Tag: Art of Examination

Art and Medicine at EODIAH

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UT Dallas

EODIAH’s Art and Medicine programs continue to flourish. Bonnie Pitman, who launched Art and Medicine at The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at UT Dallas, has been busy this Spring lecturing at UT Dallas, teaching her Art of Examination course through UT Southwestern, and advancing her research at the Center for Brain Health.

UT Dallas Lectures

In March, Pitman gave a lecture “The Art of Healing: New Approaches for Physicians and Patients” as part of the UT Dallas Arts and Humanities Symbiosis: Where Science Meets Art lecture series. Symbiosis is a UT Dallas campus group whose focus on the intersection between art and science aims to incorporate art education into science-focused degree programs. Pitman’s talk discussed artists with illnesses, nuances of observation, and EODIAH’s Art and Medicine programs that focus on close observation of works of art as used by medical schools to improve diagnostic practices with patients.

This Spring, Pitman gave a talk to UT Dallas undergraduate and graduate students in Professor Greg Metz’s Gallery Studies course at the new S/PN Gallery that focused on her research called the Power of Observation and her tenure as Executive Director of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Additionally, Pitman conducted two gallery tours this term for EODIAH art historians and guests at the Dallas Museum of Art, examining its collection through the lens of Art and Medicine and the Power of Observation.

Bonnie Pitman leads EODIAH scholars in Art and Medicine tour at the Dallas Museum of Art

Baylor Surgery Physicians & Residents retreat

 

On April 17, Pitman hosted 55 Baylor University Medical Center surgery physicians and residents, along with their instructors, at the Dallas Museum of Art for an all-day retreat in Art and Medicine.  Students were immersed in the museum’s galleries to receive training on close-looking, learning new skills on how to talk about art, relate to art, and relate to one another as well as completing team exercises focused on developing new communication and observation skills.

Baylor medical students engage in observational activities in the Dallas Museum of Art galleries

 

Art of Examination 

Finishing its fourth year, UT Southwestern’s preclinical elective The Art of Examination will see 32 new medical students having gained instruction on using the power of art to enhance their observation, communication, and empathy skills.

Bonnie Pitman leads the course with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator; and Dallas Museum of Art educators Lindsay O’Connor and Amy Copeland.

This term’s sessions included Artists as Patients/Healing and the Arts, Mindfulness and Burnout, Visual Investigation with Art: The Human Form, Empathy and Compassion held at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, UT Southwestern Medical Campus, and a special visit to a private collector’s home.

In each class, students gain new perspectives enhanced by interactive exercises that address topics including conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout, and cultural influences.

Art of Examination students at the Dallas Museum of Art

Bonnie Pitman lectures at the Brain Performance Institute, Center for Brain Health, UT Dallas

Center for Brain Health

As the Director of Art – Brain Innovations at the UT Dallas Center for BrainHealth, Bonnie Pitman continues to expand her research and teaching on the art of observation relative to neuroscience. She held sessions for people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers that provided strategies to improve brain performance around her initiatives Do Something New®, her daily practice of focus and celebration of making an ordinary day extraordinary while dealing with chronic illness, and the Power of Observation, an initiative that connects neurological research with the experience and process of seeing, looking and observing.  The Power of Observation was also the focus on her lecture in the “Sips and Science” series at the Brain Performance Institute, in which she explored how deeper stages of observation allow for greater concentration and attending in life. Drawing on works of art in the Dallas Museum of Art’s collection, Pitman’s programs at the Center for Brain Health develop skills for attending, connecting, analyzing, interpreting and creating, engaging participants in learning about art history. She will further these subjects by developing workshops this fall.

Art and Medicine at EODIAH

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UT Dallas

The Art and Medicine program headed by UT Dallas Distinguished Scholar in Residence Bonnie Pitman began this year with many exciting new developments.

 

New Publications

 

Pitman published an article in The Journal of American Medicine Association (JAMA) highlighting contemporary artist Beverly Fishman, whose large-scale, pill-shaped reliefs explore intersections between the pharmaceutical industry, colors and surfaces of drugs, and relationships with illness. Fishman veneers her pill forms with slick layers of jarringly vibrant colors that shift and vibrate based on viewer perception. The confrontation of these wall-mounted abstractions with names such as “Untitled (Stacked Pills)” are meant to spark dialogue concerning the myriad ways medications have permeated and inform our culture.

Read the article, “Pharma Art – Abstract Medication in the Work of Beverly Fishman,” Journal of the American Medical Association here

Read more about Beverly Fishman

 

Beverly Fishman, Untitled (Stacked Pills), 2016 (right: detail). Urethane paint on wood, 149.9 cm × 121.9 cm × 5.1 cm. Photo courtesy of PD Rearick.

 

 

 

 

 

Art of Examination

 

This Spring 2018 semester sees 32 medical students from UT Southwestern enrolled in The Art of Examination, a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Now in its fourth year, Bonnie Pitman with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator; and Dallas Museum of Art educators Lindsay O’Connor and Amy Copeland, instructs students in using the power of art to learn observation and communication skills related to working with patients.

 

Sessions are held at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus to address topics including conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout, and cultural influences. Students learn to synthesize personal observations, knowledge, and experiences as they gain awareness of collaborative thinking and communication processes. The class engages students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences all designed to cultivate skills beneficial to clinical practice.

 

Art of Examination students learn new ways of relating to art by mirroring poses in the DMA’s European Art galleries.

 

Art of Examination students explore connections between art and science at the DMA Conservation Lab with DMA conservator Laura Hartman

 

 

Center for Brain Health

 

As the newly-named Director of Art – Brain Innovations at the UT Dallas Center for BrainHealth, Bonnie Pitman expands her research and teaching of the art of observation, meditation, and compassion. This Spring, Pitman will develop lectures and workshops that provide strategies to improve brain performance around her initiatives Do Something New®, her daily practice of focus and celebration of making an ordinary day extraordinary while dealing with chronic illness, and the Power of Observation, an initiative that connects neurological research with the experience and process of seeing, looking and observing.

 

Register for Bonnie Pitman’s upcoming Sips and Science talk on DO Something New!

April 12, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Center for Brain Health Campus

 

Art and Medicine Updates

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UT Dallas

Bonnie Pitman continues to make major advancements in her work on Art and Medicine at UT Dallas. Her recent publications in the Dallas Morning News and San Antonio Medicine highlight her continuing initiatives to expand the awareness of the national movement teaching medical students the art of close-looking, developing empathy and dealing with ambiguity through looking at works at the Dallas Museum of Art.  Pitman’s feature in Zócalo Public Square focuses on her life-long dedication to art museum engagement and the successful practices she implemented at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Dr. Heather Wickless, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education at the Dallas Museum of Art are commencing plans to join Pitman in teaching the 2018 class for UT Southwestern Medical School students.

 

St. Louis University Keynote and the St. Louis Art Museum Gallery Tour with Physicians and Educators

 

 Pitman has been invited to deliver a keynote lecture and grand rounds at Saint Louis University (SLU)’s Art History Department this Fall 2017, to art history faculty and students, health professionals and students, and art educators. Her talk “The Art of Examination: Art and Medicine Explored” provides an overview of the current art in medicine programs around the country and her work at UT Southwestern Medical School, teaching medical students skills for close observation, empathy, communication and dealing with ambiguity through close looking at art. She will also facilitate an educational session in the St. Louis Art Museum (SLAM) galleries with members of the museum’s Learning & Engagement team and physicians at the Medical School using objects in the museum’s collection to share her unique methods of merging art and medical teaching.

 

New Publications

Dallas Morning News 

“Universities partner with Dallas Museum of Art to teach medical students importance of empathy”

San Antonio Medicine 

The Art of Examination: Medical School and Art Museum Partnerships”

Zocalo Public Square

“Want to Find New Audiences? Keep Trying New Things”

Art of Examination Spring 2017 Course at UT Southwestern Medical School

Medical students in the UT Southwestern – UT Dallas course Art of Examination are on the go this semester learning how to look at art using the collections of Dallas’s premier art collections. Classes having been taking place between The Dallas Museum of Art, The Warehouse, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and Clements Hospital. Lessons address mindfulness, collaboration, and interpretation with exercises on slowing down to spend time looking at works of art, looking and communicating as a team, and creating multiple interpretations to generate new ideas.

Art of Examination students practice close looking at The Warehouse

Art of Examination students practice close looking at The Warehouse

 

Mindfulness in action in the Art of Examination medical school course

Mindfulness in action in the Art of Examination medical school course

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artworks, students in the course improve visual literacy skills, which are the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artworks. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction.

The Art of Examination is taught by Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, UT Dallas; Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education, Dallas Museum of Art; and Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator.

Art of Examination Spring 2017 Course at UT Southwestern Medical School

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course will improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction. We discuss factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice. Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice. The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

The Art of Examination is taught at Dallas art institutions such as The Dallas Museum of Art, pictured.  Images courtesy of ArtDocs.

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, continues to make advances in the field of Art and Medicine.  This Spring 2017 semester she will continue to teach The Art of Examination course through UT Southwestern Medical School with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education, Dallas Museum of Art; and Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator.

The Art of Examination is a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Through experiences with artwork, students in the course improve visual literacy skills, which is the ability to observe, analyze, interpret, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image and relates to both examining patients as well as artwork. The course uses the power of art to promote the analysis and communication necessary in addressing ambiguity in the physical exam and patient interaction.

Art of Examination Course 2017 II

At The Dallas Museum of Art

The class discusses factors influencing what we see, and how we interpret visual information. Other topics include conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout and cultural influences, with their implications for medical practice.  Participants will cultivate habits of close observation, inspection, and cognitive reflections to shape his or her early medical career. Students will learn to synthesize observations and one’s own knowledge and experiences as well as an awareness of the collaborative thinking process of the group, a skill vital to successful clinical practice.

The class will engage students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences that will foster communication. This is not an art history class and students need no previous training in art to participate. The course meets in accordance with the schedule at The Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus.

At The Dallas Museum of Art

At The Dallas Museum of Art

EODIAH Launches Art and Medicine Resources Website

Distinguished Scholar in Residence at UT Dallas Bonnie Pitman’s major advances in the field of Art Museum and Medical School Partnerships has led to the establishment of the new Art and Medicine resource site hosted by The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History: www.utdallas.edu/arthistory/medicine.

The Art Museum and Medical School Partnerships initiative centers on the advancement of medical students, interns, residents and fellows being taught to look at works of art and in turn relating that to their professional practices. By doing so, they develop observation, interpretative, empathic and collaborative skills in order to enhance their clinical diagnosis and practices.

With the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Pitman organized a landmark gathering called The Art of Examination: Art Museums and Medical School Partnerships that brought together more than 135 leading art museum and medical school professionals at a two-day convening on June 8 and 9, 2016, held at MoMA.

The Forum was designed to share information about programs and partnerships between the art community and the medical community and was the largest gathering of professionals dedicated to work in this area and the first time that many had an opportunity to exchange information and ideas about these programs.

Research conducted during the development of The Art of Examination: Art Museums and Medical School Partnerships Forum led to the compilation of critical resource materials for art museum and medical school partnerships including a Bibliography of research articles, studies, and books relating to the field; a list of Program Descriptions of 70 partnered programs; and a selection of course Syllabi.

The new site also serves as documentation of The Art of Examination Forum. Pitman’s Report on the Forum summarizes the gathering and describes next steps in moving the field forward. A Summary showcases highlights from the Forum with photographs. The Forum’s Program with list of speakers, Roster of attendance, PowerPoint Presentations of plenary and Idea Exchange sessions, and video Recordings of the main sessions bring to life the important ideas brought forth and collaborations formed from the Forum.

As the number, variety and purpose of collaborative art museum and medical education programs are expanding, networks for research, evaluation and future convenings are advancing. The Edith O’Donnell Institute for Art History will continue to provide access to resources on the Art and Medicine website at www.utdallas.edu/arthistory/medicine.

The Art of Examination Forum held teaching demonstrations in the MoMA galleries. Photo: Manuel Martagon.

The Art of Examination Forum held teaching demonstrations in the MoMA galleries. Photo: Manuel Martagon.

 

Press

Press of the Forum has been overwhelmingly positive including a feature in The New York Times.

 

Read the article from The New York Times here:

How an Aesthete’s Eye Can Help a Doctor’s Hand

 

Read the full press release from UTDallas here:

O’Donnell Art History Institute Launches New Online Resource

 

Read the article from the American Association of Museum Directors here:

Bonnie Pitman’s Commitment to Art and Medicine

The Art of Examination: Art Museum and Medical School Partnerships Forum

(Pictured left to right) Wendy Woon, The Edward John Noble Foundation Deputy Director for Education and Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence.

(Pictured left to right) Wendy Woon, The Edward John Noble Foundation Deputy Director for Education and Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence.

The Art of Examination: Art Museums and Medical School Partnerships brought together over 130 leading professionals in these fields at a two day convening on June 8 and 9, 2016 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The Forum was organized by Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the University of Texas at Dallas. The Forum was generously supported by the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, which also hosts the website with the content from the meeting.

Planning for the conference included Wendy Woon, The Edward John Noble Foundation Deputy Director for Education at MoMA, a team from MoMA’s Education Department, colleagues at The Frick Collection and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dr. Joel Katz and Dr. Elizabeth Gaufberg from Harvard Medical School, and Ray Williams from the Blanton Museum of Art at UT Austin.

The Forum was designed to share information about the variety of programs and partnerships that engage medical students, interns, residents and fellows in learning to look at works of art to develop observational, interpretative, empathic, and collaborative skills in order to enhance their clinical diagnosis and practices. Information on research and evaluation studies was also shared

The goals of The Art of Examination: Art Museums and Medical School Partnerships were:

  • to explore new program ideas and formats for engaging medical schools and art museums to deepen awareness of looking closely and responding creatively to works of art and relating these to clinical practice;
  • to connect with a network of collaborators working in this field;
  • and to translate ideas into action for future innovations in programs, research and partnerships.

MoMA_Art_Examination

Participation in the Forum was by invitation and required an art museum professional and medical educator who partner in a museum-based program to attend together. The reason for the team participation was to increase collaboration and shared information among the partner institutions and to highlight the complementary areas of expertise that each partner brings to this work.

Sixty medical schools attended including Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Colorado School of Medicine, The University of Colorado Medical School, Harvard Medical School, Mayo Clinic Center in the Humanities, Stanford School of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, University of Virginia Medical School, and Yale School of Medicine.

Sixty art museums participated including the Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Dallas Museum of Art, The Frick Collection, The Hood Museum of Art, The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art, and Yale Center for British Art.

Participation in the Forum was defined by the capacity of MoMA’s auditorium and workshop spaces.  Over 40 professionals who could not be accommodated were on the waiting list and many more expressed interest in attending because of a desire to develop similar programs and partnerships.

The number and variety of art museum and medical school programs continues to expand and the participants in the Forum offered ideas to inform the field  and create opportunities to exchange teaching methodologies and establish networks for research and evaluation and future convenings.

Approaches to Art Objects session included the Master Course "Drawing and Touching" in the MoMA galleries

Approaches to Art Objects session included the Master Course “Drawing and Touching” in the MoMA galleries

From Forum participants:

This experience opened my eyes to so many new ideas. It strengthened my partnership with my medical school counterpart. It spurred even more questions than I had coming into it. I loved the variety of formats and activities and felt so privileged to have the opportunity to participate.
-  Molly Medakovich, PhD, Teaching Specialist, Adult Programs, Denver Art Museum

It was an invaluable experience to be at the Forum with my health affairs colleagues, to hear, see, and discuss so many other programs, and to process what we learned together.  – Carolyn Allmendinger,
Director of Academic Programs, Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

“Wonderful to bring the various disciplines together in conversation – museum educators and medical educators. So much to learn from each other! – Perspective enhancing!”  – Elizabeth Gaufberg, Harvard Medical School

From around the web
“MoMA shows museums can be relevant beyond art appreciation”, Wendy Woon for the Daily News

Photos: Manuel Martagon