Tag: Agustín Arteaga

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

José Clemente Orozco The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926 Oil on canvas Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm) Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

José Clemente Orozco
The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926
Oil on canvas
Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm)
Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

 

México 1900–1950 Highlights New Narratives in Mexico’s Modern Art History

It’s a happy new year. This month the DMA issued its press release publicly announcing the exciting addition of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde to the Museum’s exhibition schedule. The exhibition, curated by Dr. Agustín Arteaga, opened at the Grand Palais in Paris this past October, where it has received great public and critical acclaim. México 1900–1950 offers a renewed vision of Mexican art from the first half of the 20th century through a faithful account of the ambitious spirit of this major period of national artistic history. The impact of cultural activity in Mexico from the end of the long civil war (the Mexican revolt of 1910–20) until the beginning of the 1950s was indeed a singular phenomenon and can be seen in the works presented in México 1900–1950.
The exhibition, with the DMA serving as the only North American venue and the only venue outside of Paris, has already received tremendous support from the DMA community in the brief weeks since its inclusion in the DMA lineup of exhibitions this spring, and the DMA looks forward to inviting our community to discover more of the fabric of Mexico’s art history beginning March 12.

 

 

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Dr. Chu Comes to Dallas

On November 29, NEA Chairman Jane Chu visited Dallas as the featured speaker for the Dallas Arts District Community Breakfast. Afterwards, she visited the DMA with Gary Gibbs, Executive Director of the Texas Commission on the Arts, for a tour led by Agustín Arteaga of the Conservation Studio and the African and Contemporary Art galleries, with senior curators Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and Gavin Delahunty, The Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, offering commentary. Her visit ended with a presentation by Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education and Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences, and Ingrid Van Haastrecht, Director of Development Operations and Analysis, on the progress of the NEA grant the DMA received to conduct an evaluation of the South Dallas community and how they engage with the Museum. Dr. Chu’s visit was chronicled the following day in this article in the Dallas Morning News.

 

 

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

After four and a half groundbreaking years at the DMA, Mark Leonard, the Museum’s first Chief Conservator, will be retiring—for the second time—to the sun-drenched California desert. Leonard stepped down in 2010 as the Head of the Paintings Conservation Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum to pursue his career as an artist. His DMA appointment in 2012 signaled the initial phase of the development of the Museum’s conservation program, which included the addition of staff and the renovation of its on-site spaces to include a paintings conservation studio.

While at the DMA, Leonard carefully stewarded the collection and built a robust and comprehensive conservation program. He was responsible for carrying out major treatments on over 60 works of art, restoring a range of works, from a rare early Renaissance Spanish panel painting, to Jacques Blanchard’s 17th-century oil painting Zeus and Semele, to a work by Texas artist Julian Onderdonk that had been confined to storage for decades because of its poor state of preservation. Leonard also collaborated with private collectors on the study and care of their collections in order to present the work in the Museum galleries for all to see.

Under Leonard’s direction, the DMA also established a network of regional conservation partnerships with museums in North Texas and local universities to collaborate on conservation research and the study of individual works. Although he will surely be missed, the impact of his time at the DMA will not soon be forgotten—and evidence of it will continue to be seen throughout our institution.

 

Report of the Director

Richard Brettell - AH - Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies - Art History

Dr. Richard R. Brettell

The fall semester of 2016 has been almost volcanic with activity at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History. We have welcomed a new visiting scholar from the University of Victoria, Professor Allan Antliff, who is in Dallas for the 2016-2017 academic year to work on a new book dealing with contemporary art and anarchist philosophy. Allan and I became friends through our mutual study of Camille Pissarro, whose anarchism is well known, and my students and I have learned a great deal from his imaginative and morally bracing kind of art history. His presence at UT Dallas will result not only in a major book but also in a long-term collaboration with the superb art history faculty at the University of Victoria, a collaboration which will be enriched by the presence on campus of Dr. Melia Belli-Bose of the University of Victoria in the spring term of 2017.

Most recently we co-organized with the Ackerman Center a symposium on the School of London, the post-WWII painters of Britain that included Freud, Bacon, Kossoff, Auerbach, Andrews, and Kitaj. The symposium coincided with a major exhibition of the group at the Getty. We have also planned a symposium with our colleagues at the Crow Collection of Asian Art devoted to the global ceramics trade centered in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Puebla, Mexico. The markets of Puebla linked the Islamic ceramic tradition via Spain with the Chinese tradition via the Mexican-ruled Phillipines and the Manila galleons.

Our goal of making our DMA headquarters a “Living Room” for art historians in Dallas-Fort Worth continues to advance, and later this month we will welcome as many of our metroplex colleagues as possible to meet the DMA’s new director, Agustín Arteaga. Our schedule of workshops masterminded by Lauren LaRocca continues apace, involving O’Donnell Institute scholars and fellows as well as distinguished guests.

This fall, we have also had a good many distinguished visitors to the Institute’s UT Dallas home, including Mr. and Mrs. O’Donnell, UT Dallas’s new President, Dr. Richard Benson, and the French Ambassador, Gérard Araud.

French Ambassador Gérard Araud (middle) and Consul General of France Sujiro Seam (right) visit EODIAH

French Ambassador Gérard Araud (middle) and Consul General of France Sujiro Seam (right) visit EODIAH

 

For me, the semester is filled with preparations for the lectures in what might well be the largest course in UT Dallas’s history, Introduction to the Visual Arts, taught to an eager group of almost 350 undergraduates in the lecture hall of the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology building. Using works of art in Dallas-Fort Worth museums as portals onto other places and other times, I endeavor to excite UT Dallas’s supremely intelligent undergraduates, the vast majority of whom major in sciences, technology, management, or social sciences, to pause and think about human history and its artistic and architectural heritage.

We have also progressed this term in our partnerships with the Wildenstein Institute in Paris, the Capodimonte Museum in Naples, the Swiss Institute of Art History in Zurich, the University of Victoria, and, soon, a new Institute for the Study of American Art at the University of Nanjing in China.

Not bad for a little more than two years.

 

Richard R. Brettell, Ph.D.

Founding Director, The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History and the Margaret McDermott Distinguished Chair

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

DMA_Logo_Print_CMYK_2Color

Photo credit Paloma Torres

Photo credit Paloma Torres

Welcome Agustín Arteaga

In July, the DMA announced the exciting appointment of the Museum’s new Eugene McDermott Director, Agustín Arteaga. Arteaga, who officially joined the Museum in September, most recently served as director at the Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL) in Mexico City, one of Mexico’s largest and most prominent cultural institutions, presenting work from the mid-16th through the mid-20th centuries. Prior to his tenure at MUNAL, Arteaga was the director of the Museo de Arte de Ponce (MAP) in Puerto Rico and the founding director of the contemporary art museum Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (MALBA) Fundación Costantini in Argentina. Arteaga has organized more than one hundred exhibitions over the course of his career, including major monographic presentations of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Diego Rivera; survey exhibitions of French Impressionism and old master works; and thematic exhibitions that have stretched across centuries and cultures. Born in Mexico City, Arteaga received an MA (1999) and PhD (2006) from Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) and a BS in architecture (1980) from Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, both in Mexico City.

Diviners headdress (nkaka), Tabwa peoples, mid–20th century, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Africa, leather, fiber, beads, and feathers, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Cecil and Ida Green Foundation 1999.62

Diviners headdress (nkaka), Tabwa peoples, mid–20th century, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Africa, leather, fiber, beads, and feathers, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of The Cecil and Ida Green Foundation 1999.62

Bead It

Dr. Richard Brettell and Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, the DMA’s Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art, with assistance from her colleague Dr. Kimberly Jones, The Ellen and Harry S. Parker III Assistant Curator of the Arts of the Americas, collaborated on the art installation in the Institute’s DMA Research Center vitrine. The idea for the installation stems from the extraordinary gift by Dallas jewelry designer Velma Davis Dozier (1901–1988) of thousands of trade beads to the Museum. The beads have their origins in Europe but were traded in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Pacific. The historic objects on view convey the geographic breadth of such “trade beads,” along with the continued abundance of commercial beads today. The beaded objects from the DMA’s collection range from the mid-19th century through the 20th century. Selected by Dr. Walker, these wearable artworks come from Indonesia, Africa, South and North America. They represent the impact of European traders across other continents of the world.

 

Flora and Fauna

In December, the DMA will present Art and Nature in the Middle Ages, an exhibition featuring extraordinary works of art from the 12th through the 16th century that emphasize the vital union between humans and nature. The exhibition, organized by the Musée de Cluny, musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, and on view exclusively in the U.S. at the DMA, is composed of more than one hundred objects reflecting the wide range of styles, techniques, and iconography that flourished during this period. Accompanying the exhibition is a publication featuring thematic essays available for the first time in English and a fully illustrated checklist. Edited by Dr. Nicole R. Myers, the DMA’s Lillian and James H. Clark Curator of European Painting and Sculpture, the catalogue celebrates nature’s constant presence in the immediate environment and spiritual life of men and women in the Middle Ages.

Scene of chivalry from the Seigniorial Life tapestry cycle, Southern Netherlands, c. 1510–1520, wool and silk, Musée de Cluny, musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, CL 2179 Photo © RMN-Grand Palais (musée de Cluny - musée national du Moyen-Âge) / Franck Raux

Scene of chivalry from the Seigniorial Life tapestry cycle, Southern Netherlands, c. 1510–1520, wool and silk, Musée de Cluny, musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris, CL 2179 Photo © RMN-Grand Palais (musée de Cluny – musée national du Moyen-Âge) / Franck Raux

 

Across the Pond

The Museum’s The Seine at Lavacourt by Claude Monet is currently on a brief European tour. The painting is part of an exhibition exploring the work of Charles-Francois Daubigny and his influence on French landscape painting, with a focus on the work of Daubigny, Monet, and van Gogh. Monet’s 1880 water landscape is on view at the Scottish National Gallery through early October as part of the Inspiring Impressionism: Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh before traveling to the Van Gogh Museum in late October. The painting will return to the DMA following the final presentation in Amsterdam in late January 2017.

Claude Monet, The Seine at Lavacourt, 1880, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Munger Fund 1938.4.M

Claude Monet, The Seine at Lavacourt, 1880, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Munger Fund 1938.4.M

 

On View at the DMA This Fall

Nicolas Party: Pathway
Through February 12, 2017
Concourse
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Concentrations 60: Lucie Stahl
September 16, 2016–March 12, 2017
Hoffman Galleries
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Waxed: Batik from Java
September 25, 2016–September 10, 2017
Level 3
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt
October 9, 2016–January 8, 2017
Chilton Gallery I

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail
November 18, 2016–November 12, 2017
Focus Gallery II
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Art and Nature in the Middle Ages
December 4, 2016–March 19, 2017
Chilton Gallery II
U.S. exclusive venue