Tag: Fort Worth Modern

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

FOCUS: Dirk Braeckman

Jan 26, 2019 – Mar 17, 2019

The photographs of Ghent-based Dirk Braeckman (b. 1958, Eeklo, Belgium) have a distinct stillness and quietude that counter the whirl of today’s visual landscape. Images of empty, unidentifiable interiors, architectural details, oceans, and partially obscured nude figures are just some examples of the artist’s subject matter. Since the mid-1980s, Braeckman has tested the limits of photography, especially its materials and processes. Challenging the reproducibility of a photographic image, particularly in light of today’s vast dissemination of images, Braeckman creates unique prints using analogue processes and physically taxing experimental methods in the darkroom.

 

Disappearing—California, c. 1970:  Bas Jan Ader, Chris Burden, Jack Goldstein

May 10, 2019 – Aug 11, 2019

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the exhibition Disappearing-California, c. 1970: Bas Jan Ader, Chris Burden, Jack Goldstein. These three artists shared a common interest in themes of disappearance and self-effacement, which manifested in works that were daring and often dangerous. Responding to the social and political circumstances of their time and the nascent field of feminist art, the artists used “disappearing” as a response to the anxiety of the 1970s. This major exhibition, curated by Philipp Kaiser for the Modern, reveals a fascinating intersection between major figures at a critical turning point for Southern Californian art.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

Kamrooz Aram
Blue Backdrop for Minor Arts, 2018
Panel: oil an pencil on linen; Pedestal: oil on mdf, brass, terrazzo; ceramic
Overall: 50 1/4 × 9 × 9 in. Pedestal. Unframed: 48 × 66 × 2 in.Panel
Courtesy of the Artist and Green Art Gallery, Dubai
Image copyright: Photograph by Kevin Todora.

FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram

Mar 31, 2018 – Jun 17, 2018
Spanning painting, sculpture, collage, and installation, Kamrooz Aram’s work investigates the complex relationship between Western modernism and classical non-Western art. By highlighting their formal connections, he reveals the typically downplayed role that non-Western art and design have played in the development of modernism and its drive toward abstraction. Challenging the traditionally Euro-centric narrative established by art history, Aram’s work sets forth to disrupt this perceived hierarchy by merging and equalizing Western and non-Western forms. The artist will present all new work for this exhibition.

 More information on FOCUS

 

Takashi Murakami
Flower Ball (Lots of Colors), 2008
Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board
59 in. (150 cm) diameter
Cari and Michael J. Sacks © 2008 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Image copyright: Photo: Nathan Keay

TAKASHI MURAKAMI: THE OCTOPUS EATS ITS OWN LEG

Jun 10, 2018 – Sep 16, 2018

Known for his collaborations with pop icon Kanye West and fashion house Louis Vuitton, and for vibrant anime-inspired characters, Japanese artist Takashi Murakami (b. 1962) has blurred the boundaries throughout his career between high and low culture, ancient and modern, East and West. Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the exhibition is a major retrospective of his paintings, featuring fifty works that span three decades of his career, from the artist’s earliest mature works to his recent, monumentally scaled paintings. The exhibition, titled Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg, shows how Murakami’s art is rooted in traditions of Japanese painting and folklore, and highlights the artist’s careful attention to craft and materials. It also showcases the artist’s astute eye for the contemporary influences of globalization, media culture, the continued threats of nuclear power.

More information on the exhibition

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

Nina Chanel Abney, Hobson’s Choice, 2017
Acrylic and spray paint on canvas
Unframed: 84 1/4 × 120 1/4 × 2 inches
Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University; Museum purchase.

FOCUS: Nina Chanel Abney

January 27 – March 18

Nina Chanel Abney’s paintings are visually frenetic, reflecting the fast-paced energy of life today. Her imagery refers to such diverse subjects as pop culture, world events, and art history in compositions with flattened, simplified forms. Abney’s works commonly incorporate snippets of text, disembodied figures and silhouettes, and geometric abstract shapes. Themes that relate to American society, including celebrity culture, race, sexuality, and police brutality, are broached in her paintings. By touching on serious subjects in a colorful palette and graphic style, Abney’s work is, as the artist states, “easy to swallow, hard to digest.”

New Works by Ron Mueck

February 16 – May 6

In 2007, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth hosted Ron Mueck, featuring the artist’s figures that are extraordinarily realistic, except in scale-they are always depicted much smaller or larger than life. The exhibition broke attendance records for the Museum as Mueck’s stunning works became a must-see for visitors from across the region. Now a decade later, Ron Mueck returns to the Modern for a special project showcasing seven major works created between 2008 and 2018, including a new sculpture debuting in Fort Worth.

Ron Mueck, Woman with Shopping, 2013. Mixed media
113 x 49 x 34 cm / 44 1/2 x 19 1/4 x 13 3/8 inches
Photo: Patrick Gries. Copyright Ron Mueck.
Courtesy the artist, Anthony d’Offay, London and Hauser & Wirth

 

Kamrooz Aram, Ornamental Composition for Social Space 1, 2006

FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram

March 31 – June 17

Spanning painting, sculpture, collage, and installation, Kamrooz Aram’s work investigates the complex relationship between Western modernism and classical non-Western art. By highlighting their formal connections, he reveals the typically downplayed role that non-Western art and design have played in the development of modernism and its drive toward abstraction. Challenging the traditionally Euro-centric narrative established by art history, Aram’s work sets forth to disrupt this perceived hierarchy by merging and equalizing Western and non-Western forms. The artist will present all new work for this exhibition.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI: THE OCTOPUS EATS ITS OWN LEG

June 10 – September 16

Known for his collaborations with pop icon Kanye West and fashion house Louis Vuitton, and for vibrant anime-inspired characters, Japanese artist Takashi Murakami has blurred the boundaries throughout his career between high and low culture, ancient and modern, East and West. Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the exhibition is a major retrospective of his paintings, featuring fifty works that span three decades of his career, from the artist’s earliest mature works to his recent, monumentally scaled paintings.

The exhibition shows how Murakami’s art is rooted in traditions of Japanese painting and folklore, and highlights the artist’s careful attention to craft and materials. It also showcases the artist’s astute eye for the contemporary influences of globalization, media culture, the continued threats of nuclear power.

Takashi Murakami, Klein’s Pot A, 1994-97
Acrylic on canvas mounted on board in plexiglass box (optional)
15 3/8 x 15 3/8 x 3 3/8 inches
Colección Pérez Simón, Mexico
© 1994-97 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Photo: Yoshitaka Uchida

 

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

Misty Keasler, Blackthorne Manor, Terror on the Fox, Green Bay, WI, 2016

Misty Keasler: Haunt

Sep 23, 2017 – Nov 26, 2017

Thirteen themed haunted houses across America make up the imagery for Misty Keasler’s Haunt, 2015–2017. A driving force behind this series, which depicts interior rooms and exterior scenes, is that the subject matter takes photography to the edge of where it fails as a medium.  “Photographs,” Keasler explains, “are often used to document an experience, yet the experience of walking through a haunted house is completely lost in each of the still images. Also, the houses use sound, including fear frequencies, to unnerve you at a biological level; darkening effects, like lighting a house almost entirely with flashes of lightning; smells, like the very distinct smell of death, or cheap perfume—and these sensory components are missing. The tension in knowing any number of characters are waiting in the dark to jump out at you is lost in these images as well—the immersive experience just does not translate.” Where photography fails, however, is the point at which Haunt, detailing the various Baroque themes of the houses, creates another type of tension.  It allows lingering looks—something that is not possible at actual haunts where visitors are shuttled through on a forced and darkened path—and, the more we look, the more terrifying the scenes become.

Approximately 40 photographs (out of 104) that feature American haunted houses are included in this exhibition. These photographs are unpopulated, apart from a few gory figurative props such as severed heads, monsters, and dead bodies. Without people, the rooms themselves, in their display of psycho-narratives, become captivating portraits of persona. Who would put these rooms together this way? Who makes up the market for such places, paying to be scared? And what does this say about American culture?

Of this exhibition, senior curator Andrea Karnes says, “The imagery in Haunt is both beautiful and horrific, but moreover, the series magnifies the strangeness of the existence of such places, where fantasies are manifested. People desire, and will pay for, the sensation of fear, and that is a surprising and provocative revelation that comes out in these works.”

In addition to the photographs of haunts, this exhibition includes a separate series of approximately 15 portraits (out of 40) of haunted house actors in monster costumes.

Misty Keasler’s work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Dallas Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts in Japan, and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. She holds an undergraduate degree from Columbia College and an MFA from Bard College. She lives and works in Dallas, Texas.

 

 

Katherine Bradford, Surfer, 2015, acrylic on canvas, 72 x 55 inches

FOCUS: Katherine Bradford

Nov 04, 2017 – Jan 14, 2018

Katherine Bradford is known for her vibrant palette, faux-naïf style, and eccentric compositions. Often built up over months and sometimes years, Bradford’s paintings are textured, semi-transparent coats of acrylic paint, with hints of pentimenti exposed in the finished surface. Her recent works revisit several of her favored motifs, such as ships and swimmers—traditional and enduring subjects seen throughout art history. Bradford’s canvases, however, are more ominous, and often improbable in comparison to the relative calm of James McNeill Whistler’s paintings or Paul Cézanne’s portraits of bathers. In her works, ocean liners collapse in the night sea, beachgoers and swimmers populate fearsome expanses such as ebbing waters and outer space, and sea monsters, as in Large Ocean Painting, 2016, rear their heads above a crowded ocean. Bradford’s work suggests humanity humbled by the vastness of nature.

While simple in form, her ongoing series of nocturnal paintings exhibits a range of colors, such as orange, neon green, and pink-violet, that glow and illuminate the otherwise dark scenes. In Pond Swimmers, 2016, the only source of light is emanating from the swimmers’ orange-pink skin. Two figures in the work are set within a dense blue-purple pond, while one man in the foreground lies on a sliver of beach under the night sky. As with most of her paintings, the subjects in Pond Swimmers are pared down, fragmented, and faceless, which suggests the anonymous everyman. FOCUS: Katherine Bradford is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Texas and features new and recent paintings.

Katherine Bradford was born in New York City and is currently based in Brooklyn. She received a BA from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and an MFA from the State University of New York at Purchase. Bradford has been included in important group exhibitions both nationally and internationally, at such venues as MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York; Yale School of Art, New Haven; and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia. Her work is in several public collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Brooklyn Museum; Portland Museum of Art, Maine; Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; and Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions

SunRa 2016 Stanley Whitney SunRa 2016, 2016 Oil on linen 96 x 96 inches Courtesy of team gallery

SunRa 2016
Stanley Whitney
SunRa 2016, 2016
Oil on linen
96 x 96 inches
Courtesy of team gallery

 

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents FOCUS: Stanley Whitney

January 21-April 2, 2017

The FOCUS series is organized by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth for the Director’s Council, a group that supports acquisitions at the Museum. The series features three solo exhibitions annually, organized by Assistant Curator Alison Hearst.

Since the mid-1970s, Stanley Whitney has investigated the intricate possibilities of color and form in the realm of abstract painting. Whitney’s signature style features multicolored, irregular grids on square canvases. Taking the essentialist grid of minimalism as his cue, his configurations are loose, uneven geometric lattices comprised of vibrant stacked color blocks that vary in hue, shape, and the handling of the paint. Whitney also utilizes color as subject, and his paintings often refer to literature, music, places, and other artists, connections that are bolstered in his titles.

Working without preparatory materials, Whitney combines balance and intuition in his approach to painting, as each color block is painted sequentially in relation to the ongoing arrangement. This process is expressive, improvisational, and can be linked to jazz, which continually inspires the artist. As Whitney has stated, “The way that it’s a little offbeat, polyrhythmic; the way that things move. Nothing’s straight. Nothing’s regular. Everything’s a little crooked. And I think that’s really what comes out of the music. It comes out of the beat, it comes out of how people walk, the way people wear their hat, just a little off. I think about all of those kinds of things and want them in the painting.”

FOCUS: Stanley Whitney features new work by the artist, including three large-scale paintings.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

 

Firemen March 6 1985 Donald Sultan Firemen March 6 1985, 1985 Latex and tar on tile over Masonite 96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Firemen March 6 1985
Donald Sultan
Firemen March 6 1985, 1985
Latex and tar on tile over Masonite
96 1/2 x 96 1/2 inches
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, 1985

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings

February 19–April 23, 2017

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth presents the first exhibition focusing on Donald Sultan’s seminal Disaster Paintings series, including eleven signature paintings from 1984 to 1990. Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings is organized by the Modern’s assistant curator, Alison Hearst. The exhibition will be on view at the Lowe Art Museum, Miami, September 29–December 23, 2016; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, February 19–April 23, 2017; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, May 26–September 4, 2017; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, September 23–December 31, 2017; and Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, January 24–May 13, 2018.

Artist Donald Sultan’s career began with his first solo exhibition in 1977 in New York City, when he was just 26 years old, and he rose to prominence in the 1980s. A painter, sculptor, and printmaker, Sultan is regarded for his ongoing large-scale painted still lifes featuring structural renderings of fruit, flowers, and other everyday objects, often abstracted and set against a rich, black background; but he is also noted for his significant industrial landscape series that began in the early 1980s entitled the Disaster Paintings, on which the artist worked for nearly a decade. While Sultan’s still lifes depict and strengthen fragile and ephemeral objects, the Disaster Paintings often illustrate robust, man-made structures, such as factories and train cars, that exhibit a level of fragility in their propensity to be unhinged by catastrophic events. Distinguished for combining such subject matter with industrial materials, such as tar and Masonite tiles, the Disaster Paintings exemplify in both media and concept the vulnerability of the most progressive manufactured elements of modern culture.

Read more at The Modern’s website.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Exhibitions and Events

Exhibitions

 

KAWS WHERE THE END STARTS

Oct 20, 2016 – Jan 22, 2017

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KAWS, CHUM (KCA6), CHUM (KCC3), CHUM (KCB4)KAWS CHUM (KCA6), CHUM (KCC3), CHUM (KCB4), 2012 Acrylic on canvas over panel 84 x 68 x 1 3/4 in. Private Collection Image copyright: Rights & Reproductions

KAWS, CHUM (KCA6), CHUM (KCC3), CHUM (KCB4)KAWS
CHUM (KCA6), CHUM (KCC3), CHUM (KCB4), 2012
Acrylic on canvas over panel, 84 x 68 x 1 3/4 in.
Private Collection.  Image copyright: Rights & Reproductions

 

FOCUS: Lorna Simpson

Nov 19, 2016 – Jan 15, 2017

Since the beginning of her career in the mid-1980s, Lorna Simpson has been well known for her conceptual photographs and videos that challenge historical and preconceived views of racial and sexual identity. FOCUS: Lorna Simpson will be the first museum exhibition to feature the artist’s large-scale acrylic, ink, and silkscreened paintings.

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FOCUS: Stanley Whitney

Jan 21, 2017 – Apr 02, 2017

Stanley Whitney investigates the intricate possibilities of color and form in the realm of abstract painting. Since the mid-1970s, Whitney has been known for his multicolored, irregular grids on square canvases. Taking the essentialist grid of minimalism as his cue, his configurations are loose, uneven geometric lattices comprised of vibrant stacked color blocks that vary in hue, shape, and the handling of the paint. Whitney also utilizes color as subject, and his paintings often refer to literature, music, places, and other artists, connections that are bolstered in his titles.

MORE

 

Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings

Feb 19, 2017 – Apr 23, 2017

Artist Donald Sultan’s career began with his first solo exhibition in 1977 in New York City, when he was just 26 years old, and he rose to prominence in the 1980s. A painter, sculptor, and printmaker, Sultan is regarded for his ongoing large-scale painted still lifes featuring structural renderings of fruit, flowers, and other everyday objects, often abstracted and set against a rich, black background; but he is also noted for his significant industrial landscape series that began in the early 1980s entitled the Disaster Paintings, on which the artist worked for nearly a decade.

MORE

 

Lectures

 

Modern Connections Conversation Presents Stephen Lapthisophon

Modern Connections

November 10, 2016 – 7:00pm

 

Lorna Simpson

Tuesday Evenings at the Modern

November 15, 2016 – 7:00pm

 

Special Lecture with Artist KAWS

November 30, 2016 – 7:00pm