Tag: Joseph R. Hartman

Joseph R. Hartman Joins University of Missouri as Assistant Professor this Fall

Joseph R. Hartman, EODIAH fellow 2016-2017, will be joining the University of Missouri – Kansas City (UMKC) as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies and Art History this Fall. Hartman will work with a team of distinguished scholars in both fields, contributing to the growth of the Latina/o Studies and Art History programs at UMKC through community outreach with the Latinx community and collaborations with the Nelson-Atkins Museum and other centers for Latinx advocacy in Kansas City. In addition to teaching, Hartman will continue research on Cuba, U.S. Imperialism, and the aftereffect of U.S. interventions in Latin America among immigrant communities today. In a crowded and competitive job market, Hartman feels very fortunate to be given this opportunity; and he is especially grateful to colleagues and mentors at EODIAH, SMU, UNT, and the wider community of art historians in North Texas that have made this possible.

Joseph R. Hartman, EODIAH Research Fellow

Joseph Hartman

Joseph Hartman

EODIAH Research Fellow Joseph R. Hartman received his PhD in Art History from Southern Methodist University December 17, 2016. After graduation, Hartman traveled to Cuba to meet with professionals and to document monuments in Havana, Santa Clara, and Trinidad for his current book manuscript The Dictator’s Dreamscape: Building Machado’s Cuba. The book examines the public works program of U.S.-backed Dictator Gerardo Machado (in power 1925-1933). It reconsiders Cuban art, architecture, and visual culture within broader histories of nation building, globalization, and the rise of U.S. hegemony in the Western hemisphere during the twentieth century. With generous financial and scholarly support from the Edith O’Donnell Institute, Hartman will complete the book manuscript in the coming spring.

Joseph R. Hartman, EODIAH Research Fellow

EODIAH Research Fellow Joseph R. Hartman was funded by the Santander Bank and the Meadows School of Arts to present at “Arte, Arquitectura, y Política en América Latina,” a conference held at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Perú in Lima, Perú (September 28-30). Presented in Spanish, his talk considered the visual history of the Isle of Pines, a small island off Cuba’s southern coast once occupied by pirates, U.S. entrepreneurs, and then a maximum security penitentiary run by the Cuban State. The program was part of an academic exchange between doctoral colleagues in Perú and Texas. Spearheaded by SMU Chair and Professor of Art History, Adam Herring, activities outside the conference included a visit to Cuzco, the Nazca Lines, and Machu Picchu, one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

October 13-16, Hartman co-organized the panel “Looking and Working in the Spanish Caribbean City,” with his colleagues Paul Niell and Asiel Sepúlveda, for the Eighth Biennial Urban History Association Conference held at Loyola University in Chicago, IL. Hartman presented his work “Testimonies in Stone and Light: Photography, Urbanization, and Labor in Modern Cuba.” His talk considered Depression-era narratives of industrial positivism in photographs of “men at work” in Havana produced by U.S. photographer Walker Evans and the Cuban State.

These talks came out of Hartman’s dissertation, entitled Modern Dreams: Building Machado’s Cuba, 1925-1933. Hartman’s doctoral work focuses on the U.S.-funded public works campaign of the Cuban Dictator Gerardo Machado. Hartman will submit his dissertation for the fulfillment of his PhD in Art History at SMU this December. He will then return to Cuba with his family on a brief research trip for his book project on state-sponsored Cuban art and architecture.