Kimbell Art Museum Presents Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

Kahn at the Kimbell

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; constructed 1969–72 North portico with reflecting pool Louis I. Kahn (1901–1974), architect Photograph: Robert LaPrelle © 2013 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth

THE KIMBELL’S ARCHITECT COMES TO LIFE IN AN IN-DEPTH EXHIBITON

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

March 26–June 25, 2017
On view in the Louis Kahn Building

 

Louis I. Kahn (American, 1901–1974), architect of the Kimbell Art Museum, is regarded as one of the great master builders of the twentieth century. With complex spatial compositions and a choreographic mastery of light, Kahn created buildings of archaic beauty and powerful universal symbolism. In addition to the Kimbell (1966–72), his most important works include the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959–65), and the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh (1962–83). The exhibition Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, organized by Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), is the first major retrospective of Kahn’s work in two decades.

In addition to The Power of Architecture, the Kimbell Art Musuem is the sole venue for a complementary exhibition, The Color of Light, The Treasury of Shadows: Pastels by Louis I. Kahn from the Collections of His Children. Admission to both special exhibitions is free.

“The Kimbell’s Kahn-designed building is acknowledged the world over as an architectural masterpiece,” commented Eric M. Lee, director of the Kimbell Art Museum. “Visitors who come to this exhibition will get know Kahn, the architect, and follow him on the thrilling journey that led to the vision for the Kimbell Art Museum.”

The exhibition encompasses an unprecedented and diverse range of architectural models, original drawings, photographs and films. All of Kahn’s important projects are extensively documented—from his early urban planning concepts and single-family houses to monumental late works such as the Roosevelt Memorial in New York City (1973/74), posthumously completed in October 2012. The view of Kahn’s architectural oeuvre is augmented by a selection of watercolors, pastels and charcoal drawings created during his travels, which document his skill as an artist and illustrator. Highlights of the exhibition include a 12-foot-high model of the spectacular City Tower designed for Philadelphia (1952–57), as well as previously unpublished film footage shot by Nathanial Kahn, the son of Louis Kahn and director of the film My Architect. Interviews with architects such as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Peter Zumthor and Sou Fujimoto underscore the current significance of Kahn’s work, which is being rediscovered and made accessible to a wide public audience with this exhibition.

A biographical introduction to the exhibition is followed by six thematic sections that illustrate the development of Kahn’s work over time and explore Kahn’s quest for origins: in architecture and art, in the natural sciences, and in the observation of human behavior and society. The first section of the exhibition, entitled City, examines the architect’s relationship to Philadelphia—his adopted home after immigrating to the United States—which became a laboratory for the development of his own urbanistic and architectural principles. Science demonstrates how Kahn studied the structural laws inherent in nature as a means of establishing a foundation for the renewal of architecture. Landscape emphasizes that nature was not only a source of inspiration for Kahn but also increasingly important as a context for his buildings. House illustrates that Kahn’s desire to create a stronger connection between architecture and the surrounding environment also formed the basis of his residential designs; he regarded the house as an archetype and starting point for his understanding of architecture and community. Kahn’s increasing success was accompanied by the evolution of an architecture that was closely linked to the timeless foundations of traditional building, yet radically innovative and future-oriented in terms of technology and construction. The underlying ideal of an Eternal Present resulted from Kahn’s intense engagement with architectural history and archetypical structures, vividly documented in his travel drawings from Italy, Greece and Egypt. The culmination of the exhibition is represented by the section Community, which expresses how essential the social significance of architecture was to Kahn and how he derived new forms for public buildings from it. Taken as a whole, the six themes of the exhibition reveal a new view of Louis Kahn’s oeuvre that defies the common classifications of modernism or postmodernism.

Kahn’s uniqueness lies in his synthesis of the major conceptual traditions of modern architecture—from the École des Beaux-Arts and the constructive rationalism of the 19th century to the Arts and Crafts movement and Bauhaus modernism—enhanced by the consideration of indigenous, non-Western building traditions. Kahn gained important impulses from architectural movements such as metabolism and brutalism. He anticipated aspects of building that are highly relevant today, including a return to local resources and “soft” factors such as air, light and water. He saw himself as part of a tradition that spanned thousands of years and that understood architecture not only as a means of satisfying utilitarian needs, but as an instrument of artistic speculation and a vehicle for contemplating nature, history and human community.

Convinced that contemporary architects could—and should—produce buildings that were as monumental and as spiritually inspiring as the ancient ruins of Greece and Egypt, Kahn devoted his career to the uncompromising pursuit of formal perfection and emotional expression. Working with simple materials, notably brick and concrete, Kahn applied his principles to create buildings instilled with the spiritual qualities he desired through a masterful sense of space and light. He employed this approach to create his first masterpiece, the Salk Institute (1959–65). Kahn’s interest in the relationship of architecture to its location and landscape is one of the most magical elements of the Salk Institute, an extraordinarily inspiring sequence of buildings perched on a cliff above the Pacific Ocean. This interest was equally important to his campus buildings at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania (1960–65), the Exeter Library, New Hampshire (1967–72), and the Yale Center for British Art (1968–74). Striving for perfection, Kahn’s development during this period culminated in another masterpiece, the Kimbell Art Museum, which is still regarded as an exceptionally compelling and empathetic environment for displaying painting and sculpture.

The exhibition is organized by Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. It is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional sponsorship support is provided by The Beck Group. Promotional support is provided by the American Airlines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and NBC5.

Complementary Exhibition

The Color of Light, The Treasury of Shadows:
Pastels by Louis I. Kahn from the Collections of His Children

This intimate exhibition presents a selection of pastels dating from a three-month period in 1950–51 when Kahn was Architect in Residence at the American Academy in Rome. While there, he had the opportunity to travel and sketch the great historic monuments and public spaces of Italy, Greece and Egypt. Away from the daily concerns of his architectural practice, his eye and spirit were free to absorb the essence of these places. In pastels that have been acknowledged as the most sublime examples of his drawing, he captured the vivid colors that light and shadow make as they illuminate the ancient sites.

Special thanks to the children of Louis I. Kahn, Sue Ann Kahn, Alexandra Tyng and Nathaniel Kahn, for generously lending their works for this exhibition.

Kimbell Art Museum

The Kimbell Art Museum, owned and operated by the Kimbell Art Foundation, is internationally renowned for both its collections and for its architecture. The Kimbell’s collections range in period from antiquity to the 20th century and include European masterpieces by artists such as Fra Angelico, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Poussin, Velázquez, Monet, Picasso and Matisse; important collections of Egyptian and classical antiquities; and the art of Asia, Africa and the Ancient Americas.

The exhibition is organized by Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. It is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional sponsorship support is provided by The Beck Group. Promotional support is provided by the American Airlines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and NBC5.

The Museum’s 1972 building, designed by the American architect Louis I. Kahn, is widely regarded as one of the outstanding architectural achievements of the modern era. A second building, designed by world-renowned Italian architect Renzo Piano, opened in 2013 and now provides space for special exhibitions, dedicated classrooms and a 289-seat auditorium with excellent acoustics for music.

*Admission to Louis Kahn. The Power of Architecture is FREE **Admission is always FREE to view the Museum’s permanent collection.

Visit the Kimbell Art Museum online at: kimbellart.org, Facebook.com/kimbellart and Twitter.com/kimbellart

Kimbell Art Museum 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, TX 76107 www.kimbellart.org Kimbell Art Museum hours: Tuesdays–Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Friday, noon–8 p.m.; Sunday, noon–5 p.m.; closed Monday. For information, call 817-332-8451.

Kimbell Art Museum Programs & Lectures

Kimbell Lecture Hall  

Friday, April 21  6 pm, Lecture Louis I. Kahn: Light, Pastel, Eternity—Michael Lewis    

 

Wednesday, May 3  12:30 pm, Lecture From the “Three Strides” to Dharmic Order: Vishnu in Hindu Art—Steven E. Lindquist    

 

Saturday, May 13  10:30 am, Inaugural Lecture: A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection Duncan Phillips’s Modern Vision—Susan Behrends Frank    

 

Friday, June 16  6 pm, Lecture Monet Before Monet—Joachim Pissarro    

 

Friday, June 23  6 pm, Lecture Vienna 1900: Redefining Portraiture in the Age of Angst—Alessandra Comini  

 

Friday, July 7  6 pm, Lecture Georges Braque: Within Reach of the Hand—Karen Wilkin  

 

Films

SELECTED SUNDAYS, 2 pm

Kahn Auditorium

Free; no reservations required

 

JUNE 4

Pioneers of Modern Art series: Wassily Kandinsky (2004, 56 min.)

Selected films chronicle the careers of six celebrated masters whose work helped to define the major European art movements of the first half of the twentieth century. Different stories highlight the concerns that shaped their creative output, sweeping social and political changes during the period, and the enduring artistic legacies that influenced subsequent generations on both sides of the Atlantic. This series is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection.

 

JUNE 11

Pioneers of Modern Art series: Paul Klee (2004, 56 min.)

 

JULY 9

Pioneers of Modern Art series: Joan Miró (2004, 56 min.)

 

JULY 30

Pioneers of Modern Art series: Piet Mondrian (2004, 50 min.)

 

EDUCATION EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

 

Artful Readings

SELECTED FRIDAY EVENINGS, 5:30-7 pm

Participants explore connections in the literary and visual arts through group discussions and special presentations on selected books. Includes wine and light refreshments, as well as a 20% discount on Artful Readings selections in the Museum Shop. To be placed on a wait list, please call 817-332-8451, ext. 351, or email edassist@kimbellmuseum.org.

 

JUNE 9

You Say to Brick: The Life of Louis Kahn, by Wendy Lesser (2017)

 

JUNE 30

Pictures at an Exhibition: A Novel, by Sara Houghteling (2010)

Kimbell Art Museum’s Upcoming Exhibition, A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection

van Gogh, Vincent, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888, Oil on canvas 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in.; 72.39 x 90.805 cm. Acquired 1930. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Vincent Van Gogh, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888, Oil on canvas 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in.; 72.39 x 90.805 cm. Acquired 1930. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

 

A Modern Vision

European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection

MAY 14–AUGUST 13, 2017

 

A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection will bring to the Kimbell more than seventy paintings and sculptures from one of the world’s greatest museums of modern art. The Phillips Collection, housed in the historic residence of a wealthy Pittsburgh family that moved to Washington, DC, in the 1890s, is in fact America’s first museum devoted exclusively to modern art. Duncan Phillips (1886–1966), the grandson of a prominent Pennsylvania steel magnate, built the museum’s extraordinary collection. When the museum opened in 1921 as the Phillips Memorial Art Gallery, in honor of its founder’s father and brother, the collection included work by American Impressionists and their French counterparts. The collection’s original building will undergo a thorough restoration in 2017-18; during the renovation, A Modern Vision will allow audiences worldwide access to some of its greatest treasures.

After founding the museum, Phillips married the painter Marjorie Acker; through her, and through expanding friendships with living artists, his eyes were opened to new strains in painting and sculpture. He soon expanded the ambitions and the breadth of his collection, reaching out to acquire the works of such modern American painters as Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, John Marin, and Georgia O’Keeffe, but also significant holdings of works by French, Swiss, German, and Austrian artists of the period 1850-1950. Phillips referred to the museum as an “experiment station,” and today it retains the founder’s personal stamp in a gathering of art that combines tradition, idiosyncrasy, and daring. Art, in Phillips’s opinion, was meant to inspire: “Pictures send us back to life and to other arts with the ability to see beauty all about us as we go on our accustomed ways,” Phillips wrote. “Such a quickening of perceptions is surely worth cultivating.”

Central to Phillips’s taste was a preference for intense color and design. He was the first person, for instance, to gather a group of paintings by the Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko together as a unit—a move that anticipated and even inspired Rothko’s creation of decorative series. As Robert Hughes put it, “Phillips was in fact the complete optical collector. He craved color sensation, the delight and radiance and sensory intelligence that is broadcast by an art based on color. Color healed; it consoled, it gave access to Eden. He could not understand . . . why art should be expected to do anything else.”

Duncan Phillips was an iconoclast. He rejected old-fashioned art-historical ways of organizing a museum, believing that “the really good things of all ages and all periods could be brought together . . . with such delightful results that we recognize the special affinities of artists.” A Modern Vision begins with a spare and, in Phillips’s view, quintessentially “modern” still life painted by Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin in 1726 and concludes with a highly stylized bird painted by Georges Braque in 1956, purchased in the year of Phillips’s death. In between, viewers will encounter a stunning array from the nineteenth century that begins with such masters as Courbet, Ingres, and Manet and features such icons as Honoré Daumier’s The Uprising. Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings include a superb still life by Cézanne and an intensely colored painting of dancers by Degas, in addition to landscapes by Monet, Sisley, and Van Gogh—notably the latter’s celebrated Road Menders of 1890.

Critical to the exhibition are important selections from the carefully formed “units” of works by Phillips’s twentieth-century favorites: Pierre Bonnard, including The Open Window and The Palm; Wassily Kandinsky, including a canvas added to the collection by Phillips’s friend Katherine Dreier, Sketch I for Painting with White Border (Moscow); Pablo Picasso; Oskar Kokoschka; and Georges Braque—with some seven works, among them the elegiac Shower.

A Modern Vision gathers, in the words of Duncan Phillips, “congenial spirits among the artists from different parts of the world and from different periods of time” in an unprecedented array that will both inspire and delight, demonstrating that, as Phillips believed, “art is a universal language.”

Amon Carter Museum of American Art Exhibitions and Events

Guy Bourdin (1928–1991) Charles Jourdan, 1978, 1978 C-Print on Fujiflex paper © The Guy Bourdin Estate 2017 / Courtesy of Louise Alexander Gallery

Guy Bourdin (1928–1991)
Charles Jourdan, 1978, 1978
C-Print on Fujiflex paper
© The Guy Bourdin Estate 2017 / Courtesy of Louise Alexander Gallery

 

Special Exhibition:

 

The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology
June 3–September 3, 2017


The Polaroid Project
surveys the history of the innovative photographic company Polaroid and its intersection with art, science and technology during the second-half of the 20th century. Featuring a wide-ranging group of artists, the exhibition showcases the diversity of works produced over several decades. Organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, The Polaroid Project displays a variety of image sizes and formats produced over the years and the rich legacy of technological and artistic experimentation that the company enabled prior to its obsolescence.

 

Events:

Artist Talk with Gabriel Dawe and curator Maggie Adler

April 20, 6:30–7:30 p.m.

They will discuss his artwork, process, inspiration, and the installation of Plexus no. 34.

 

Gallery Talk with Kevin Vogel
April 27, 6:30–7:30 p.m.

President of Valley House Gallery & Sculpture Garden and Fine Art Estate will present a talk in conjunction with the exhibition Invented Worlds of Valton Tyler. Vogel will talk about the Texas artist’s life and work, the museum’s limited-edition book on the exhibition, and the fascinating story of how the Vogel family nurtured Tyler and his art, saving both from obscurity.

 

Artist Talk with Ellen Carey
June 15, 6:30–7:30 p.m.
In conjunction with the special exhibition The Polaroid Project, artist Ellen Carey will discuss her experimental work with Polaroid from the 1970s to the present. Her lecture will address a range of her images, including her earliest “selfies” to her breakthrough, abstract Pulls that use the large format Polaroid 20-by-24-inch camera and are included in the exhibition.

 

Party on the Porch

September 23, 6–10 p.m.
Music, food, and art festival

 

Also on View:

 

Between the Lines: Gego as Printmaker

Through August 6, 2017
From zigzags and curves to diagonals and scribbles, this small exhibition of prints by abstract artist Gego (1912–1994) celebrates the vibrant diversity of line. While primarily known as a kinetic sculptor, Gego explored the printing process’s potential for creating intricate linear patterns while working at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles in 1966.

Drawn from the Amon Carter’s collection, these richly saturated lithographs reflect Gego’s interest in the intersection between line and space. Her choice of dramatic blacks and reds, contrasted with the lightly colored paper sheet, highlights the images generated by negative space, or what Gego called, “the nothing between the lines.”

 

Avedon in Texas: Selections from In the American West
Through July 2, 2017

When renowned New York City fashion and portrait photographer Richard Avedon (1923–2004) agreed in late 1978 to take on a commission from the Amon Carter to create a portrait of the American West through its people, he was filled with uncertainty about whether the project would succeed. The following spring he went to the Rattlesnake Round-Up in Sweetwater, Texas. That weekend he created six evocative portraits that would set the tone and bar for five more years of photographing. In these sittings, he discovered people who conveyed through their faces, clothes and postures, not merely hard living but the full embrace of existence. This selection of 17 of the project’s Texas images makes abundantly clear why In the American West has become a touchstone in photographic history.

 

Homer and Remington in Black and White

Through July 2, 2017
Winslow Homer (1836–1910) and Frederic Remington (1861–1909) were among the most accomplished American artists of their day. While they both personally measured the success of their careers by the recognition they received from critics and patrons for their oil paintings, they likely would never have obtained the status of American greats without their mutual involvement in the world of illustration. Wide distribution in the leading periodicals of the day assured that they became household names. Both artists learned how to communicate clearly and concisely in black and white, distilling the essence of a scene into a few sharp elements. This exhibition features works from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection that represent the variety of their creations in black and white.

 

Fluid Expressions: The Prints of Helen Frankenthaler

March 18–September 10, 2017
Although widely known for her iconic “soak-stain” canvases, Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) was an equally inventive printmaker who took risks in a medium not frequently explored by abstract expressionists. Fluid Expressions: The Prints of Helen Frankenthaler highlights the artist’s often-overlooked, yet highly original and whimsical print production.

Drawn from the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, this exhibition includes more than 25 prints made from a diverse range of techniques, including lithographs, etchings, aquatints, screen prints and woodcuts.

 

Darryl Lauster: Trace
March 25, 2017–March 25, 2018
For his sculptural installation Trace, Texas-based artist Darryl Lauster (b. 1969) created 10 fragmentary Carrara marble tablets and carved phrases in them using a font reminiscent of monuments. The blocks of stone seemingly speak essential truths—such as language from American founding documents, various militia and splinter group manifestos, and parts of the inscription on the Statue of Liberty—uniting fundamental phrases intended for entirely different purposes and obscuring their original meanings. Because the stones appear to be broken pieces of a full inscription, any overarching meaning is difficult to discern, much as many of the texts in their entirety are subject to differing interpretations. Trace asks us to wonder whether what we are reading is from a separatist group, Darwin, or the Bill of Rights. His work engages with contemporary society while using historical language.

 

Nature/Culture

July 15–December 10, 2017
We often think of nature as that which stands beyond humanity and culture as that which reflects people’s achievements. But rarely is the matter so simple. This exhibition explores different facets of the dichotomy. Besides reflecting on how nature counterpoints and enlivens our built environment, the show recognizes the more problematic use of the term, and its cousin “natural,” when applied to snapshots, portraits and Native American cultures.

 

Dornith Doherty: Archiving Eden

August 12, 2017–January 14, 2018
Over the last nine years, North Texas photographer Dornith Doherty has traveled the globe to construct a visual meditation on the planet’s botanical diversity by showcasing the work of international seed banks and sharing the pure aesthetic pleasure of seeds and their transformations into plants. This exhibition celebrates the completion of that project. At a time when some ecologists are suggesting that we are losing more than 10 animal and plant species each day, the display provides eloquent confirmation of the close relationship between botany and biophilia.

 

Caught on Paper

September 23, 2017–February 11, 2018
From giving something your “best shot” to feeling like a “fish out of water,” metaphors and imagery from the sport of hunting and fishing permeate American culture. Inspired by the coinciding exhibition of painting and sculpture Wild Spaces Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art, this selection of works on paper explores the popular outdoor subjects that have captivated American artists for centuries.

Caught on Paper brings together more than 30 works on paper from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection. With watercolors and prints by artists such as Winslow Homer, Buffalo Meat, Frederic Remington, Charles M. Russell and Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, this show is truly a rare catch.

University of Dallas Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery Presents ‘View from the Art Village: 50-Year Retrospective’

Lucas Martell, 230–430, 2016, Dye, watercolor, and gouache, on rag paper, 30" x 22", Courtesy of the artist

Lucas Martell, 230–430, 2016, Dye, watercolor, and gouache, on rag paper, 30″ x 22″, Courtesy of the artist

Retrospective Celebrates 50 Years of Graduate Studies with Exhibition of Alumni Art

In celebration of 50 years of graduate studies at the University of Dallas, the Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery presents View from the Art Village: 50-Year Retrospective, an exhibition that features more than 40 alumni artists of the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts. Promising exciting work from stalwart artists such as Bob Nunn, Linnea Glatt, Roberto Munguia, and Ann Stautberg, among many more, this exhibition features some of North Texas’ most prominent artists, whose works have been featured in museums, galleries, churches and convents around the world.

The exhibition’s curator, Nancy Cohen Israel, will give remarks during the opening reception on Friday, March 24, from 6-9 p.m., and provide a curator-guided gallery tour on Sunday, April 2 from 1-3 p.m. The exhibit will remain open through Saturday, April 29.

Spanning half a century, View from the Art Village: 50-Year Retrospective provides visitors with a survey of contemporary artists who spent their formative years in the University of Dallas’ Haggerty Art Village. While selecting the exhibition’s featured artists, Israel found the caliber of University of Dallas artists revelatory because “so many have been especially vital to North Texas’ art scene.”

Early art graduates Jack Mims, George Green and Jim Roche, make up three-fourths of the famous “Oak Cliff Four,” who pioneered Texas Funk — an art movement that blended cultural Texas idioms with psychedelic and pop art — in the early ’70s. Sister Maria Liebeck, member of the religious community Daughters of Charity, has used art to connect prayer and faith, devoting her art ministry to serving the poor.

Juergen Strunck,CCK-7 2016, Ink on Japanese fiber, chine colle on cotton fiber, 25 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist, Photo Credit: Harrison Evans

Juergen Strunck,CCK-7 2016, Ink on Japanese fiber, chine colle on cotton fiber, 25 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist, Photo Credit: Harrison Evans

In Dallas alone, many University of Dallas art alumni have recently exhibited their works, including Roberto Munguia and his large retrospective, “Buscador/Descubridor,” displayed at the Latino Cultural Center; Lucas Martell, with a solo exhibition at Circuit 12; Rachel Muldez, with a solo exhibition at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center; and multimedia artist and writer Laray Polk, and her Trinity River Project collaboration presented by the Liliana Bloch Gallery. Other significant artists include Christine Bisetto, former Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery director, and Professor Emeritus Juergen Strunck, who headed the university’s printmaking program for decades.

Many of our graduates go on to teach at other universities and community colleges.

A Dallas-based art historian, art educator and writer, Israel is the owner of Art à la Carte, which brings together art enthusiasts for classes on art history, tours and special programs. For 15 years, she has coordinated local, regional and international tours with the popular series “Second Saturdays,” visiting artists’ studios, private collections and other unique art spaces. Her familiarity with the Dallas/Fort Worth art scene made her the perfect candidate to curate this 50-year retrospective exhibition.

“Beyond the boundless talent that has emerged from the University of Dallas graduate art program, the school is unique for its leadership in other ways. From being the first integrated school in Texas to offering the first graduate art program at a Catholic university in the region, this dynamic of always moving forward continues to create trailblazing artists who will, no doubt, continue to push the boundaries of contemporary art,” said Exhibition Curator Nancy Cohen Israel.

Artists on view are Carol Beesley, Christine Bisetto, Gabriel Brubacher, Kate Colin, Donald Copeland, Carol Cook, Annie Chrietzberg, Mark Epstein, Nancy Ferro, Linnea Glatt, Linda G. Gossett, Maurice Gray, George Green, Mirka Hokkanen, Mary Hood, Robyn Jorde, Sr. Maria Liebeck (DC), Lucas Martell, Rachel McClung, Jack Mims, David Morris, Rachel Muldez, Roberto Munguia, Andrew Myers, Trish Nickell, Bob Nunn, Michael Obranovich, Rick Parsons, John Pavlicek, Laray Polk, Nancy Rebal, Socorro Rico, Jim Roche, Humberto Saenz, Albert T. Scherbarth, Donna Stallard, Ann Stautberg, Jonathan Stewart, Juergen Strunck, Lance Timco, Terri Thornton, Jeffery Vaughn and Tony Veronese.

Linnea Glatt, Beige Pinstripe, Black/Beige Pinstripe, Black Pinstripe, 2016, Fabric and thread on paper, 30" x 22", Courtesy of the artist and Barry Whistler Gallery

Linnea Glatt, Beige Pinstripe, Black/Beige Pinstripe, Black Pinstripe, 2016, Fabric and thread on paper, 30″ x 22″, Courtesy of the artist and Barry Whistler Gallery

About the Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is located in the Art History Building at the corner of Gorman Drive and Haggar Circle on the University of Dallas campus at 1845 E. Northgate Drive in Irving. The gallery, which is part of the universitY’S  Haggerty Art Village, is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more gallery information, visit www.udallas.edu/galleryor call 972-721-5087.

About the University

The University of Dallas, located in a metropolitan area of nearly 7 million people, is a leading Catholic university widely recognized for academic excellence by well-known publications, organizations and accrediting bodies. It offers distinctive individual undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs in the liberal arts, business and ministry that are characterized by an exceptional, engaged faculty, a commitment to shaping principled, well-skilled leaders and academic rigor in the Catholic intellectual tradition. For more information, visit www.udallas.edu.

Islamic Art Revival Series Exhibition

Helen Zughaib, Generations Lost

Helen Zughaib, Generations Lost

IARS Women’s Invitational Exhibition 2017 was presented by Islamic Art Revival Series at the Eiseman Center of Performing Arts and Corporate Presentations in Richardson, Texas in the Forrest and Virginia Green Mezzanine Gallery from March 1st to March 26th.

This exhibition presented the work of ten minority women practicing in the United States as first generation artists. This exhibition focused on the work of these women artists who create art work which not only reflects, the strong bond to their own heritage but the experience of living in the USA, their new permanent home, and how this experience has influenced the work they are presenting now.

The exhibition Curator and IARS Art Director Shafaq Ahmad explains, the work selected is innovative, daring, inspiring and presents unique narratives, techniques, current social issues and viewpoints that contribute to understanding of diverse cultures.  A wide variety of themes will be presented in this contemporary art exhibition. Artists originally from Japan, Iran, Lebanon, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, now living in the United States were invited to take part in this unique and inspiring exhibition.

IARS offers an opportunity for the audiences of all ages, genders, faiths and cultures to view not only very diverse art but to interact with a body of work from each artist for a better understanding of their work.

The artists participating in the exhibition are Sarah Ahmad from Georgia, Nida Bangash, from Texas, Sue Ewing from Texas, Nina Gharbanzadeh from Wisconsin, Saberah Malik from Massachusettes, Hend Al Mansour from Minnesota, Roya Mansourkhani from Texas, Naoko Morisawa from Washington, Sudi Sharaf from New York and Helen Zughaib from Washington D.C.

 

Visit the Islamic Art Revival Series website.

COMCOL Annual Conference Call for Papers

COMCOL logo

The Guardians of Contemporary Collecting and Collections – working with (contested) collections and narratives

Umeå, Sweden, 5–9 December 2017

 

COMCOL is the International Committee for Collecting of the International Council of Museums (ICOM), which aims to deepen discussions and share knowledge on the practice, theory and ethics of collecting and collections development. This year COMCOL jointly organises its annual conference with DOSS (Contemporary Collecting Sweden, previous Samdok), Norsam (Nordic network for contemporary collecting and research at museums), and ICOM Sweden.

Ten years after the Connecting Collections conference in Stockholm, which was the starting point for COMCOL, we will return to Sweden. From 5–9 December we will be hosted at the Västerbottens museum in Umeå.

During the conference we would like to connect to the legacy of Samdok, focusing on collecting the present; connecting the present with historical collections and collections with communities. We would like to look closer at good practices in museums concerning collecting and collections, practices that are possible to develop further. We would also like to investigate the difficult narratives. As our diverse societies today put different demands on our collections, collecting strategies and presentations, it has become impossible to speak about cultural heritage without asking the questions: Which heritage? Whose? So how can (contested) collections be revisited? How can we create democratic collections? Which new approaches to museum ethics can be used, and how can contemporary practices and collecting address or add to the discussion around difficult heritage?

 

We invite papers from researchers, museum professionals and students that address the collection development, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • The triangular relationship between museum, community and collection
  • What are the contested histories and objects of the past for societies today? How can we address issues around contested objects or narratives in the museum? For whom are they disturbing? Which roles can the communities play in the representation? And how do museums register and preserve the contested histories in a contemporary context to make the future colleagues understand its context and reason to be collected? Theory, practice and ethics.
  • The democratic collections: collecting and safeguarding of histories and objects from an inclusive perspective
  • As guardians of collecting, collections and collective memories, museums have a role and responsibility to collect from an inclusive perspective, focusing not only on the majority society, but also on minorities from a wide perspective. Age, educational level, ethnical background, gender, gender identity, disabilities, religion, sexual orientation and social class are examples that form us as human beings. In what way do museums collect and preserve histories and objects from minorities and our diverse society? How do museums work in an inclusive way with contemporary collecting and collections? And how is the diversity visible in the collections and in museums´ digital catalogues? Theory, practice and ethics.
  • Letting go, identification and shared authority
  • The discussions about contested objects also incapsulate postcolonial issues of representation and repatriation, discussing museological issues concerning interpretation, categorization and multivocality. How can and do museums act when questions about repatriation arise? Which role can source communities play here? Theory, practice and ethics.
  • Collecting and participative strategies
  • How can collaborations between museums and communities create bridges to engage with (difficult) collections and create greater understanding and empathy? Can collaborations alter the context of the museums older collections? Can collaborations lead to new ways of collecting and interpreting old collections? Can collaborations lead to repatriation or de-accessioning of collections? Theory, practice and ethics.
  • Sustainability of contemporary collections
  • Who are the guardians of collecting, collections and collective memories of the museums? Is it one person, a group or a society? How do politics, economy and the spirit of the time influence collecting practices? In what way did the Samdok way of collecting influence its collecting at the time, and how does it function today? Samdok has also inspired the birth of COMCOL, what other collecting practices or collaborations between museums on contemporary collecting in the world can be seen as good practices to develop further and to inspire collaborations on collecting and collections?

 

Submitting abstracts:

Abstracts (between 250 and 300 words) should be sent to: comcolumea2017@vbm.se by June 1st 2017.

Approval of proposals will be announced by July 10th 2017.

 

The following information should be included with the abstract:

  • Title of submitted proposal, please indicate if it is a paper, workshop or panel contribution
  • Name(s) of Authors
  • Affiliation(s), e-mailaddress(es), and full address(es)
  • Technical requirements for the presentations

 

The conference and abstract language is English.

We warmly welcome proposals that go beyond traditional paper presentations and encompass also panels, pot-it sessions and workshop formats.

 

Conference publication:

A conference publication is planned. Please inform if you are not willing to be a part of the publication!

A full paper for the publication should be sent to: comcolumea2017@vbm.se by September 1st 2017.

Report of the Director

Richard Brettell - AH - Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies - Art History

Richard Brettell – Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies – Art History

The specialist history of Chinese Art in America is now more than a century old, and we have important collections of Chinese Art and concomitant art historians who specialize in Chinese art in virtually every American city. Yet, with Maoist China, both commerce in Chinese art and active scholarly interchange was in hiatus. Now, with the openness of China and with the competitive edge in the world economy swinging in its direction, any serious art history institute must reckon with China.

Fortunately, we at UTD have one of the first Confucius Institutes in the US, and its Director, Dr. Ming Dong Gu, is a native of the great imperial and university city of Nanjing (which we used to call Nanking). Through Dr. Gu’s efforts, we at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History were invited by the Institute of Art to the University of Nanjing.

Our idea was simple, to introduce for the first time in a major Chinese university (whose origins go back to the third century of the common era!) an Institute of the Study of American Art in China (ISAAC). Our partner in this endeavor is the Amon Carter Museum, whose collection of American Art and whose unparalleled library and archive of American Art history is one of the great resources of North Texas. Dr. Andrew Walker and I went to China under Dr. Gu’s expert guidance and spent several days in Nanjing.

It was, for both of us, our first trip to China and was in every way life-changing. We landed in Shanghai, took the fast train to Nanjing, and were immediately immersed in the graduate school campus of the University of Nanjing. Our tour of the beautiful old campus included the Pearl Buck House, where the first American Woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature lived in the 1920’s and early 1930’s when Nanjing was the capital of Republic China. This block-like, grey brick house now stands empty in the center of the campus and is, for Americans, an architectural talisman of a time when Americans played a vital role in the international understanding of China.

In our conversations with Dr. Zhou Xian, the distinguished Director of the Art Institute of Nanjing University, the graduate students in its distinguished program of aesthetics and art history, and the undergraduates at the new suburban undergraduate campus of the University of Nanjing, both Andrew and I were impressed by the rare combination of knowledge and curiosity that is essential to the most important scholarship.

We began to conceive together an Institute for the Study of American Art in China that has four components: 1. Systematically training Chinese Art historians to teach and research the history of American Art, 2. Publishing an evolving series of important titles in American Art History in Chinese, 3. Bringing distinguished American art historians to Nanjing for a series of Summer Courses in American Art History, and 3. Imagining with colleagues at Chinese museums a program of exhibitions of American Art in China.

Before we left and in more intensive conversations after our return, we discussed these efforts with Chicago’s Terra Foundation for American Art, who will become the fifth partner in an initial three-year joint funding of this institute with the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History and the Confucius Institute at UTD, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, and the University of Nanjing.

This program of cooperation among a Chinese and an American university, an American museum, and an American foundation committed to promoting knowledge of American Art history outside our borders, can—and will—have a profound effect both on China and on the US. American Art historians have contributed so much in the past century to the art historical knowledge of European, Latin American, African, and Asian institutions. With ISAAC (our felicitous acronym), we will create a fertile context for US in the United Sates to learn about ourselves from Chinese scholars.

With wonderful direct flights from DFW airport to China, the work already accomplished by our Dean, Dr. Dennis Kratz, and the director of our Confucius Institute, will take on a new dimension and add the University of Nanjing to the highly “curated” international alliances of the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History. We will have active programs in Nanjing and Naples, in Munich and Zurich, and, perhaps, in France. Edith O’Donnell has allowed us at UTD to spread our wings, and we have flown far and wide.

Greetings from the Assistant Director

To launch the new year, on Saturday, January 13 the O’Donnell Institute partnered for the first time with the Crow Collection of Asian Art to present a symposium on the global histories of ceramics. Called Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas, the symposium brought together an all-star team of distinguished scholars to study and respond to the Crow’s stunning new exhibition Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles. The exhibition’s curator Farzaneh Pirouz was joined by Denise Leidy (Curator of Asian Art at Yale University Art Gallery), Guy Thomson (Professor Emeritus of Latin American History at University of Warwick), Jessica Hallet (Researcher in Art History at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Ronda Kasl (Curator of Latin American Art at the Metropolitan Museum), and William Sargent (Curator Emeritus of Asian Export Art at the Peabody Essex Museum) for three morning lectures held at the Dallas Museum of Art and an afternoon of gallery-based break-out sections at the Crow. Like the exhibition itself, presentations and conversations were truly global in scope, ranging from sixth-century China to ninth-century Basra to sixteenth-century Mexico to circa-1900 New York. Our own Sabiha Al Khemir presided over the morning session, and Rick Brettell and Crow curator Jacqueline Chao moderated a closing panel in the afternoon.

 

Participants in the Crow's international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections:  East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

Participants in the Crow’s international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

 

By all accounts the symposium was a great success, and it’s precisely the kind of program that we are passionate about presenting: collaborative, object-led conversations with broad art historical implications. At the same time that speakers treated specific art historical questions like the origins of the use of cobalt blue in ceramics, the day raised larger questions with broad art historical significance: How is a complex technology transferred across space, time, and culture? How do objects made in one medium like clay dialogue with other mediums like glass and silver? How do local industries like that of Talavera in Puebla intersect with histories of class, race, and national politics? And how do our art histories of porcelain, for example, shape our practices of collecting—and vice versa? These and other questions that emerged from conversations and close looking will chart the course for future research.

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

 

If you were among the many friends and colleagues who joined us on Saturday, thank you for coming! If you were not able to attend, there is still time to see the exhibition before it closes in Dallas on February 12 and travels to Puebla, Mexico. It’s not to be missed!

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski

Assistant Director

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Become a Friend

More than three years ago, the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History was founded with a $17 million gift from Mrs. O’Donnell, one of the largest single donations in the history of UT Dallas. With her largesse and under the leadership and vision of Dr. Richard Brettell, an exciting future is ahead for the Institute.

To expand the Institute’s work, a new Master’s in Art History will be launched in Fall 2018. This new initiative for the University will prepare a select and highly qualified group of students for careers in art research, education, museums and conservation. With the Institute’s headquarters in the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building at UT Dallas and the Dallas Museum of Art, future scholars will be inspired and motivated to learn about art in museum settings, taking advantage of an abundance of resources in our regional collections.

Other initiatives include an innovative international research partnership with the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples led by Dr. Sarah Kozlowski, Assistant Director, and a major art conservation initiative led by Dr. David McPhail, Distinguished Chair of Conservation Science. Both are the genesis of new collaborations with museums throughout the world.

We thank the following donors for their support of the O’Donnell Institute.  We invite you to join us as a “Friend” and be a part of Dr. Brettell’s vision to make EODIAH one of the world’s great art institutes and one of the greatest assets to UT Dallas and the cultural life of Texas.

 

FOUNDING DONOR
Edith O’Donnell

MAJOR DONORS
The State of Texas
Mrs. Eugene McDermott
The Hamon Charitable Foundation

O’DONNELL CIRCLE
The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation

DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE
Salle Stemmons

PATRON
Mr. Harlan Crow
Communities Foundation of Texas
Carolyn and Bob Dickson
Mr. and Mrs. John Ridings Lee
Legett Foundation

SCHOLAR
Ms. Ruth Mutch
George A. and and Nancy P. Shutt Foundation

PARTNER
The Dallas Foundation – Mr. and Mrs. William T. Solomon, Sr.
Mrs. Nancy M. Dedman
Ms. Patricia Patterson

SPECIAL RECOGNITION
Winifred and Ivan Phillips
Mr. Peter Rathbone and the Estate of Perry Rathbone
Eve Reid
Roger S. Horchow
Mrs. I.D. “Nash”  Flores III

You may make a gift at www.utdallas.edu/arthistory.

Please call me at (972) 883-2472 or email me at lucy.buchanan@utdallas.edu. I look forward to discussing the many significant ways you can help support the Institute and become a part of our exciting future.

Sincerely,

Lucy M. Buchanan
Director of Development
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Art of Examination Spring 2017 Course at UT Southwestern Medical School

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course will improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction. We discuss factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice. Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice. The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

The Art of Examination is taught at Dallas art institutions such as The Dallas Museum of Art, pictured.  Images courtesy of ArtDocs.

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, continues to make advances in the field of Art and Medicine.  This Spring 2017 semester she will continue to teach The Art of Examination course through UT Southwestern Medical School with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education, Dallas Museum of Art; and Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator.

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction.

Art of Examination Course 2017 II

At The Dallas Museum of Art

The class discusses factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice.  Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice.

The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at The Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

At The Dallas Museum of Art

At The Dallas Museum of Art

Report from the EODIAH Research Center

Thank you to everyone who joined us last fall at our workshops and events.  Our speakers presented thought-provoking research and the resulting discourses were lively and insightful.  We are excited to offer a full slate of programs for the coming spring semester, and welcome guest speakers from other cultural institutions.  Our two-day February symposium, Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques, brings together art historians, curators, and conservators to explore artists’ writings about materials and techniques.  Robyn Hodgkins, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Trinity University in San Antonio, will visit us to discuss modern and contemporary oil paint formulations.  In particular, Hodgkins will look at two van Gogh paintings from the National Gallery of Art and then a closer look at a new category of oil paint, water mixable oils (WMOs).  DMA Director of Exhibition and Museum Design Jessica Harden will provide a ‘behind-the-scenes’ look at how exhibition design impacts the artwork and visitor experience.

 Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University


Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University

In March, fellows have the unique opportunity to tour the eclectic art collection of local collector James A. Ledbetter which includes African, Asian and Modern European works. DFW area university faculty from SMU and UT Dallas will present their contributions to local scholarship including Dr. Michael Corris who will showcase his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art.  A variety of topics will be presented by our UT Dallas fellows including Leslie Reid, who will give a gallery talk at the DMA on Modernist architecture of universal art museums focusing on architect Edward Larrabee Barnes’ design.

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

 

We have an exciting spring ahead and hope that all of you can join us!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

 

 

EODIAH Upcoming Programs

Workshop Talk
Dr. Adam Herring, Chair of Art History, Southern Methodist University

Turntable: Inca Cuzco’s ‘Terrace of Leisure’
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Gallery Talk
Jessica Harden, Director of Exhibition and Museum Design, The Dallas Museum of Art

Exhibition and Museum Design at The Dallas Museum of Art
At The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Workshop Talk
Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University

A closer look at modern and contemporary oil paint formulations
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Workshop Talk
Poe Johnson, UT Dallas Fellow

The Great Chain of Being Black: Images of the Lynched Black Body as Participatory Fandom
At UT Dallas, ATEC 2.705
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

O’Donnell Institute Symposium

Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques
Open to the public
Please RSVP

 

Workshop Talk
Dr. Allan Antliff, UT Dallas Research Fellow

Pedagogical Subversion: The ‘Un-American’ Graphics of Kevin C. Pyle
At The O’Donnell Institute Research Center in The Dallas Museum of Art
Open to O’Donnell Institute/UT Dallas/DMA affiliates and other Dallas-Fort Worth art historians

 

Please visit our website for all of our upcoming programs.

Mark Rosen, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

In November 2016, Mark Rosen presented new research on Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s (now lost) fourteenth-century mappamundi at the Andrew Ladis Trecento Conference held at Tulane University in New Orleans. His most recent publication is “Jachia ben Mehmet and the Medici Court,” in an volume entitled The Grand Ducal Medici and Their Archive (1537–1743) edited by Alessio Assonitis and Brian Sandberg (Turnhout: Brepols, 2016). In the spring 2017 semester, Dr. Rosen is teaching a graduate course on the social history of art and will be presenting at the Renaissance Society of America Conference in Chicago.

Allan Antliff, EODIAH Visiting Research Scholar

 

Allan Antliff, Associate Professor, Art History and Visual Studies, University of Victoria

Allan Antliff, Associate Professor, Art History and Visual Studies, University of Victoria

“Glamourized,” a critical appraisal of post-modernist trends in contemporary art by EODIAH Visiting Scholar Allan Antliff, has just appeared in New Perspectives for Contemporary Music in the 21st Century, Daniel Biro and Kai Johannes Polzhofer, eds. (Hofheim, Germany: Wolke Verlag, 2016).

While in residence at the Institute Allan Antliff will be completing his latest book, Aesthetics of Tension: Anarchist Currents in Contemporary ArtAesthetics of Tension explores anarchist art production across an array of mediums, including digital art, video and film, painting, sculpture, installations, performance, audio works, ‘zines’, graphics, and architecture. This art, Antliff argues, thrives on qualities of contestation at the same time as it seeks to intensify ruptures that are generative, unleashing imaginative freedoms that find their grounding in the artwork’s relational power and communicative efficacy. Addressing issues such as racism, biotechnology, surveillance, war, the economics of art, collective art making, and gentrification, Aesthetics of Tension will foreground a body of work steeped in challenges to the status quo.

Joseph R. Hartman, EODIAH Research Fellow

Joseph Hartman

Joseph Hartman

EODIAH Research Fellow Joseph R. Hartman received his PhD in Art History from Southern Methodist University December 17, 2016. After graduation, Hartman traveled to Cuba to meet with professionals and to document monuments in Havana, Santa Clara, and Trinidad for his current book manuscript The Dictator’s Dreamscape: Building Machado’s Cuba. The book examines the public works program of U.S.-backed Dictator Gerardo Machado (in power 1925-1933). It reconsiders Cuban art, architecture, and visual culture within broader histories of nation building, globalization, and the rise of U.S. hegemony in the Western hemisphere during the twentieth century. With generous financial and scholarly support from the Edith O’Donnell Institute, Hartman will complete the book manuscript in the coming spring.

Paul Galvez, EODIAH Research Fellow Curates Exhibition at galerie frank elbaz

Julije Knifer, 21-25 XI 10-16X 21-25X 10-15XI. 4-7 XII 10-13.XII.81, 1981, Graphite on paper, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. / 50 x 65 cm

Julije Knifer, 21-25 XI 10-16X 21-25X 10-15XI. 4-7 XII 10-13.XII.81, 1981, Graphite on paper, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. / 50 x 65 cm

Martin Barré, Sheila Hicks, Julije Knifer, Mangelos, Bernard Piffaretti

Meandering, Abstractly

curated by Paul Galvez at galerie frank elbaz, Dallas

January 14 – March 25, 2017

 

For decades after MoMA’s 1936 exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art Alfred Barr’s iconic diagram was the image of modern art’s history: a series of –isms hung on a genealogical tree, from post-Impressionism to Surrealism. In 2013, the same institution envisaged a 21st century update, more interlacing network than hereditary branches. Meandering, Abstractly re-visits postwar European abstraction via less well-known routes:  Zagreb and Peru, instead of New York and Düsseldorf.

The show’s basic question is this:  how did artists like Julije Knifer, Mangelos, Martin Barré, Bernard Piffaretti, and Sheila Hicks come to re-interpret the legacies of Malevitch, Mondrian, Max Bill, and Josef Albers in such unexpected and highly original ways, leading them to produce works whose extraordinary inventiveness is due in no small part to the unique historical and geographic circumstances of their creation.

Paul Galvez holds a PhD from Columbia University. He is a Research Fellow at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, where he works on modern art from the nineteenth century to the present.  His writing has appeared in journals such as ArtforumCahiers d’art moderne, and October as well as in several monographs: Courbet: A Dream of Modern Art (Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, 2011); Martin Barré: the decisive years (Éditions Dilecta, Paris, 2013), an exhibition catalogue published the same year as a 2-person show he curated on the work of Barré and R.H. Quaytman at Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris; Brice Marden: Graphite Drawings (Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 2014); David Balula: Ember Harbor (Shelter Press, 2014); Bernard Piffaretti, 1980-2016 – Catalogue Raisonnable (MAMCO, Geneva, 2016); and Bernard Piffaretti, Works: 1986-2015(Karma, New York, 2016).

 

Read more at the gallery’s website.

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

José Clemente Orozco The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926 Oil on canvas Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm) Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

José Clemente Orozco
The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926
Oil on canvas
Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm)
Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

 

México 1900–1950 Highlights New Narratives in Mexico’s Modern Art History

It’s a happy new year. This month the DMA issued its press release publicly announcing the exciting addition of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde to the Museum’s exhibition schedule. The exhibition, curated by Dr. Agustín Arteaga, opened at the Grand Palais in Paris this past October, where it has received great public and critical acclaim. México 1900–1950 offers a renewed vision of Mexican art from the first half of the 20th century through a faithful account of the ambitious spirit of this major period of national artistic history. The impact of cultural activity in Mexico from the end of the long civil war (the Mexican revolt of 1910–20) until the beginning of the 1950s was indeed a singular phenomenon and can be seen in the works presented in México 1900–1950.
The exhibition, with the DMA serving as the only North American venue and the only venue outside of Paris, has already received tremendous support from the DMA community in the brief weeks since its inclusion in the DMA lineup of exhibitions this spring, and the DMA looks forward to inviting our community to discover more of the fabric of Mexico’s art history beginning March 12.

 

 

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Dr. Chu Comes to Dallas

On November 29, NEA Chairman Jane Chu visited Dallas as the featured speaker for the Dallas Arts District Community Breakfast. Afterwards, she visited the DMA with Gary Gibbs, Executive Director of the Texas Commission on the Arts, for a tour led by Agustín Arteaga of the Conservation Studio and the African and Contemporary Art galleries, with senior curators Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and Gavin Delahunty, The Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, offering commentary. Her visit ended with a presentation by Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education and Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences, and Ingrid Van Haastrecht, Director of Development Operations and Analysis, on the progress of the NEA grant the DMA received to conduct an evaluation of the South Dallas community and how they engage with the Museum. Dr. Chu’s visit was chronicled the following day in this article in the Dallas Morning News.

 

 

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

After four and a half groundbreaking years at the DMA, Mark Leonard, the Museum’s first Chief Conservator, will be retiring—for the second time—to the sun-drenched California desert. Leonard stepped down in 2010 as the Head of the Paintings Conservation Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum to pursue his career as an artist. His DMA appointment in 2012 signaled the initial phase of the development of the Museum’s conservation program, which included the addition of staff and the renovation of its on-site spaces to include a paintings conservation studio.

While at the DMA, Leonard carefully stewarded the collection and built a robust and comprehensive conservation program. He was responsible for carrying out major treatments on over 60 works of art, restoring a range of works, from a rare early Renaissance Spanish panel painting, to Jacques Blanchard’s 17th-century oil painting Zeus and Semele, to a work by Texas artist Julian Onderdonk that had been confined to storage for decades because of its poor state of preservation. Leonard also collaborated with private collectors on the study and care of their collections in order to present the work in the Museum galleries for all to see.

Under Leonard’s direction, the DMA also established a network of regional conservation partnerships with museums in North Texas and local universities to collaborate on conservation research and the study of individual works. Although he will surely be missed, the impact of his time at the DMA will not soon be forgotten—and evidence of it will continue to be seen throughout our institution.

 

On View at The Dallas Museum of Art

DMA_Logo_Print_CMYK_2Color

On view at the DMA this Winter/Spring:

 

Nicolas Party: Pathway

Through February 5, 2017

Concourse

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

México 1900 – 1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

March 12-July 16, 2017

DMA Co-organized; U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Art and Nature in the Middle Ages

Through March 19, 2017

Chilton II

U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion
May 21–August 20, 2017

Chilton II

 

Visions of America: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art
May 28–September 4, 2017

Chilton II

 

Waxed: Batik from Java

Through September 10, 2017

Level 3

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail

Through November 12, 2017

Focus II

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

SMU Comini Lecture Series

SMU Comini Lecture Series:

Nina Dubin, Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago

Love, Trust, Risk: Painting the “Papered Century”

Monday January 30, O’Donnell Lecture Hall, Meadows School of the Arts, SMU, 5 pm

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, “The Love Letter,” c. 1770

Jean-Honoré Fragonard, “The Love Letter,” c. 1770

The Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, Lectures

Exhibitions

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

The Festival Book for San Fernando: Celebrating Sainthood in Baroque Seville

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

Mar. 12-Jun. 11, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Events

Artist Demonstration: Drawing Tools

Mar. 10, 6:00 pm

Sandy Rodriguez

Meadows Museum

 

Lectures

Lecture: Rafael Barradas and the Development of the Spanish Avant-Garde

Jan. 19, 6:00 pm

Jed Morse

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture Series: Reflecting on Ribera: Art and Culture in Spain and Spanish Naples, 1600-1700

February 3, 10:30 am

February 10, 10:30 am

February 24, 10:30 am

March 3, 10:30 am

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, SMU

Meadows Museum

The four lectures in this series examine the world and work of the Spanish-born artist Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652), who is the subject of the upcoming Meadows Museum exhibition Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera. By carefully analyzing specific artworks by Ribera and his contemporaries, the lectures situate Ribera within the broader context of the global Iberian empire, in which his chosen hometown of Naples played an integral role. Some of the themes examined include Ribera’s confrontation with the legacy of Caravaggio and Domenichino, his penchant for violent scenes of martyrdom and suffering, the appeal of his stark realism, and his creation of images that were both effective religious objects and cutting-edge contemporary artworks. Coffee and pastries are served in the Founders Room before each lecture, from 10 to 10:25 a.m. This program is made possible by gifts from The Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation and The Eugene McDermott Foundation.

Read more on this lecture.

 

Lecture: Retired Art History Professor Turns to Crime (Writing)

Feb. 23, 6:00 pm

Alessandra Comini

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Velázquez, Curator to the King

Mar. 2, 6:00 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Juan Carreño’s Charles II and the Spanish Hall of Mirrors

Mar. 3, 12:15 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Sublime and Grotesque: Ribera and the Art of Drawing

Mar. 10, 10:30 am

Edward Payne

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Drawings are Paintings

Mar. 31, 12:15 pm

Mary Vernon

Meadows Museum

UNT Art Historian Kelly Donahue-Wallace Scholar Report

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor, Department of Art History, University of North Texas

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor, Department of Art History, University of North Texas

Dr. Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Professor of Art History at the University of North Texas celebrates the publication of her book Jerónimo Antonio Gil and the Idea of the Spanish Enlightenment. Examining the career of a largely unstudied eighteenth-century engraver, this book establishes Jerónimo Antonio Gil, a man immersed within the complicated culture and politics of the Spanish empire, as a major figure in the history of both Spanish and Mexican art. Donahue-Wallace examines Gil as an artist, tracing his education, entry into professional life, appointment to the Mexico City mint, and foundation of the Royal Academy of the Three Noble Arts of San Carlos. She analyzes the archival and visual materials he left behind and, most importantly, she considers the ideas, philosophies, and principles of his era, those who espoused them, and how Gil responded to them. Although frustrated by resistance from the faculty and colleagues he brought to his academy, Gil would leave a lasting influence on the Mexican art scene as local artists continued to benefit from his legacy at the Mexican academy.  The book is published by University of New Mexico Press, 2017.

The Gallery at UTA Presents Adriana Corral and Leigh Merrill

Leigh Merrill, Pink Corner 2016, pigment print, 21 x 23 inches framed, image courtesy of Liliana Bloch Gallery

Leigh Merrill, Pink Corner 2016, pigment print, 21 x 23 inches framed, image courtesy of Liliana Bloch Gallery

Adriana Corral and Leigh Merrill

 January 17 – February 18, 2017

Reception Friday, January 20, 5:30 to 8 pm

 

The Gallery at UTA is pleased to present two concurrent exhibitions showcasing artists Adriana Corral (San Antonio) and Leigh Merrill (Dallas). Corral’s minimalist site—specific installations present troubling issues affecting society: human rights violations, injustice, victimized individuals and lack of reform are themes she often addresses in her work. Growing up in El Paso, Texas heightened her awareness of the nearby ‘atrocities in Juarez’ that ‘echo human tragedies around the world’ and inspired her to research and address complex socio—political crises in her art. Merrill’s photographic and video pieces examine the urban landscape through otherworldly vignettes made by digitally combining real—world images to create imaginary spaces. She touches upon themes of desire, fiction and beauty in her work as she illuminates the way our environments reference other places and times to reveal “a culture of perpetual longing.” Together, Corral and Merrill create a thought—provoking exhibition that utilizes artistic language to respond to complex conceptual issues.

 

Read more at The Gallery at UTA’s website.

Crow Collection of Asian Art Upcoming Exhibition and Events

Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney Perspectives 1 2015 Photography and ink on xuan paper 24 3/4 x 58 in Private Collection Image is courtesy of the artists

Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney
Perspectives 1
2015
Photography and ink on xuan paper
24 3/4 x 58 in
Private Collection
Image is courtesy of the artists

 

CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART PREMIERES LANDSCAPE RELATIVITIES: THE COLLABORATIVE WORKS OF ARNOLD CHANG AND MICHAEL CHERNEY FEB. 25-JUNE 25, 2017

Organized by the Crow Collection in Dallas, this exhibition blurs the lines between photography and the art of Chinese ink painting

The collaborative works of a renowned painter and an acclaimed photographer are the focus of Landscape Relativities: The Collaborative Works of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney. The Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas will premiere the exhibition Feb. 25 – June 25, 2017 in its Gallery One exhibition space in the Dallas Arts District.

In this exhibition, painter Arnold Chang (Zhang Hong; b. 1954) and photographer Michael Cherney (Qiu Mai; b. 1969) stretch and play with the relationship between the two media of painting and photography and the history and principles of Chinese ink painting. The exhibition – organized by the Crow Collection of Asian Art and curated by Dr. Jacqueline Chao, the Crow Collection’s Curator of Asian Art – will feature a selection of both their individual works along with new collaborative pieces to be exhibited publicly for the first time.

Read more at the Crow Collection of Asian Art website.

 

Other activities celebrate the exhibition

 

During the exhibition at the Crow Collection of Asian Art, a slate of supporting experiences will be presented for both the public and Friends of the Crow Collection, including:

 

Members’ Reception

March 2, 2017 6p.m. – 8p.m.

Exclusively for Friends of the Crow Collection, this cocktail and hors d’ouerves reception features an artist’s talk, tour and and mingling with artists Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang, other supporters, the museum’s curatorial team. Membership starts at just $65; to join visit crowcollection.org.

Artist 2 Artist Conversation

March 3, 2017 6p.m. – 11p.m.

This conversation experience was created to allow local artists and enthusiasts to interact directly with artists Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang to explore ideas around collaboration. Free and open to the public, seating limited and reservations required. Cash bar. Visit crowcollection.org for more information.

 

Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family SOLUNA International Music and Arts Festival Collaboration

May 16-June 4, 2017

Grammy® Award-winning composer and pianist Henri Scars Struck will create a meditative soundscape, confronting tradition and contemporary art practice, and Eastern and Western sensibilities in connection with the exhibition. This project is co-commissioned by the Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family SOLUNA International Music and Arts Festival. For more information visit https://www.mydso.com/SOLUNA.

TCU’s Annual Nancy Quarles Stuck Art History Lecture

TCU logo

1st Annual Nancy Quarles Stuck Art History Lecture

Professor Melissa Hyde, University of Florida

“What Ladies Do When They Paint for Their Own Amusement?” The Highs and Lows of Pastel Painting in Eighteenth-Century France

Monday, February 6, 6 pm

TCU Moudy North, Room 132

UNT Art Education and Art History Spring 2017 Lectures

Department of Art Education and Art History Lecture Series, University of North Texas, Spring 2017

 

February 2

Conversations: Art, Politics and North Texas

Sara-Jayne Parsons, TCU Art Galleries

Giovanni Valderas, Kirk Hopper Fine Art

6-7:30pm, Art 101

 

February 6

Jack Davis Endowed Lecture in Art Education

Kevin Tavin, Aalto University, Finland

6-7:30pm, Art 223

 

March 2

Conversations: Art, Politics and North Texas

Darryl Ratcliff, Ash Studios and Michelada Think Tank

6-7:30pm, Art 101

 

March 9

Jobs in the Visual Arts and Design: Panels and Workshops

3:30-8:30pm, Art 101 and Art 223

 

March 23

The ‘Desire of Deeds’: Sensual Documents and the Affective Performance of the Medieval Archive

Carol Symes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

5pm, Art 223

 

March 24

AVISTA North Texas Medieval Graduate Student Symposium

8am-5pm, Art 101

 

April 6

Sumerian Art in the Modernist Avant-Garde

Zinab Bahrani, Columbia University

5pm, Art 223

 

April 10

Art History Writing Competition Finalists

5pm, Art 223

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Exhibitions

LOUIS KAHN: THE POWER OF ARCHITECTURE

March 26, 2017 to June 25, 2017

Louis Kahn Building

The American architect Louis Kahn (1901–1974) is regarded as one of the great master builders of the 20th century. With complex spatial compositions and a choreographic mastery of light, Kahn created buildings of archaic beauty and powerful universal symbolism. Among his most important works are the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959–65), the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh (1962–83) and the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas (1966–72). The exhibition Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, organized by the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), is the first major retrospective of Kahn’s work in two decades.

The exhibition encompasses an unprecedented and diverse range of architectural models, original drawings, photographs and films. All of Kahn’s important projects are extensively documented—-from his early urban planning concepts and single-family houses to monumental late works such as the Roosevelt Memorial in New York City (1973/74), posthumously completed in October 2012. The view of Kahn’s architectural oeuvre is augmented by a selection of watercolors, pastels and charcoal drawings created during his travels, which document his skill as an artist and illustrator. Highlights of the exhibition include a 12-foot-high model of the spectacular City Tower designed for Philadelphia (1952–57), as well as previously unpublished film footage shot by Nathanial Kahn, the son of Louis Kahn and director of the film My Architect. Interviews with architects such as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Peter Zumthor and Sou Fujimoto underscore the current significance of Kahn’s work, which is being rediscovered and made accessible to a wide public audience with this exhibition.

This exhibition is organized by the Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. The exhibition is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional support is provided by The Beck Group.

Read more about the Kimbell’s exhibitions on their website.

Lectures

 

FEBRUARY 8, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

The Kimbell on the Road: Velázquez to Vigée le Brun

Nancy E. Edwards, Curator of European Art/Head of Academic Services, Kimbell Art Museum

 

FEBRUARY 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

Rembrandt, the Jews and “That Portrait” at the Kimbell

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

 

FEBRUARY 11, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Erik Skjolsvik, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 1, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

El Greco’s Portrait of Francisco de Pisa and the Instability of Portraiture in Renaissance Spain

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, Southern Methodist University,

Dallas

 

March 4, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Letitia Huckaby, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

As Much Taste and More Beauty: The Irish Country House Revealed

Robert O’Byrne, Fine and Decorative Arts Writer, Navan, County Meath, Ireland

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017

Symposium

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

SunRa 2016 Stanley Whitney SunRa 2016, 2016 Oil on linen 96 x 96 inches Courtesy of team gallery

SunRa 2016
Stanley Whitney
SunRa 2016, 2016
Oil on linen
96 x 96 inches
Courtesy of team gallery

 

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents FOCUS: Stanley Whitney

January 21-April 2, 2017

The FOCUS series is organized by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth for the Director’s Council, a group that supports acquisitions at the Museum. The series features three solo exhibitions annually, organized by Assistant Curator Alison Hearst.

Since the mid-1970s, Stanley Whitney has investigated the intricate possibilities of color and form in the realm of abstract painting. Whitney’s signature style features multicolored, irregular grids on square canvases. Taking the essentialist grid of minimalism as his cue, his configurations are loose, uneven geometric lattices comprised of vibrant stacked color blocks that vary in hue, shape, and the handling of the paint. Whitney also utilizes color as subject, and his paintings often refer to literature, music, places, and other artists, connections that are bolstered in his titles.

Working without preparatory materials, Whitney combines balance and intuition in his approach to painting, as each color block is painted sequentially in relation to the ongoing arrangement. This process is expressive, improvisational, and can be linked to jazz, which continually inspires the artist. As Whitney has stated, “The way that it’s a little offbeat, polyrhythmic; the way that things move. Nothing’s straight. Nothing’s regular. Everything’s a little crooked. And I think that’s really what comes out of the music. It comes out of the beat, it comes out of how people walk, the way people wear their hat, just a little off. I think about all of those kinds of things and want them in the painting.”

FOCUS: Stanley Whitney features new work by the artist, including three large-scale paintings.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

 

Firemen March 6 1985 Donald Sultan Firemen March 6 1985, 1985 Latex and tar on tile over Masonite 96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Firemen March 6 1985
Donald Sultan
Firemen March 6 1985, 1985
Latex and tar on tile over Masonite
96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings

February 19–April 23, 2017

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the first exhibition focusing on Donald Sultan’s seminal Disaster Paintings series, including eleven signature paintings from 1984 to 1990. Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings is organized by the Modern’s assistant curator, Alison Hearst. The exhibition will be on view at the Lowe Art Museum, Miami, September 29–December 23, 2016; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, February 19–April 23, 2017; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, May 26–September 4, 2017; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, September 23–December 31, 2017; and Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, January 24–May 13, 2018.

Artist Donald Sultan’s career began with his first solo exhibition in 1977 in New York City, when he was just 26 years old, and he rose to prominence in the 1980s. A painter, sculptor, and printmaker, Sultan is regarded for his ongoing large-scale painted still lifes featuring structural renderings of fruit, flowers, and other everyday objects, often abstracted and set against a rich, black background; but he is also noted for his significant industrial landscape series that began in the early 1980s entitled the Disaster Paintings, on which the artist worked for nearly a decade. While Sultan’s still lifes depict and strengthen fragile and ephemeral objects, the Disaster Paintings often illustrate robust, man-made structures, such as factories and train cars, that exhibit a level of fragility in their propensity to be unhinged by catastrophic events. Distinguished for combining such subject matter with industrial materials, such as tar and Masonite tiles, the Disaster Paintings exemplify in both media and concept the vulnerability of the most progressive manufactured elements of modern culture.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramic Competition

The University of Dallas is proud to host the 2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramic Competition. The exhibition will gather contemporary ceramic artworks, both functional and sculptural, from 45 artists of the Southwest region. These featured works have been selected by this year’s juror, internationally acclaimed ceramic artist and professor, Virginia Marsh, who is also currently an artist-in-residence at the university. The opening reception is Monday, February 13, at 6:30pm–9:00pm, with a lecture presentation by Virginia Marsh, followed by the presentation of two “Best of Show” awards. The exhibition is free and open to the public from January 18 until March 13, 2017.

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery will host the 2017 University of Dallas Regional Juried Ceramics Competition from Wednesday, Jan. 18, to Monday, March 13.  Marsh will also present a lecture detailing the featured works selected for the exhibit on Monday, Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the Art History Auditorium. A reception and awards presentation will follow from 7 to 9 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the regional ceramic exhibit has become one of the premier competitions for both new and established ceramicists — 45 separate artists will be featured in this year’s exhibit, which provides visitors an overview of contemporary ceramic art from throughout the Southwest.

Before coming to the University of Dallas, Marsh taught ceramics for 20 years at the University of Louisville, served as editorial adviser to Chilton Book Company and published numerous articles and photos of her own work.

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is located in the Art History Building at the corner of Gorman Drive and Haggar Circle on the University of Dallas campus at 1845 E. Northgate Drive in Irving. The gallery, which is part of the Haggerty Art Village, is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.Saturday noon to 5 p.m. and Sunday12:30 to 5 p.m. For more gallery information, visit www.udallas.edu/gallery or call 972-721-5087.