Tag: Dallas Museum of Art

Art and Medicine at EODIAH

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UT Dallas

The Art and Medicine program headed by UTD Distinguished Scholar in Residence Bonnie Pitman began this year with many exciting new developments.

 

New Publications

 

Pitman published an article in The Journal of American Medicine Association (JAMA) highlighting contemporary artist Beverly Fishman, whose large-scale, pill-shaped reliefs explore intersections between the pharmaceutical industry, colors and surfaces of drugs, and relationships with illness. Fishman veneers her pill forms with slick layers of jarringly vibrant colors that shift and vibrate based on viewer perception. The confrontation of these wall-mounted abstractions with names such as “Untitled (Stacked Pills)” are meant to evoke dialogue concerning the myriad of ways medications have permeated and inform our culture.

“Pharma Art – Abstract Medication in the Work of Beverly Fishman.” Journal of the American Medical Association

Read the article here

 

Read more about Beverly Fishman

 

Beverly Fishman, Untitled (Stacked Pills), 2016 (right: detail). Urethane paint on wood, 149.9 cm × 121.9 cm × 5.1 cm. Photo courtesy of PD Rearick.

 

 

 

 

 

Art of Examination

 

This Spring 2018 semester sees 32 medical students from UT Southwestern enrolled in The Art of Examination, a preclinical elective focusing on developing skills for clinical diagnosis through looking at works of art. Now in its fourth year, Bonnie Pitman with faculty partners Heather Wickless, MD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, UTSW; Courtney Crothers, UTSW Art Curator; and Dallas Museum of Art educators Lindsay O’Connor and Amy Copeland, instructs students in using the power of art to learn observation and communication skills as related to working with patients.

 

Sessions are held at the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, The Warehouse, The Crow Collection of Asian Art, and UT Southwestern Medical Campus to address topics including conservation, artists with disease, empathy, physician burnout, and cultural influences. Students learn to synthesize personal observations, knowledge, and experiences as they gain awareness of collaborative thinking and communication processes. The class engages students in discussions, drawing and writing exercises, lectures, and interactive experiences all designed to cultivate skills beneficial to clinical practice.

 

Art of Examination students learn new ways of relating to art by mirroring poses in the DMA’s European Art galleries.

 

Art of Examination students explore connections between art and science at the DMA Conservation Lab with DMA conservator Laura Hartman

 

 

Center for Brain Health

 

As the newly-named Director of Art – Brain Innovations at the UTD Center for BrainHealth, Bonnie Pitman expands her research and teaching of the art of observation, meditation, and compassion. This Spring, Pitman will develop lectures and workshops that provide strategies to improve brain performance around her initiatives Do Something New®, her daily practice of focus and celebration of making an ordinary day extraordinary while dealing with chronic illness, and the Power of Observation, an initiative that connects neurological research with the experience and process of seeing, looking and observing.

 

Register for Bonnie Pitman’s upcoming Sips and Science talk on DO Something New!

April 12, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Center for Brain Health Campus

 

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

Henri Matisse drawing with bamboo pole tipped with charcoal in his studio, Nice, France. Photo by Robert Capa

 

 

 

 

The Institute has an exciting array of programs for the spring semester. We will welcome an impressive list of guest presenters from important institutions across the country. From the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton University, art historian Dr. Yve-Alain Bois will present his latest research on Henri Matisse’s adoption of the bamboo stick to draw his late stations of the cross, hosted by the Nasher Sculpture Center on March 27, 6:00 p.m. Our Visiting Research Professor Dr. Suzanne Preston Blier will give a public lecture on her book project on Picasso’s Demoiselles d’Avignon and his diverse sources of inspiration for the iconic work on April 5, 7:00 p.m. at the Dallas Museum of Art. Dr. Thomas Gaehtgens, Director of the Getty Research Institute, will discuss the impact of Gilded Age American collectors on Europe’s artistic patrimony from the perspective of the great German museum director Wilhelm von Bode on April 10, 7:30 p.m. at the DMA. Our graduate fellows will present their dissertation research throughout the semester, with topics ranging from early modern playbook title pages to new media race humor. The spring will culminate with Intersections: Visual Cultures of Islamic Cosmopolitanism, a collaboration between the O’Donnell Institute; the Islamic Art Revival Series, a program of the Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation; and the Agha Khan Council in Dallas. The symposium will be on May 4 – 5 at UT Dallas, the DMA, and Ismaili Jamatkhana Plano.

 

Our fifth vitrine exhibition, selected by DMA Curator Dr. Anne Bromberg, will be installed in late March. It will display a collection of Asian ceramics that correlate with Dr. Bromberg’s current exhibition, Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road, that highlights the passage of luxury goods along the Silk Road between Asia, India, and Uzbekistan, among others. Be sure to spend time in the exhibition on Level 3 at the DMA before heading downstairs to see the ceramics on display in our vitrine.

 

We hope you can join us this spring at our many programs and look forward to the dialogues created by the new scholarship presented. Visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ and plan your calendar!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Dallas Museum of Art News and Exhibitions

New Year, NICE Numbers
The DMA began the new year with a record-setting end to 2017. In calendar year 2017, 882,451 people visited the Museum, a 25% increase over last year, marking the best calendar year yet since returning to free general admission in January 2013. In July we announced that the DMA had ended its 2017 fiscal year with its highest attendance in a decade, and the second highest in the Museum’s history. The Museum welcomed 802,870 visitors in FY 2017, with the landmark presentation of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde drawing more than 125,000 visitors, and making Eugene McDermott Director Dr. Agustín Arteaga’s first anniversary a truly happy one.

Vision Seeking
The year 2018 also began with the opening of Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit, curated by Dr. Kimberly L. Jones. A wonderful example of the DMA’s continued commitment to presenting diverse cultures and the best art each createsT, the DMA is honored to be the first location outside of the Museum of Northern Arizona to show the impressive mural by Hopi artists Michael Kabotie and Delbridge Honanie. This beautiful work depicts the history of the Hopi people and is accompanied by significant works from the DMA’s collection, from ancient to contemporary. Ed Kabotie, Michael’s son, was in Dallas for the opening week of the exhibition, where he shared his story as an artist, as well as the story of his father and Delbridge as artists. The exhibition is included in free general admission and on view through early December.

Hopi Visions was Dr. Jones’s last exhibition at the DMA. She and her husband are moving to Abu Dhabi, where he has accepted a new position.

Julian Onderdonk, Untitled (Field of Bluebonnets), Dallas Museum of Art

Ambassador Row
This winter four works from the DMA’s collection will be installed at Truman Hall in Brussels, Belgium, the US NATO Mission residence of The Honorable Kay Bailey Hutchison, the US Ambassador to NATO. The Ambassador, who previously served as a US Senator from Texas, requested the DMA works through the State Department’s “Art in Embassies” program to promote cultural diplomacy. They include paintings by Lone Star State artists Frank Klepper, Reveau Bassett, and Julian Onderdonk, and the incomparable British statesman and “Sunday” painter Winston Churchill. The DMA “NATO exhibition” will remain on view for up to three years to coincide with Ambassador Hutchison’s tour of duty.

Five Decades of Deep Commitment
In January, Texas Instruments and the TI Foundation announced the establishment of a philanthropic fellowship program to honor its founders’ long legacy of giving back. Funded by a $2.1 million TI Foundation grant, the TI Founders Leadership Fellows program provides three annual nonprofit work experiences to university or graduate students planning a nonprofit career. The fellowships, designed to build a pipeline of nonprofit leaders in the Dallas area over the next 20 years, were established in collaboration with three local organizations with strong ties to TI’s founders: the Dallas Museum of Art, the University of Texas at Dallas, and United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

The TI Foundation, which has provided tremendous support to the DMA for over half a century, is also a presenting sponsor this year of The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana. Organized by the DMA and inspired by the Museum’s collection, it is the first American museum exhibition dedicated to Asante regalia in over 30 years.

Jacques Blanchard, Zeus and Semele, c. 1632, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art

Piet Mondrian, The Sea (Ocean 2) (verso), Dallas Museum of Art

Woman with a Lamp (1909) , Dallas Museum of Art

Three Gifts of Art by Three European Masters
The DMA recently announced the gift of three major works of European art that reflect the extraordinary generosity of Dallas collectors and their dedication to expanding the Museum’s collection in meaningful ways. Zeus and Semele is a recently rediscovered masterwork by the important 17th-century Baroque painter Jacques Blanchard. Although not as well known today–a fate related to the artist’s early death at 37 and resulting scarcity of his work—Blanchard was celebrated in his day for his richly hued and sensual subjects inspired by 16th-century Venetian painting. Through the generosity of collectors Thomas C. and Jeanne Campbell, who gifted this exceedingly rare and remarkable painting to the Museum’s Foundation for the Arts Collection, the DMA continues to expand its Old Master collection with exceptional works of art.

Ann Jacobus Folz’s gave two amazing examples of European Modernism reinforcing the Museum’s impressive holdings of early 20th-century art. The first is an impressive scaled, double-sided charcoal drawing by the modern master Piet Mondrian, the eleventh example by Mondrian to enter the collection. The DMA has the second largest holdings of his work in the U.S. thanks to the continued generous giving of Dallas collectors. The front side boasts an evocative, almost painterly drawing that relates closely to the painting Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening (c. 1916) in the Museum’s collection. On the back, an abstract composition titled The Sea (Ocean 2) reveals the beginning of Mondrian’s move away from representational imagery toward the grid structure that would become a hallmark of later works. “This crucial intermediary phase of Mondrian’s stylistic development was, until now, missing from the collection,” noted Dr. Nicole Myers, the DMA’s Lillian and James H. Clark Curator of European Painting and Sculpture. “With this gift, our visitors will be able to experience the dramatic transformation of Mondrian’s approach—from Post-Impressionism to Abstraction—as it unfolds across the walls of our galleries.”

The Museum also acquired from Folz a significant painting by Pierre Bonnard, its seventeenth work by this influential Modern artist. In spite of the Museum’s deep holdings, Woman with a Lamp (1909) is the first acquisition that captures Bonnard’s transition from the decorative Nabi aesthetic of the 1890s to his more abstract, brightly hued paintings from the 1920s on.

On view at the DMA this Winter/Spring:

Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins
Stoffel Quadrant Gallery

Young Masters 2018
February 24 to April 15, 2018
Concourse
Exclusively at the DMA

Edward Steichen: In Exaltation of Flowers
Through May 13, 2018
Rachofsky Quadrant Gallery
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Paris at the Turn of the Century
Through May 27, 2018
Level 2
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Laura Owens
March 25 to July 29, 2018
Hoffman Galleries

The Power of Gold: Asante Royal Regalia from Ghana
April 15 to August 12, 2018
Chilton
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Hopi Visions: Journey of the Human Spirit
Through December 2, 2018
Focus II
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road
Through December 9, 2018
Level 3
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery
Through April 26, 2020
Focus I
DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Art and Medicine Updates

Bonnie Pitman, Distinguished Scholar in Residence, UT Dallas

Bonnie Pitman continues to make major advancements in her work on Art and Medicine at UT Dallas. Her recent publications in the Dallas Morning News and San Antonio Medicine highlight her continuing initiatives to expand the awareness of the national movement teaching medical students the art of close-looking, developing empathy and dealing with ambiguity through looking at works at the Dallas Museum of Art.  Pitman’s feature in Zócalo Public Square focuses on her life-long dedication to art museum engagement and the successful practices she implemented at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Dr. Heather Wickless, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education at the Dallas Museum of Art are commencing plans to join Pitman in teaching the 2018 class for UT Southwestern Medical School students.

 

St. Louis University Keynote and the St. Louis Art Museum Gallery Tour with Physicians and Educators

 

 Pitman has been invited to deliver a keynote lecture and grand rounds at Saint Louis University (SLU)’s Art History Department this Fall 2017, to art history faculty and students, health professionals and students, and art educators. Her talk “The Art of Examination: Art and Medicine Explored” provides an overview of the current art in medicine programs around the country and her work at UT Southwestern Medical School, teaching medical students skills for close observation, empathy, communication and dealing with ambiguity through close looking at art. She will also facilitate an educational session in the St. Louis Art Museum (SLAM) galleries with members of the museum’s Learning & Engagement team and physicians at the Medical School using objects in the museum’s collection to share her unique methods of merging art and medical teaching.

 

New Publications

Dallas Morning News 

“Universities partner with Dallas Museum of Art to teach medical students importance of empathy”

San Antonio Medicine 

The Art of Examination: Medical School and Art Museum Partnerships”

Zocalo Public Square

“Want to Find New Audiences? Keep Trying New Things”

EODIAH Fellow Edleeca Thompson at Symposium on African Art in Ghana

This past August, Edleeca Thompson, PhD Humanities Candidate and O’Donnell Institute Fellow, spent two weeks in Accra, Ghana, for the 17th Triennial Symposium on African Art. The Symposium was sponsored by the Arts Council of the African Studies Association (ACASA) and Brookhaven College and hosted by the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon. This was the first time in its 50-year history that the conference has been held in Africa and about 400 scholars, art historians, archaeologists, curators, and teachers from all over the world were in attendance. The Conference was particularly relevant for Edleeca’s work exploring the politics of displaying African art and the ways museums mediate presentation of the art between its contextual significance and the meaning for which it was originally produced.

Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana

Traveling with Dr. Roslyn Walker, Chief Curator and the Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, Edleeca attended a variety of lectures and talks including topics on African art history, Diaspora studies, contemporary African visual arts and performance, museum and collections practices, as well as other fields pertaining to African life and culture.

While in Accra, Edleeca also attended the opening reception for Phyllis Galembo’s Fancy Dress Masquerade exhibit at the Kempinski Hotel Gold Coast City, and visited many contemporary artists’ studios and galleries. In addition, Edleeca visited Cape Coast Castle, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, the Manhyia Palace and Prempeh II Museum, Bonwire Kente Village, and the famous Kente cloth and bronze casting workshops in the Ashanti region of Central Ghana.

 

Dallas Museum of Art News and Exhibitions

Image courtesy The Dallas Museum of Art

The New AOL (Art Online)

This summer the DMA unveiled a new way to access its online collection of encyclopedic art at DMA.org. The development of the enhanced site is part of the Museum’s ongoing digitization initiative to expand access to its encyclopedic collection, which recently reached more than 24,000 objects. The expanded online collection features an updated design that enables access to a larger quantity and variety of information, now providing a multitude of entry points and pathways to the Museum’s robust online resource. New additions to the online collection include an expanded screen layout that allows web visitors to explore catalogue essays, summaries of historical periods, artist biographies, and descriptions of techniques and their importance in certain regions or cultures. The fresh design also features teaching ideas produced by the Education Department alongside art historical essays. The enrichment of the Museum’s online content is supported by a grant from the O’Donnell Foundation, bestowed to the DMA in November 2013, to offer the entire collection online.

 

Image courtesy The Dallas Museum of Art

DMA to Host Three-Day Celebration of Islamic Art and Culture

Islamic Art Celebration: The Language of Exchange is a three-day event exploring Islamic art and culture in honor of the Keir Collection of Islamic Art, one of the most geographically and historically comprehensive private collections of Islamic art in the world. From November 16 through 18, Museum-goers are invited to view the exquisite works of art on view in the Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery and take part in special curated programming. Highlights include a keynote talk on the influence of global exchange on Islamic art with Dr. Sheila R. Canby, Curator in Charge of the Department of Islamic Art at New York’s Metropolitan Museum. Other scheduled talks include author, educator, and artist Eric Broug exploring the complex geometric patterns seen in Islamic art and architecture, and art historian Michael Falcetano speaking on objects from the Keir Collection that were made to be used in everyday life. With tours, musical performances, and artist demonstrations, visitors will have numerous ways to learn more about Islamic art and the influence it has had across cultures.

 

Image courtesy The Dallas Museum of Art

Spring Cleaning

It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, and when it comes to research that couldn’t be more true. Photographs in the DMA Archives have provided information on a variety of topics, from the Level 3 skylights and limestone cladding, to how an artwork was installed in an exhibition, to the design of an event, to what the Arts District looked like before it was an arts district. To facilitate the use of the Archives’ photography collections, the DMA recently completed a project that transformed boxes of photographs that were a bit disorganized into tidy, usefully arranged, helpfully described, and well preserved collections. Drawing on years of experience helping people find historic images, DMA Archivist Hillary Bober arranged the photographs into nine logical subject-based collections: Building, Collection Documentation, Development and Events, Education and Programming, Exhibition Installation, People, Publications, 90th Anniversary Timeline, and Miscellany.

 

 

Amedeo Modigliani, Boy in Short Pants, c. 1918, oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of the Leland Fikes Foundation, Inc. 1977.1; Piet Mondrian, Spring Sun (Lentezon): Castle Ruin: Brederode, c. late 1909–early 1910, oil on Masonite, Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, gift of the James H. and Lillian Clark Foundation, 1982.24.FA, © 2012 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International Washington DC info@mondriantrust.com

Modernism on the Road

Three well-known and well-loved works from the DMA’s European art collection are traveling across the Atlantic this fall to be featured in a trio of prestigious exhibitions focusing on some of the most memorable artists of the 20th century. Amedeo Modigliani’s painting Boy in Short Pants can be seen in the Tate Modern’s comprehensive retrospective of Modigliani’s work opening in November. At the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Piet Mondrian’s early masterwork Spring Sun (Lentezon): Castle Ruin: Brederode is included in The Dutch in Paris 1789–1914, which presents Paris through the work of eight Dutch artists and will later travel to the Petit Palais in Paris. Finally, Henri Matisse’s magnificent Still Life: Bouquet and Compotier will capture attention at Frankfurt’s Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie as part of Matisse-Bonnard: Long Live Painting!, the first exhibition in Germany to bring these key modern masters together.

 

 

Exhibitions

 

Multiple Selves: Portraits from Rembrandt to Rivera
Through November 5, 2017
Level 2
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail
Through November 12, 2017
Focus Gallery II
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

After Hours: Works by DMA Staff
Through November 26, 2017
Mezzanine 2
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery
Through April 28, 2019
Focus Gallery I
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Waxed: Batik from Java
Through December 3, 2017
Level 3
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Truth: 24 frames per second
October 22, 2017–January 28, 2018
Chilton Gallery I and Hoffman Galleries
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins
October 1, 2017–February 25, 2018
Stoffel Quadrant Gallery
DMA organized; exclusively at the DMA

Edward Steichen: In Exaltation of Flowers
September 2, 2017–May 13, 2018
Rachofsky Quadrant Gallery

DMA organized

 

Arts & Letters

Arts & Letters Live, the literary series of the Dallas Museum of Art, presents Walter Isaacson

Thursday, October 26, 7:30 p.m.

First Methodist Church of Dallas

From the author of the bestselling biographies Benjamin Franklin and Einstein comes Leonardo da Vinci, an engrossing portrayal of the world’s most creative genius. Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo’s notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Isaacson weaves a narrative connecting his art and science. He also illustrates how Leonardo’s genius stemmed from skills we can improve in ourselves – passionate curiosity, careful observation, and a playful imagination. Isaacson, University Professor of History at Tulane University, has also written the bestselling biographies Benjamin Franklin and Einstein; Isaacson has served as CEO of the Aspen Institute, chairman of CNN, and editor of Time magazine.

Enjoy a book signing with Isaacson following the event; tickets include a hardcover book.

For tickets, visit DMA.org/tickets or call 214-922-1818.

 

Dallas Museum of Art Announces Acquisition of Yayoi Kusama Mirror Room

All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins is the first Mirror Pumpkin Room created by Kusama Since 1991

The Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) announced the acquisition of Yayoi Kusama’s All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016), one of the artist’s signature Infinity Mirror Rooms. The installation is the first mirror pumpkin room created by Kusama since 1991, and the only Infinity Mirror Room of its kind in a North American collection. Showcasing Kusama’s singular approach to installation, the acquisition adds a new dimension to the representation of Conceptual art, Pop art, Minimalism and Surrealism in the DMA’s acclaimed modern and contemporary art collection. The work has been acquired through the generous support of collectors Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and will be on view October 1, 2017 through February 25, 2018.

“All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins provides opportunities to explore a range of contemporary art movements within our collection, as well as the undeniable influence of Kusama across decades,” said Agustín Arteaga, the DMA’s Eugene McDermott Director. “We are excited to share this boundary – pushing, experiential work with our visitors and to be the only museum in North America to have one of Kusama’s pumpkin-themed mirror rooms represented in our collection.”

With All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins, Kusama incorporates one of her quintessential symbols, the spotted pumpkin. Similar to her seminal pumpkin room, Mirror Room (Pumpkin) (1991), which was created for the Japanese Pavilion at the 1993 Venice Biennale, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins focuses the reflective chamber on a series of acrylic yellow gourds covered in black polka dots.Withthismorerecentwork,Kusamaexpandsonthe1991 MirrorRoombyallowingviewersto step inside the mirrored space and fully immerse themselves in Kusama’s creation, becoming part of the art. Drawing on several of Kusama’s characteristic themes, including infinity, the sublime and obsessive repetition, the work creates an immersive and captivating visitor experience.

“This major installation highlights one of Kusama’s most intense moments of innovation, in a pioneering six decades of artistic production that has traversed Conceptual art, Pop, Surrealism and Minimalism,” said Gavin Delahunty, the Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art. “The Infinity Mirror Rooms are key to understanding her practice, and as such we are delighted to welcome it to Dallas, joining several other major works by the artist in our community.”

Initiated by Delahunty, in close partnership with the Rachofskys, the acquisition of All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins is jointly owned by the DMA and the Rachofsky Collection.

READ MORE about the DMA’s new acquisition.

Dallas Museum of Art launches first major exhibition in the Museum’s history dedicated to time-based media

Dallas Museum of Art Presents

Truth: 24 frames per second

The Museum’s First Major Exhibition Dedicated to Time-Based Media

 24 Pioneers of Film and Video, Including
Dara Birnbaum, Morgan Fisher, Tatiana Gaviola, Arthur Jafa, Steve McQueen, Shirin Neshat, Pratibha Parmar, Rachel Rose, and Chick Strand

The US debut of John Gerrard’s Western Flag (Spindletop, Texas)
And the World Premiere of a Newly Restored Version of Bruce Conner’s REPORT That Examines the Assassination of John F. Kennedy in Dallas

On October 22, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) presents the first major exhibition in the Museum’s history dedicated to time-based media. Truth: 24 frames per second brings together 24 pioneers of film and video and over six decades of work focused on pressing contemporary themes, such as race relations, political unrest, sexual identity and the media, to explore the nature of truth and reality in contemporary life.

“The DMA’s time-based media collection is an incredibly rich and exciting resource for our understanding of contemporary life and important themes that are seen throughout the country today,” said Agustín Arteaga, the DMA’s Eugene McDermott Director. “We are pleased to bring these pioneering film and video works to our audiences as a way to learn about the development of this media over the past 50 years and the impact it has had on modern culture”

On view through January 28, 2018, Truth is curated by the DMA’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Gavin Delahunty with The Nancy and Tim Hanley Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art Anna Katherine Brodbeck, and is inspired by the DMA’s significant film and video holdings. The exhibition includes 10 works from the collection, many of which have never before been on view.

The era of post-truth politics poses particular questions for the medium of film, which, since its inception in the late 19th century, has been claimed to surpass all other forms of representation in duplicating reality. French film director Jean-Luc Godard’s well-known statement “[t]he cinema is truth 24 frames per second” posits that the moving image is particularly well placed to ethically and creatively capture “reality” on screen. Godard is not suggesting that filmic representations are unequivocally true, but that they can frame what remains of reality and as such effectively participate in a meaningful construction of it. These artists can draw our attention to marginalized or excluded societal positions, and challenge the powers that may be keeping them hidden or silenced. The exhibition is designed around three filmic techniques—appropriation, documentary and montage—that have been selected to confront the viewer with actual pieces of reality within a particular frame. These approaches have been chosen to create rich combinations, not as the neutral picturing of reality, but as a way of coming to terms with it.

READ MORE about this ground-breaking show.

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

 

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

 

We’ve had an exciting spring semester of workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. A diverse range of topics were presented including Ethiopian manuscript painting, museum exhibition design, and the impact of water mixable oils (WMOs) on current art conservation practice. The semester will conclude with two workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. On April 18 SMU Professor of Art Dr. Michael Corris will present his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art, “a compilation of insightful, first-hand accounts of art making, art criticism, and exhibition organizing from the early-1970s to the present.” EODIAH fellow and newly minted Ph.D. Dr. Joseph Hartman will present his research at our final workshop of the semester on April 25,Cuba Incarcerated: The Historic Vision of Cuban Prison Architecture. The Research Center continues to be a hive of scholarly activity and a space in which to display artworks.

Curated by our own Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, the third vitrine installation showcases beautiful lusterware ceramics from the Keir Collection. The collection of objects tells the story of the revolutionary technique of luster painting with examples from Iraq, Iran, and Egypt. Come by and view our ‘sneak peek’ of Islamic lusterware before the next installation of Keir objects at the DMA opens April 18 in the Focus I Gallery.

Be sure to visit the EODIAH Programs page on our website this summer to view our Fall 2017 events!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

DMA_Logo_Print_CMYK_2Color  

Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

Viva DMA

 

On March 12, a sweeping survey of painting, sculpture, photography, drawings, and films that document Mexico’s artistic Renaissance during the first half of the 20th century opened to the public. The much anticipated exhibition México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde brought in that day more than 2500 excited visitors eager to gaze at beloved masterworks and behold lesser-known pioneers of Mexican Modernism. In the days leading up to the opening, the Museum welcomed esteemed guests including Maria Cristina García Cepeda, the Minister of Culture of Mexico; Jorge Baldor, the founder of the Latino Center for Leadership Development in Dallas; and many Mexican art lenders to the exhibition’s DMA presentation. Accompanying the impressive exhibition is an equally beautiful illustrated catalogue coordinated by the DMA and the Secretaría de Cultura/Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes. It is edited by Dr. Agustín Arteaga, who has also written its lead essay, and available in both English and Spanish.

Ramón Cano Manilla Indian Woman from Oaxaca (India oaxaqueña), 1928 Oil on canvas Overall: 58.5 x 39 in. (149 x 99.5 cm) Museo Nacional de Arte, INBA, Mexico City Constituent holdings, 1982 © Courtesy of El Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes Y Literatura, 2017

Ramón Cano Manilla
Indian Woman from Oaxaca (India oaxaqueña), 1928
Oil on canvas
Overall: 58.5 x 39 in. (149 x 99.5 cm)
Museo Nacional de Arte, INBA, Mexico City Constituent holdings, 1982
© Courtesy of El Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes Y Literatura, 2017

 

Prime Real Estate

 

It took noted art collector Edmund de Unger over five decades to comprise one of the world’s most geographically and historically comprehensive collections of Islamic art. This April, the DMA will once again showcase these remarkable treasures, the largest public presentation in the Collection’s history, in a new long term installation. The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery will highlight particular strengths within the Collection, from luster pottery and rock crystals to rare manuscripts and painted miniatures of exquisite beauty. The gallery will be located at the very heart of the Museum, in the DMA’s concourse. “By situating the gallery of this important collection of masterworks in a prime location on the Museum’s first level, the DMA is affirming the vitality of Islamic art to its exhibition program and to the art historical canon,” said Sabiha Al Khemir, the DMA’s Senior Advisor for Islamic Art. The Keir Collection came to the DMA on a long-term loan agreement with the trustees of the Keir Collection that was finalized in 2014, transforming the Museum into the third largest repository of Islamic art in the US.

Khamsa of Nizami c. 1585–1590, Mughal Work on paper Overall: 2 3/4 × 5 3/8 × 7 7/8 in. (6.99 × 13.65 × 20 cm) The Keir Collection of Islamic Art on loan to the Dallas Museum of Art, K.1.2014.18

Khamsa of Nizami
c. 1585–1590, Mughal
Work on paper
Overall: 2 3/4 × 5 3/8 × 7 7/8 in. (6.99 × 13.65 × 20 cm)
The Keir Collection of Islamic Art on loan to the Dallas Museum of Art, K.1.2014.18

 

On View at The Dallas Museum of Art

México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

March 12-July 16, 2017

Tower Gallery and Chilton I

DMA Organized; U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Young Masters 2017

Through April 16, 2017

Concourse

 

The Keir Collection of Islamic Art Gallery

Opening April 18, 2017

Focus I Gallery

 

Daumier’s Political and Social Satire

Through April 23, 2017

Level 2

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion
May 21–August 20, 2017

Chilton II

 

Visions of America: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art
May 28–September 4, 2017

Chilton II

 

Waxed: Batik from Java

Through September 10, 2017

Level 3

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail

Through November 12, 2017

Focus II

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

Greetings from the Assistant Director

To launch the new year, on Saturday, January 13 the O’Donnell Institute partnered for the first time with the Crow Collection of Asian Art to present a symposium on the global histories of ceramics. Called Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas, the symposium brought together an all-star team of distinguished scholars to study and respond to the Crow’s stunning new exhibition Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles. The exhibition’s curator Farzaneh Pirouz was joined by Denise Leidy (Curator of Asian Art at Yale University Art Gallery), Guy Thomson (Professor Emeritus of Latin American History at University of Warwick), Jessica Hallet (Researcher in Art History at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Ronda Kasl (Curator of Latin American Art at the Metropolitan Museum), and William Sargent (Curator Emeritus of Asian Export Art at the Peabody Essex Museum) for three morning lectures held at the Dallas Museum of Art and an afternoon of gallery-based break-out sections at the Crow. Like the exhibition itself, presentations and conversations were truly global in scope, ranging from sixth-century China to ninth-century Basra to sixteenth-century Mexico to circa-1900 New York. Our own Sabiha Al Khemir presided over the morning session, and Rick Brettell and Crow curator Jacqueline Chao moderated a closing panel in the afternoon.

 

Participants in the Crow's international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections:  East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

Participants in the Crow’s international symposium “Talavera and Ceramic Connections: East Asia, West Asia, and the Americas”

 

By all accounts the symposium was a great success, and it’s precisely the kind of program that we are passionate about presenting: collaborative, object-led conversations with broad art historical implications. At the same time that speakers treated specific art historical questions like the origins of the use of cobalt blue in ceramics, the day raised larger questions with broad art historical significance: How is a complex technology transferred across space, time, and culture? How do objects made in one medium like clay dialogue with other mediums like glass and silver? How do local industries like that of Talavera in Puebla intersect with histories of class, race, and national politics? And how do our art histories of porcelain, for example, shape our practices of collecting—and vice versa? These and other questions that emerged from conversations and close looking will chart the course for future research.

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

Jar with Chinese double curved handles, Puebla de los Angeles, New Spain, 17th century, tin glaze earthenware with cobalt blue on white glaze, Museo Franz Mayer

 

If you were among the many friends and colleagues who joined us on Saturday, thank you for coming! If you were not able to attend, there is still time to see the exhibition before it closes in Dallas on February 12 and travels to Puebla, Mexico. It’s not to be missed!

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski

Assistant Director

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Reports from the Dallas Museum of Art

José Clemente Orozco The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926 Oil on canvas Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm) Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

José Clemente Orozco
The “Soldaderas” (Las soldaderas), 1926
Oil on canvas
Overall: 31 x 37.5 in. (81 x 95.5 cm)
Museo de Arte Moderno, INBA
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

 

México 1900–1950 Highlights New Narratives in Mexico’s Modern Art History

It’s a happy new year. This month the DMA issued its press release publicly announcing the exciting addition of México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde to the Museum’s exhibition schedule. The exhibition, curated by Dr. Agustín Arteaga, opened at the Grand Palais in Paris this past October, where it has received great public and critical acclaim. México 1900–1950 offers a renewed vision of Mexican art from the first half of the 20th century through a faithful account of the ambitious spirit of this major period of national artistic history. The impact of cultural activity in Mexico from the end of the long civil war (the Mexican revolt of 1910–20) until the beginning of the 1950s was indeed a singular phenomenon and can be seen in the works presented in México 1900–1950.
The exhibition, with the DMA serving as the only North American venue and the only venue outside of Paris, has already received tremendous support from the DMA community in the brief weeks since its inclusion in the DMA lineup of exhibitions this spring, and the DMA looks forward to inviting our community to discover more of the fabric of Mexico’s art history beginning March 12.

 

 

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Dr. Chu Comes to Dallas

On November 29, NEA Chairman Jane Chu visited Dallas as the featured speaker for the Dallas Arts District Community Breakfast. Afterwards, she visited the DMA with Gary Gibbs, Executive Director of the Texas Commission on the Arts, for a tour led by Agustín Arteaga of the Conservation Studio and the African and Contemporary Art galleries, with senior curators Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and Gavin Delahunty, The Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, offering commentary. Her visit ended with a presentation by Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education and Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences, and Ingrid Van Haastrecht, Director of Development Operations and Analysis, on the progress of the NEA grant the DMA received to conduct an evaluation of the South Dallas community and how they engage with the Museum. Dr. Chu’s visit was chronicled the following day in this article in the Dallas Morning News.

 

 

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Mark Leonard, Courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

After four and a half groundbreaking years at the DMA, Mark Leonard, the Museum’s first Chief Conservator, will be retiring—for the second time—to the sun-drenched California desert. Leonard stepped down in 2010 as the Head of the Paintings Conservation Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum to pursue his career as an artist. His DMA appointment in 2012 signaled the initial phase of the development of the Museum’s conservation program, which included the addition of staff and the renovation of its on-site spaces to include a paintings conservation studio.

While at the DMA, Leonard carefully stewarded the collection and built a robust and comprehensive conservation program. He was responsible for carrying out major treatments on over 60 works of art, restoring a range of works, from a rare early Renaissance Spanish panel painting, to Jacques Blanchard’s 17th-century oil painting Zeus and Semele, to a work by Texas artist Julian Onderdonk that had been confined to storage for decades because of its poor state of preservation. Leonard also collaborated with private collectors on the study and care of their collections in order to present the work in the Museum galleries for all to see.

Under Leonard’s direction, the DMA also established a network of regional conservation partnerships with museums in North Texas and local universities to collaborate on conservation research and the study of individual works. Although he will surely be missed, the impact of his time at the DMA will not soon be forgotten—and evidence of it will continue to be seen throughout our institution.

 

On View at The Dallas Museum of Art

DMA_Logo_Print_CMYK_2Color

On view at the DMA this Winter/Spring:

 

Nicolas Party: Pathway

Through February 5, 2017

Concourse

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

México 1900 – 1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

March 12-July 16, 2017

DMA Co-organized; U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Art and Nature in the Middle Ages

Through March 19, 2017

Chilton II

U.S. Exclusive Venue

 

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion
May 21–August 20, 2017

Chilton II

 

Visions of America: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art
May 28–September 4, 2017

Chilton II

 

Waxed: Batik from Java

Through September 10, 2017

Level 3

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA

 

Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail

Through November 12, 2017

Focus II

DMA Organized; Exclusively at the DMA