was joined by Denise Leidy (Curator of Asian Art at Yale University Art Gallery), Guy Thomson (Professor Emeritus of Latin American History at University of Warwick), Jessica Hallet (Researcher in Art History at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Ronda Kasl (Curator of Latin American Art at the Metropolitan Museum), and William Sargent (Curator Emeritus of Asian Export Art at the Peabody Essex Museum) for three morning lectures held at the Dallas Museum of Art and an afternoon of gallery-based break-out sections at the Crow. Like the exhibition itself, presentations and conversations were truly global in scope, ranging from sixth-century China to ninth-century Basra to sixteenth-century Mexico to circa-1900 New York. Our own Sabiha Al Khemir presided over the morning session, and Rick Brettell and Crow curator Jacqueline Chao moderated a closing panel in the afternoon.

 

Participants in the Crow's international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections:  East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

Participants in the Crow’s international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

 

By all accounts the symposium was a great success, and it’s precisely the kind of program that we are passionate about presenting: collaborative, object-led conversations with broad art historical implications. At the same time that speakers treated specific art historical questions like the origins of the use of cobalt blue in ceramics, the day raised larger questions with broad art historical significance: How is a complex technology transferred across space, time, and culture? How do objects made in one medium like clay dialogue with other mediums like glass and silver? How do local industries like that of Talavera in Puebla intersect with histories of class, race, and national politics? And how do our art histories of porcelain, for example, shape our practices of collecting—and vice versa? These and other questions that emerged from conversations and close looking will chart the course for future research.

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

 

If you were among the many friends and colleagues who joined us on Saturday, thank you for coming! If you were not able to attend, there is still time to see the exhibition before it closes in Dallas on February 12 and travels to Puebla, Mexico. It’s not to be missed!

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski

Assistant Director

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Become a Friend

More than three years ago, the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History was founded with a $17 million gift from Mrs. O’Donnell, one of the largest single donations in the history of UT Dallas. With her largesse and under the leadership and vision of Dr. Richard Brettell, an exciting future is ahead for the Institute.

To expand the Institute’s work, a new Master’s in Art History will be launched in Fall 2018. This new initiative for the University will prepare a select and highly qualified group of students for careers in art research, education, museums and conservation. With the Institute’s headquarters in the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building at UT Dallas and the Dallas Museum of Art, future scholars will be inspired and motivated to learn about art in museum settings, taking advantage of an abundance of resources in our regional collections.

Other initiatives include an innovative international research partnership with the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples led by Dr. Sarah Kozlowski, Assistant Director, and a major art conservation initiative led by Dr. David McPhail, Distinguished Chair of Conservation Science. Both are the genesis of new collaborations with museums throughout the world.

We thank the following donors for their support of the O’Donnell Institute.  We invite you to join us as a “Friend” and be a part of Dr. Brettell’s vision to make EODIAH one of the world’s great art institutes and one of the greatest assets to UT Dallas and the cultural life of Texas.

 

FOUNDING DONOR
Edith O’Donnell

MAJOR DONORS
The State of Texas
Mrs. Eugene McDermott
The Hamon Charitable Foundation

O’DONNELL CIRCLE
The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation

DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE
Salle Stemmons

PATRON
Mr. Harlan Crow
Communities Foundation of Texas
Carolyn and Bob Dickson
Mr. and Mrs. John Ridings Lee
Legett Foundation

SCHOLAR
Ms. Ruth Mutch
George A. and and Nancy P. Shutt Foundation

PARTNER
The Dallas Foundation – Mr. and Mrs. William T. Solomon, Sr.
Mrs. Nancy M. Dedman
Ms. Patricia Patterson

SPECIAL RECOGNITION
Winifred and Ivan Phillips
Mr. Peter Rathbone and the Estate of Perry Rathbone
Eve Reid
Roger S. Horchow
Mrs. I.D. “Nash”  Flores III

You may make a gift at www.utdallas.edu/arthistory.

Please call me at (972) 883-2472 or email me at lucy.buchanan@utdallas.edu. I look forward to discussing the many significant ways you can help support the Institute and become a part of our exciting future.

Sincerely,

Lucy M. Buchanan
Director of Development
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Art of Examination Spring 2017 Course at UT Southwestern Medical School

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course will improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction. We discuss factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice. Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice. The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

The Art of Examination is taught at Dallas art institutions such as The Dallas Museum of Art, pictured.  Images courtesy of ArtDocs.

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, continues to make advances in the field of Art and Medicine.  This Spring 2017 semester she will continue to teach The Art of Examination course through UT Southwestern Medical School with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education, Dallas Museum of Art; and Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator.

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction.

Art of Examination Course 2017 II

At The Dallas Museum of Art

The class discusses factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice.  Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice.

The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at The Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

At The Dallas Museum of Art

At The Dallas Museum of Art

Report from the EODIAH Research Center

Thank you to everyone who joined us last fall at our workshops and events.  Our speakers presented thought-provoking research and the resulting discourses were lively and insightful.  We are excited to offer a full slate of programs for the coming spring semester, and welcome guest speakers from other cultural institutions.  Our two-day February symposium, Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques, brings together art historians, curators, and conservators to explore artists’ writings about materials and techniques.  Robyn Hodgkins, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Trinity University in San Antonio, will visit us to discuss modern and contemporary oil paint formulations.  In particular, Hodgkins will look at two van Gogh paintings from the National Gallery of Art and then a closer look at a new category of oil paint, water mixable oils (WMOs).  DMA Director of Exhibition and Museum Design Jessica Harden will provide a ‘behind-the-scenes’ look at how exhibition design impacts the artwork and visitor experience.

 Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University


Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University

In March, fellows have the unique opportunity to tour the eclectic art collection of local collector James A. Ledbetter which includes African, Asian and Modern European works. DFW area university faculty from SMU and UT Dallas will present their contributions to local scholarship including Dr. Michael Corris who will showcase his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art.  A variety of topics will be presented by our UT Dallas fellows including Leslie Reid, who will give a gallery talk at the DMA on Modernist architecture of universal art museums focusing on architect Edward Larrabee Barnes’ design.

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

 

We have an exciting spring ahead and hope that all of you can join us!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

 

 

EODIAH Upcoming Programs

Workshop Talk
Dr. Adam Herring, Chair of Art History, Southern Methodist University

Turntable: Inca Cuzco’s ‘Terrace of Leisure’
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Gallery Talk
Jessica Harden, Director of Exhibition and Museum Design, The Dallas Museum of Art

Exhibition and Museum Design at The Dallas Museum of Art
At The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Workshop Talk
Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University

A closer look at modern and contemporary oil paint formulations
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Workshop Talk
Poe Johnson, UT Dallas Fellow

The Great Chain of Being Black: Images of the Lynched Black Body as Participatory Fandom
At UT Dallas, ATEC 2.705
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

O’Donnell Institute Symposium

Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques
Open to the public
Please RSVP

 

Workshop Talk
Dr. Allan Antliff, UT Dallas Research Fellow

Pedagogical Subversion: The ‘Un-American’ Graphics of Kevin C. Pyle
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Please visit our website for all of our upcoming programs.

Mark Rosen, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

In November 2016, Mark Rosen presented new research on Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s (now lost) fourteenth-century mappamundi at the Andrew Ladis Trecento Conference held at Tulane University in New Orleans. His most recent publication is “Jachia ben Mehmet and the Medici Court,” in an volume entitled The Grand Ducal Medici and Their Archive (1537–1743) edited by Alessio Assonitis and Brian Sandberg (Turnhout: Brepols, 2016). In the spring 2017 semester, Dr. Rosen is teaching a graduate course on the social history of art and will be presenting at the Renaissance Society of America Conference in Chicago.

Allan Antliff, EODIAH Visiting Research Scholar

 

Allan Antliff, Associate Professor, Art History and Visual Studies, University of Victoria

Allan Antliff, Associate Professor, Art History and Visual Studies, University of Victoria

“Glamourized,” a critical appraisal of post-modernist trends in contemporary art by EODIAH Visiting Scholar Allan Antliff, has just appeared in New Perspectives for Contemporary Music in the 21st Century, Daniel Biro and Kai Johannes Polzhofer, eds. (Hofheim, Germany: Wolke Verlag, 2016).

While in residence at the Institute Allan Antliff will be completing his latest book, Aesthetics of Tension: Anarchist Currents in Contemporary ArtAesthetics of Tension explores anarchist art production across an array of mediums, including digital art, video and film, painting, sculpture, installations, performance, audio works, ‘zines’, graphics, and architecture. This art, Antliff argues, thrives on qualities of contestation at the same time as it seeks to intensify ruptures that are generative, unleashing imaginative freedoms that find their grounding in the artwork’s relational power and communicative efficacy. Addressing issues such as racism, biotechnology, surveillance, war, the economics of art, collective art making, and gentrification, Aesthetics of Tension will foreground a body of work steeped in challenges to the status quo.

Joseph R. Hartman, EODIAH Research Fellow

Joseph Hartman

Joseph Hartman

EODIAH Research Fellow Joseph R. Hartman received his PhD in Art History from Southern Methodist University December 17, 2016. After graduation, Hartman traveled to Cuba to meet with professionals and to document monuments in Havana, Santa Clara, and Trinidad for his current book manuscript The Dictator’s Dreamscape: Building Machado’s Cuba. The book examines the public works program of U.S.-backed Dictator Gerardo Machado (in power 1925-1933). It reconsiders Cuban art, architecture, and visual culture within broader histories of nation building, globalization, and the rise of U.S. hegemony in the Western hemisphere during the twentieth century. With generous financial and scholarly support from the Edith O’Donnell Institute, Hartman will complete the book manuscript in the coming spring.

Paul Galvez, EODIAH Research Fellow Curates Exhibition at galerie frank elbaz

Julije Knifer, 21-25 XI 10-16X 21-25X 10-15XI. 4-7 XII 10-13.XII.81, 1981, Graphite on paper, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. / 50 x 65 cm

Julije Knifer, 21-25 XI 10-16X 21-25X 10-15XI. 4-7 XII 10-13.XII.81, 1981, Graphite on paper, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. / 50 x 65 cm

Martin Barré, Sheila Hicks, Julije Knifer, Mangelos, Bernard Piffaretti

Meandering, Abstractly

curated by Paul Galvez at galerie frank elbaz, Dallas

January 14 – March 25, 2017

 

For decades after MoMA’s 1936 exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art Alfred Barr’s iconic diagram was the image of modern art’s history: a series of –isms hung on a genealogical tree, from post-Impressionism to Surrealism. In 2013, the same institution envisaged a 21st century update, more interlacing network than hereditary branches. Meandering, Abstractly re-visits postwar European abstraction via less well-known routes:  Zagreb and Peru, instead of New York and Düsseldorf.

The show’s basic question is this:  how did artists like Julije Knifer, Mangelos, Martin Barré, Bernard Piffaretti, and Sheila Hicks come to re-interpret the legacies of Malevitch, Mondrian, Max Bill, and Josef Albers in such unexpected and highly original ways, leading them to produce works whose extraordinary inventiveness is due in no small part to the unique historical and geographic circumstances of their creation.

Paul Galvez holds a PhD from Columbia University. He is a Research Fellow at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, where he works on modern art from the nineteenth century to the present.  His writing has appeared in journals such as ArtforumCahiers d’art moderne, and October as well as in several monographs: Courbet: A Dream of Modern Art (Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, 2011); Martin Barré: the decisive years (Éditions Dilecta, Paris, 2013), an exhibition catalogue published the same year as a 2-person show he curated on the work of Barré and R.H. Quaytman at Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris; Brice Marden: Graphite Drawings (Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 2014); David Balula: Ember Harbor (Shelter Press, 2014); Bernard Piffaretti, 1980-2016 – Catalogue Raisonnable (MAMCO, Geneva, 2016); and Bernard Piffaretti, Works: 1986-2015(Karma, New York, 2016).

 

Read more at the gallery’s website.

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

José Clemente Orozco The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926 Oil on canvas Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm) Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

José Clemente Orozco
The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926
Oil on canvas
Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm)
Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

 

México 1900–1950 Highlights New Narratives in Mexico’s Modern Art History

It’s a happy new year. This month the DMA issued its press release publicly announcing the exciting addition of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde to the Museum’s exhibition schedule. The exhibition, curated by Dr. Agustín Arteaga, opened at the Grand Palais in Paris this past October, where it has received great public and critical acclaim. México 1900–1950 offers a renewed vision of Mexican art from the first half of the 20th century through a faithful account of the ambitious spirit of this major period of national artistic history. The impact of cultural activity in Mexico from the end of the long civil war (the Mexican revolt of 1910–20) until the beginning of the 1950s was indeed a singular phenomenon and can be seen in the works presented in México 1900–1950.
The exhibition, with the DMA serving as the only North American venue and the only venue outside of Paris, has already received tremendous support from the DMA community in the brief weeks since its inclusion in the DMA lineup of exhibitions this spring, and the DMA looks forward to inviting our community to discover more of the fabric of Mexico’s art history beginning March 12.

 

 

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Dr. Chu Comes to Dallas

On November 29, NEA Chairman Jane Chu visited Dallas as the featured speaker for the Dallas Arts District Community Breakfast. Afterwards, she visited the DMA with Gary Gibbs, Executive Director of the Texas Commission on the Arts, for a tour led by Agustín Arteaga of the Conservation Studio and the African and Contemporary Art galleries, with senior curators Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and Gavin Delahunty, The Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, offering commentary. Her visit ended with a presentation by Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education and Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences, and Ingrid Van Haastrecht, Director of Development Operations and Analysis, on the progress of the NEA grant the DMA received to conduct an evaluation of the South Dallas community and how they engage with the Museum. Dr. Chu’s visit was chronicled the following day in this article in the Dallas Morning News.

 

 

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

After four and a half groundbreaking years at the DMA, Mark Leonard, the Museum’s first Chief Conservator, will be retiring—for the second time—to the sun-drenched California desert. Leonard stepped down in 2010 as the Head of the Paintings Conservation Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum to pursue his career as an artist. His DMA appointment in 2012 signaled the initial phase of the development of the Museum’s conservation program, which included the addition of staff and the renovation of its on-site spaces to include a paintings conservation studio.

While at the DMA, Leonard carefully stewarded the collection and built a robust and comprehensive conservation program. He was responsible for carrying out major treatments on over 60 works of art, restoring a range of works, from a rare early Renaissance Spanish panel painting, to Jacques Blanchard’s 17th-century oil painting Zeus and Semele, to a work by Texas artist Julian Onderdonk that had been confined to storage for decades because of its poor state of preservation. Leonard also collaborated with private collectors on the study and care of their collections in order to present the work in the Museum galleries for all to see.

Under Leonard’s direction, the DMA also established a network of regional conservation partnerships with museums in North Texas and local universities to collaborate on conservation research and the study of individual works. Although he will surely be missed, the impact of his time at the DMA will not soon be forgotten—and evidence of it will continue to be seen throughout our institution.

 

On View at The Dallas Museum of Art

DMA_Logo_Print_CMYK_2Color

On view at the DMA this Winter/Spring:

 

Nicolas Party: Pathway

Through February 5, 2017

Concourse

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

México 1900 – 1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

March 12-July 16, 2017

DMA Co-organized; U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Art and Nature in the Middle Ages

Through March 19, 2017

Chilton II

U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion
May 21–August 20, 2017

Chilton II

 

Visions of America: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art
May 28–September 4, 2017

Chilton II

 

Waxed: Batik from Java

Through September 10, 2017

Level 3

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail

Through November 12, 2017

Focus II

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

SMU Comini Lecture Series

SMU Comini Lecture Series:

Nina Dubin, Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

Love, Trust, Risk: Painting the “Papered Century”

Monday January 30, O’Donnell Lecture Hall, Meadows School of the Arts, SMU, 5 pm

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, “The Love Letter,” c. 1770

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, “The Love Letter,” c. 1770

The Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, Lectures

Exhibitions

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

The Festival Book for San Fernando: Celebrating Sainthood in Baroque Seville

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

Mar. 12-Jun. 11, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Events

Artist Demonstration: Drawing Tools

Mar. 10, 6:00 pm

Sandy Rodriguez

Meadows Museum

 

Lectures

Lecture: Rafael Barradas and the Development of the Spanish Avant-Garde

Jan. 19, 6:00 pm

Jed Morse

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture Series: Reflecting on Ribera: Art and Culture in Spain and Spanish Naples, 1600-1700

February 3, 10:30 am

February 10, 10:30 am

February 24, 10:30 am

March 3, 10:30 am

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, SMU

Meadows Museum

The four lectures in this series examine the world and work of the Spanish-born artist Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652), who is the subject of the upcoming Meadows Museum exhibition Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera. By carefully analyzing specific artworks by Ribera and his contemporaries, the lectures situate Ribera within the broader context of the global Iberian empire, in which his chosen hometown of Naples played an integral role. Some of the themes examined include Ribera’s confrontation with the legacy of Caravaggio and Domenichino, his penchant for violent scenes of martyrdom and suffering, the appeal of his stark realism, and his creation of images that were both effective religious objects and cutting-edge contemporary artworks. Coffee and pastries are served in the Founders Room before each lecture, from 10 to 10:25 a.m. This program is made possible by gifts from The Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation and The Eugene McDermott Foundation.

Read more on this lecture.

 

Lecture: Retired Art History Professor Turns to Crime (Writing)

Feb. 23, 6:00 pm

Alessandra Comini

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Velázquez, Curator to the King

Mar. 2, 6:00 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Juan Carreño’s Charles II and the Spanish Hall of Mirrors

Mar. 3, 12:15 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Sublime and Grotesque: Ribera and the Art of Drawing

Mar. 10, 10:30 am

Edward Payne

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Drawings are Paintings

Mar. 31, 12:15 pm

Mary Vernon

Meadows Museum

UNT Art Historian Kelly Donahue-Wallace Scholar Report

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor, Department of Art History, University of North Texas

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor, Department of Art History, University of North Texas

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor of Art History at the University of North Texas celebrates the publication of her book Jerónimo Antonio Gil and the Idea of the Spanish Enlightenment. Examining the career of a largely unstudied eighteenth-century engraver, this book establishes Jerónimo Antonio Gil, a man immersed within the complicated culture and politics of the Spanish empire, as a major figure in the history of both Spanish and Mexican art. Donahue-Wallace examines Gil as an artist, tracing his education, entry into professional life, appointment to the Mexico City mint, and foundation of the Royal Academy of the Three Noble Arts of San Carlos. She analyzes the archival and visual materials he left behind and, most importantly, she considers the ideas, philosophies, and principles of his era, those who espoused them, and how Gil responded to them. Although frustrated by resistance from the faculty and colleagues he brought to his academy, Gil would leave a lasting influence on the Mexican art scene as local artists continued to benefit from his legacy at the Mexican academy.  The book is published by University of New Mexico Press, 2017.

The Gallery at UTA Presents Adriana Corral and Leigh Merrill

Leigh Merrill, Pink Corner 2016, pigment print, 21 x 23 inches framed, image courtesy of Liliana Bloch Gallery

Leigh Merrill, Pink Corner 2016, pigment print, 21 x 23 inches framed, image courtesy of Liliana Bloch Gallery

Adriana Corral and Leigh Merrill

 January 17 – February 18, 2017

Reception Friday, January 20, 5:30 to 8 pm

 

The Gallery at UTA is pleased to present two concurrent exhibitions showcasing artists Adriana Corral (San Antonio) and Leigh Merrill (Dallas). Corral’s minimalist site—specific installations present troubling issues affecting society: human rights violations, injustice, victimized individuals and lack of reform are themes she often addresses in her work. Growing up in El Paso, Texas heightened her awareness of the nearby ‘atrocities in Juarez’ that ‘echo human tragedies around the world’ and inspired her to research and address complex socio—political crises in her art. Merrill’s photographic and video pieces examine the urban landscape through otherworldly vignettes made by digitally combining real—world images to create imaginary spaces. She touches upon themes of desire, fiction and beauty in her work as she illuminates the way our environments reference other places and times to reveal “a culture of perpetual longing.” Together, Corral and Merrill create a thought—provoking exhibition that utilizes artistic language to respond to complex conceptual issues.

 

Read more at The Gallery at UTA’s website.

Crow Collection of Asian Art Upcoming Exhibition and Events

Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney Perspectives 1 2015 Photography and ink on xuan paper 24 3/4 x 58 in Private Collection Image is courtesy of the artists

Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney
Perspectives 1
2015
Photography and ink on xuan paper
24 3/4 x 58 in
Private Collection
Image is courtesy of the artists

 

CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART PREMIERES LANDSCAPE RELATIVITIES: THE COLLABORATIVE WORKS OF ARNOLD CHANG AND MICHAEL CHERNEY FEB. 25-JUNE 25, 2017

Organized by the Crow Collection in Dallas, this exhibition blurs the lines between photography and the art of Chinese ink painting

The collaborative works of a renowned painter and an acclaimed photographer are the focus of Landscape Relativities: The Collaborative Works of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney. The Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas will premiere the exhibition Feb. 25 – June 25, 2017 in its Gallery One exhibition space in the Dallas Arts District.

In this exhibition, painter Arnold Chang (Zhang Hong; b. 1954) and photographer Michael Cherney (Qiu Mai; b. 1969) stretch and play with the relationship between the two media of painting and photography and the history and principles of Chinese ink painting. The exhibition – organized by the Crow Collection of Asian Art and curated by Dr. Jacqueline Chao, the Crow Collection’s Curator of Asian Art – will feature a selection of both their individual works along with new collaborative pieces to be exhibited publicly for the first time.

Read more at the Crow Collection of Asian Art website.

 

Other activities celebrate the exhibition

 

During the exhibition at the Crow Collection of Asian Art, a slate of supporting experiences will be presented for both the public and Friends of the Crow Collection, including:

 

Members’ Reception

March 2, 2017 6p.m. – 8p.m.

Exclusively for Friends of the Crow Collection, this cocktail and hors d’ouerves reception features an artist’s talk, tour and and mingling with artists Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang, other supporters, the museum’s curatorial team. Membership starts at just $65; to join visit crowcollection.org.

Artist 2 Artist Conversation

March 3, 2017 6p.m. – 11p.m.

This conversation experience was created to allow local artists and enthusiasts to interact directly with artists Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang to explore ideas around collaboration. Free and open to the public, seating limited and reservations required. Cash bar. Visit crowcollection.org for more information.

 

Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family SOLUNA International Music and Arts Festival Collaboration

May 16-June 4, 2017

Grammy® Award-winning composer and pianist Henri Scars Struck will create a meditative soundscape, confronting tradition and contemporary art practice, and Eastern and Western sensibilities in connection with the exhibition. This project is co-commissioned by the Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family SOLUNA International Music and Arts Festival. For more information visit https://www.mydso.com/SOLUNA.

TCU’s Annual Nancy Quarles Stuck Art History Lecture

TCU logo

1st Annual Nancy Quarles Stuck Art History Lecture

Professor Melissa Hyde, University of Florida

“What Ladies Do When They Paint for Their Own Amusement?” The Highs and Lows of Pastel Painting in Eighteenth-Century France

Monday, February 6, 6 pm

TCU Moudy North, Room 132

UNT Art Education and Art History Spring 2017 Lectures

Department of Art Education and Art History Lecture Series, University of North Texas, Spring 2017

 

February 2

Conversations: Art, Politics and North Texas

Sara-Jayne Parsons, TCU Art Galleries

Giovanni Valderas, Kirk Hopper Fine Art

6-7:30pm, Art 101

 

February 6

Jack Davis Endowed Lecture in Art Education

Kevin Tavin, Aalto University, Finland

6-7:30pm, Art 223

 

March 2

Conversations: Art, Politics and North Texas

Darryl Ratcliff, Ash Studios and Michelada Think Tank

6-7:30pm, Art 101

 

March 9

Jobs in the Visual Arts and Design: Panels and Workshops

3:30-8:30pm, Art 101 and Art 223

 

March 23

The ‘Desire of Deeds’: Sensual Documents and the Affective Performance of the Medieval Archive

Carol Symes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

5pm, Art 223

 

March 24

AVISTA North Texas Medieval Graduate Student Symposium

8am-5pm, Art 101

 

April 6

Sumerian Art in the Modernist Avant-Garde

Zinab Bahrani, Columbia University

5pm, Art 223

 

April 10

Art History Writing Competition Finalists

5pm, Art 223

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Exhibitions

LOUIS KAHN: THE POWER OF ARCHITECTURE

March 26, 2017 to June 25, 2017

Louis Kahn Building

The American architect Louis Kahn (1901–1974) is regarded as one of the great master builders of the 20th century. With complex spatial compositions and a choreographic mastery of light, Kahn created buildings of archaic beauty and powerful universal symbolism. Among his most important works are the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959–65), the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh (1962–83) and the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas (1966–72). The exhibition Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, organized by the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), is the first major retrospective of Kahn’s work in two decades.

The exhibition encompasses an unprecedented and diverse range of architectural models, original drawings, photographs and films. All of Kahn’s important projects are extensively documented—-from his early urban planning concepts and single-family houses to monumental late works such as the Roosevelt Memorial in New York City (1973/74), posthumously completed in October 2012. The view of Kahn’s architectural oeuvre is augmented by a selection of watercolors, pastels and charcoal drawings created during his travels, which document his skill as an artist and illustrator. Highlights of the exhibition include a 12-foot-high model of the spectacular City Tower designed for Philadelphia (1952–57), as well as previously unpublished film footage shot by Nathanial Kahn, the son of Louis Kahn and director of the film My Architect. Interviews with architects such as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Peter Zumthor and Sou Fujimoto underscore the current significance of Kahn’s work, which is being rediscovered and made accessible to a wide public audience with this exhibition.

This exhibition is organized by the Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. The exhibition is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional support is provided by The Beck Group.

Read more about the Kimbell’s exhibitions on their website.

Lectures

 

FEBRUARY 8, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

The Kimbell on the Road: Velázquez to Vigée le Brun

Nancy E. Edwards, Curator of European Art/Head of Academic Services, Kimbell Art Museum

 

FEBRUARY 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

Rembrandt, the Jews and “That Portrait” at the Kimbell

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

 

FEBRUARY 11, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Erik Skjolsvik, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 1, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

El Greco’s Portrait of Francisco de Pisa and the Instability of Portraiture in Renaissance Spain

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, Southern Methodist University,

Dallas

 

March 4, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Letitia Huckaby, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

As Much Taste and More Beauty: The Irish Country House Revealed

Robert O’Byrne, Fine and Decorative Arts Writer, Navan, County Meath, Ireland

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017

Symposium

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

SunRa 2016 Stanley Whitney SunRa 2016, 2016 Oil on linen 96 x 96 inches Courtesy of team gallery

SunRa 2016
Stanley Whitney
SunRa 2016, 2016
Oil on linen
96 x 96 inches
Courtesy of team gallery

 

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents FOCUS: Stanley Whitney

January 21-April 2, 2017

The FOCUS series is organized by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth for the Director’s Council, a group that supports acquisitions at the Museum. The series features three solo exhibitions annually, organized by Assistant Curator Alison Hearst.

Since the mid-1970s, Stanley Whitney has investigated the intricate possibilities of color and form in the realm of abstract painting. Whitney’s signature style features multicolored, irregular grids on square canvases. Taking the essentialist grid of minimalism as his cue, his configurations are loose, uneven geometric lattices comprised of vibrant stacked color blocks that vary in hue, shape, and the handling of the paint. Whitney also utilizes color as subject, and his paintings often refer to literature, music, places, and other artists, connections that are bolstered in his titles.

Working without preparatory materials, Whitney combines balance and intuition in his approach to painting, as each color block is painted sequentially in relation to the ongoing arrangement. This process is expressive, improvisational, and can be linked to jazz, which continually inspires the artist. As Whitney has stated, “The way that it’s a little offbeat, polyrhythmic; the way that things move. Nothing’s straight. Nothing’s regular. Everything’s a little crooked. And I think that’s really what comes out of the music. It comes out of the beat, it comes out of how people walk, the way people wear their hat, just a little off. I think about all of those kinds of things and want them in the painting.”

FOCUS: Stanley Whitney features new work by the artist, including three large-scale paintings.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

 

Firemen March 6 1985 Donald Sultan Firemen March 6 1985, 1985 Latex and tar on tile over Masonite 96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Firemen March 6 1985
Donald Sultan
Firemen March 6 1985, 1985
Latex and tar on tile over Masonite
96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings

February 19–April 23, 2017

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the first exhibition focusing on Donald Sultan’s seminal Disaster Paintings series, including eleven signature paintings from 1984 to 1990. Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings is organized by the Modern’s assistant curator, Alison Hearst. The exhibition will be on view at the Lowe Art Museum, Miami, September 29–December 23, 2016; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, February 19–April 23, 2017; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, May 26–September 4, 2017; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, September 23–December 31, 2017; and Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, January 24–May 13, 2018.

Artist Donald Sultan’s career began with his first solo exhibition in 1977 in New York City, when he was just 26 years old, and he rose to prominence in the 1980s. A painter, sculptor, and printmaker, Sultan is regarded for his ongoing large-scale painted still lifes featuring structural renderings of fruit, flowers, and other everyday objects, often abstracted and set against a rich, black background; but he is also noted for his significant industrial landscape series that began in the early 1980s entitled the Disaster Paintings, on which the artist worked for nearly a decade. While Sultan’s still lifes depict and strengthen fragile and ephemeral objects, the Disaster Paintings often illustrate robust, man-made structures, such as factories and train cars, that exhibit a level of fragility in their propensity to be unhinged by catastrophic events. Distinguished for combining such subject matter with industrial materials, such as tar and Masonite tiles, the Disaster Paintings exemplify in both media and concept the vulnerability of the most progressive manufactured elements of modern culture.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramic Competition

The University of Dallas is proud to host the 2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramic Competition. The exhibition will gather contemporary ceramic artworks, both functional and sculptural, from 45 artists of the Southwest region. These featured works have been selected by this year’s juror, internationally acclaimed ceramic artist and professor, Virginia Marsh, who is also currently an artist-in-residence at the university. The opening reception is Monday, February 13, at 6:30pm–9:00pm, with a lecture presentation by Virginia Marsh, followed by the presentation of two “Best of Show” awards. The exhibition is free and open to the public from January 18 until March 13, 2017.

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery will host the 2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramics Competition from Wednesday, Jan. 18, to Monday, March 13.  Marsh will also present a lecture detailing the featured works selected for the exhibit on Monday, Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the Art History Auditorium. A reception and awards presentation will follow from 7 to 9 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the regional ceramic exhibit has become one of the premier competitions for both new and established ceramicists — 45 separate artists will be featured in this year’s exhibit, which provides visitors an overview of contemporary ceramic art from throughout the Southwest.

Before coming to the University of Dallas, Marsh taught ceramics for 20 years at the University of Louisville, served as editorial adviser to Chilton Book Company and published numerous articles and photos of her own work.

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is located in the Art History Building at the corner of Gorman Drive and Haggar Circle on the University of Dallas campus at 1845 E. Northgate Drive in Irving. The gallery, which is part of the Haggerty Art Village, is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.Saturday noon to 5 p.m. and Sunday12:30 to 5 p.m. For more gallery information, visit www.udallas.edu/gallery or call 972-721-5087.

Brookhaven College Presents Jana Perez

Jana Perez, Objectified, collage, 43 x 43.

Jana Perez, Objectified, collage, 43 x 43.

Brookhaven College   School of the Arts   Art Department   Studio Gallery

Jana Perez

1.9 – 2.3.2017   M – F  9 – 5

reception 1.27.20176-8 pm

 

Exhibitions, gallery lectures, and receptions are free and open to the public.

Brookhaven College is located at 3939 Valley View Lane, between Midway Road and Marsh Lane in Farmers Branch.

The Forum Gallery is located in Building F, Room F101, open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Park in the P4 or P5 parking lot.

For more information about  exhibitions, contact David Newman, gallery director, at 972-860-4101 or at dNewman@dcccd.edu.

3939 Valley View Lane     Farmers Branch, TX 75244-4997    V 972.860.4101    F 972.860.4385

Fine Silver: Looking at Silver through the eye of an Auction Specialist

Join Karen Rigdon, M.A., Director, Decorative Arts & Design/Silver & Vertu, at Heritage Auctions for a daylong seminar examining 19th and 20th century silver.  This seminar will cover important aspects of Silver Collecting & Connoisseurship, using the Heritage Archives and pieces from the April Fine Silver & Vertu auction, to guide the discussion.

  • Highlights from the Heritage Archive
  • Collecting trends: Then and Now
  • How to look at silver: identify construction techniques, judge quality, establish origin
  • Examination of work by the finest 19th and 20th centuries silversmiths
  • Handling session

When: Monday, February 6, 2017, 9:00 – 5:00

Where:  Heritage Auction Galleries, 1518 Slocum St., Dallas,

Cost: $125.00 for ISA members; $150.00 for non-members

To register: Send a check to PO Box 600935   Dallas, Texas   OR

Contact Susan Sturdivant, PhD., ISA CAPP   214/522-0460; HPAppraiser@aol.com

Internship Opportunity at galerie frank elbaz

SPRING GALLERY INTERNSHIP
Intern responsibilities may include correspondence, assisting at openings and gallery events, research, press communication, speaking with visitors, gallery upkeep, and other miscellaneous tasks tailored to intern’s particular interests. Candidates should have completed a BA or be in the process of completing a MA in Art History or a related field with a particular interest in contemporary art, possess strong computer and communication skills and be willing to commit to two to three full days per week over the Spring Semester. Proficiency in Microsoft Office and proficiency in other languages are a plus. Intern must notify gallery of planned absences at the start of internship. Intern may choose to be compensated or earn course credit. Candidates may send a letter of interest and current CV to elizabeth@galeriefrankelbaz.com with the subject line ‘Spring Internship 2017.’
galerie frank elbaz opened in 2002 in the district of Le Marais in Paris. The gallery promotes French creation by presenting work by Davide Balula, Rainier Lericolais, Bernard Piffaretti and more. Simultaneously, it offers a foresight into the American scene, showing works of artists such as Sheila Hicks, Kaz Oshiro, Mungo Thomson or Blair Thurman. Over the years, the gallery has focused on rediscovering historical artists such as Wallace Berman and Jay DeFeo, as well as artists from the Zagreb conceptual scene, such as the Gorgona Group (Julije Knifer, Mangelos, Josip Vanista, etc.) or Tomislav Gotovac and Mladen Stilinovic. The gallery regularly invites curators or artists to propose exhibitions projects. It participates in many international art fairs such as Frieze Art Fair (New York), Fiac (Paris), Art Basel (Basel) and Art Basel Miami Beach (Miami). In 2016, galerie frank elbaz opened a second space in Dallas, Texas.

Exhibition Highlight: Mason Bryant at The Reading Room

pigment extracted from Yves Klein's "Table Bleu" impregnated as tracing

pigment extracted from Yves Klein’s “Table Bleu” impregnated as tracing

Mordants, by Mason Bryant

January 14 – February 11

Mordants, an exhibition by Fort Worth artist Mason Bryant will open Saturday, January 14 from 6 to 8 pm at The Reading Room. A mordant is a dye fixative, a chemical substance that combines with a dye or stain to permanently adhere it to a fabric or tissue. Bryant appropriates and recontextualizes gestures, texts and images of artists from the past to conjure new forms.It is a kind of alchemy.The exhibit continues through February 11, 2017.

Bryant lives and works in Fort Worth. He received an MFA from Texas Christian University and a BA from University of Texas at Arlington. His work has been shown at Conduit Gallery, Black Lodge Gallery and Fort Worth Contemporary Arts.

http://thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com, Karen Weiner 214 952 4109