Tag: Kimbell Art Museum

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibition and Lectures

Balenciaga. Veste et robe. Ensemble (habillement). Cloqué matelassé lamé Lurex, doublure en crêpe de Chine. 1968. Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris.

Exhibitions

BALENCIAGA IN BLACK

October 7, 2018 to January 6, 2019

Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) is often called “the couturier’s couturier”—the fashion designer revered by all other fashion designers. From his first runway collection, in 1937, through the closure of his Paris salon, in 1968, Balenciaga’s clients were among the most influential trendsetters of the day. This autumn, the Kimbell Art Museum will partner with the Palais Galliera, the distinguished fashion museum of the city of Paris, to present Balenciaga in Black, an exhibition of more than one hundred pieces from the collections of the Galliera and the archives of the Maison Balenciaga.

The carefully selected costumes and accessories, all made by hand in the haute-couture ateliers of this fashion genius, share one major feature: they are all black. For Balenciaga, black was vibrant, capable of exhibiting a dazzling interplay of light through luxurious fabrics and materials. This exhibition reveals the masterful shapes created by the artist with apparently simple cuts and impeccably composed adornments of lace, embroidery, silk, fringes, beads, and sequins. These expertly executed, timeless silhouettes continue to inspire modern fashion.

This exhibition is organized by the Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Paris Musées.

 

GOYA IN BLACK AND WHITE

October 7, 2018 to January 6, 2019

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes is among the best-known figures in the history of Spanish art and renowned as one of the greatest painters of all time. He is also revered as one of history’s greatest draftsmen and printmakers. This exhibition will showcase more than seventy-five of his paramount works on paper from the unparalleled collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Goya in Black and White will explore the evolution of the artist’s graphic work in all media. The importance of black and white will be shown throughout the exhibition—not only literally, in black ink on white paper, but also figuratively, as in the oppositions of night and day, the balance between menacing shadow and hopeful light, that pervade the artist’s imagination. In the Kimbell’s exhibition, Goya’s principal series and best-known compositions, including the Caprichos series, The Sleep of Reason Produces MonstersDisasters of WarDisparates, and Tauromaquia, will be represented in detail, some works in multiple impressions, to show the creative evolution of the artistic process of a genius.

This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

 

Lectures & Discussions

Year-round evening, weekday, and Saturday lectures by Museum staff and guest speakers explore various topics relating to the permanent collection and special exhibitions on view at the Kimbell Art Museum.

CART captioning for public lectures and special exhibition symposia is available by request with at least three weeks advance notice. E-mail education@kimbellmuseum.org or call 817-332-8451, ext. 713, to place a request.

Some programs require advance reservations.

 

Friday Evening Lectures

SELECTED FRIDAYS, 6 PM

Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held throughout the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art.

Free; no registration required. Seating is limited. Pavilion Auditorium; simulcast in Kahn Auditorium.

Guillaume Kientz, curator, department of paintings, Musée du Louvre, Paris
Friday, October 12, 2018 – 6:00 PM
Hamish Bowles, European editor-at-large, Vogue, New York

Friday, October 26, 2018 – 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Thomas E. Rassieur, John E. Andrus III Curator of Prints and Drawings, The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis

Friday, November 2, 2018 –6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Valerie Steele, director and chief curator, The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, New York

Friday, December 7, 2018 – 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Wednesday Series: Art in Context Lectures

SELECTED WEDNESDAYS, 12:30 PM

These lectures, part of a continuing series, introduce the permanent collection and selected exhibitions on view at the Kimbell Art Museum.

Free; no reservations required. Seating is limited.

Piano Auditorium

Scott Winterrowd, director of education, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University, Dallas

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Tara Zanardi, associate professor, art history, Hunter College, City University of New York

Wednesday, November 7, 2018 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Rafael Barrientos Martinez, PhD student, University of California, Los Angeles

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 – 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

 

The Artist’s Eye

SELECTED SATURDAYS, 11 AM

What does the art of the past mean to the artist of the present? In this ongoing program, moderated by Kimbell staff, artists and architects discuss works in the Museum’s collection, share the special insights of the practicing professional, and relate older art to contemporary artistic concerns, including their own.

Free; no reservations required.  Seating is limited.

Kahn Building galleries

Moderated by Eric M. Lee, director

Saturday, October 20, 2018 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Moderated by George T. M. Shackelford, deputy director

Saturday, December 1, 2018 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Moderated by Claire Barry, director of conservation

Saturday, January 12, 2019 – 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Symposia & Inaugural Lectures

Inaugural lectures, panel discussions, and daylong symposia featuring leading experts from all over the world launch the opening of the Museum’s special exhibitions.

Free; seating is limited. No reservations required. Priority admission reserved for Kimbell members who present a current membership card at least twenty minutes before the program begins.

Piano Auditorium

Saturday, October 6, 2018 – 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Saturday, February 9, 2019 – 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

State of the Arts

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 6 pm

Trailblazers: Fort Worth’s Emerging Creative Class

Fort Worth is now the youngest city in the state of Texas—and you can feel a buzz all over the place. A new generation is reinventing neighborhoods with repurposed venues and innovative approaches to everything from retail design, film, public art, cuisine, and even curated events. Meet some of the trailblazers who are embracing our city’s traditions—its world-class arts organizations and unique western heritage—but adding their own spin, and, along the way, reshaping our ideas about culture. After the discussion, continue the conversation at a reception in the Pavilion Lobby presented by Visit Fort Worth.

Susan Gruppi and Jessica Miller, M2G Ventures

Jonathan Morris, Fort Worth Barber Shop

Red Sanders, Red Productions

Noel and Sara Viramontes, Blackhouse

 

ARTMinded Podcast

Art Minded Podcast logo from the iTunes Store

The Kimbell Art Museum presents “ARTMinded,” a free podcast produced by the Museum that offers new perspectives on the works in the Museum’s permanent collection and special exhibitions. Each episode will provide unusual viewpoints that enhance and sometimes even challenge customary engagement with artworks.

The inaugural season of “ARTMinded” begins with a series of guided meditations produced in collaboration with Elemental Yoga and the Mind Arts. Designed to be enjoyed by meditation experts and novices alike, each fifteen-minute guided meditation focuses on a work of art in the special exhibition From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection. Buddhist icons and Tibetan mandalas come alive before the viewer as Elemental Yoga takes the listener on a journey to deep, mindful relaxation with illustrative visualizations and breathing techniques.

Please click on the links below to download the podcast:
Apple Store
Google Play

 

Artful Readings

SELECTED FRIDAY EVENINGS, 5:30–7 PM

Participants explore connections in the literary and visual arts through group discussions and special presentations on selected books. Includes wine and light refreshments, as well as a 20% discount on Artful Readings selections in the Museum Shop.

To register or to be placed on a waitlist, please call 817-332-8451, ext. 351, or email edassist@kimbellmuseum.org. Pricing information is listed below.

  • Single session for nonmembers: $20
  • Single session for members: $16
  • Series of three for nonmembers: $50
  • Series of three for members: $40

Artful Reading programs

 

View the full listing of the Kimbell’s upcoming Lectures & Discussions

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Exhibitions

 

From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection
MARCH 4–AUGUST 19, 2018

When Sam Myers was sent to Paris by his law firm in the mid-1960s, he and his wife Myrna became so enamored with the city that they decided to make it their home. There, over the course of 50 years, they built an extraordinary collection that until now has never been exhibited publicly in the United States. Beginning by acquiring Greek and Roman antiquities but eventually focusing on Asia, the Myers assembled some 5,000 works that offer a very personal vision of the world of Asian art. This exhibition will present over 400 objects selected from this remarkable collection, with works representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam.

The exhibition covers a broad historical range, from the Neolithic era to the 20th century. The objects are also highly varied in nature, from porcelain, ivory, and precious stones such as jade and rock crystal to Buddhist art and textiles and stunning costumes from Central Asia, Tibet, China and Japan. Each treasure is exceptional in its shape, rarity, quality, function or inherent message. The exhibition recounts fascinating historical events through themes such as the symbolism of Chinese jade, the trade in blue-and-white porcelain, Buddhism, Noh theater, the Japanese samurai, the tea ceremony, the art of writing and the place of women. The astonishing array of outstanding works of art in the Myers collection is testimony to Asia’s rich cultural heritage and unique customs and offers a broad panorama of Asian history in all its beauty and diversity.

This exhibition is produced by Pointe-à-Callière, Montréal Archaeology and History Complex, Montréal, Canada, in partnership with Sam Myers.

 

Lectures

 

Friday Evening Lectures

SELECTED FRIDAYS, 6 pm

Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held thorought the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art.  Free; no reservations required. Seating is limited.Pavillion Auditorium.

 

Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond

MAY 11

Lee Talbot, curator, Eastern Hemisphere Collections, The George Washington University and The Textile Museum, Washington, DC.

 

From Workshop to Grave: Ancient Chinese Jades

Friday, July 13, 2018 – 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

J. Keith Wilson, curator of ancient Chinese art, Freer/Sackler, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

 

 

Education Events and Activities

 

Family Festival: Passport to Asia / Pasaporte a Asia

Sunday, June 3, 2018 – 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

 

Film Series

SELECTED SUNDAYS, 2 pm

Comprehensive film programs focusing on artists’ careers, major art movements, and important cultural figures provide rich visual and historical context that complement artworks on view.Kahn Auditorium

High Art of the Low Countries

May 27, June 24, July 1

In this sweeping production, British art historian and broadcaster Andrew Graham-Dixon explores the art of the Low Countries. Examining the formation of a ground-breaking school of painting by artists such as Jan van Eyck and Hieronymus Bosch, Graham-Dixon then turns to the prosperous Dutch Golden Age of the seventeenth century that fostered the careers of Rembrandt van Rijn, Johannes Vermeer, and others. In the modern age, the Low Countries once again produced important forward-thinking artists, including Vincent van Gogh and Piet Mondrian.

 

The Art of Japanese Life & Handmade in Japan

July 8, July 15, July 22, July 29

Explore the vibrant art and culture of Japan in two recent series from the BBC. In The Art of Japanese Life, Dr. James Fox examines how three core themes—nature, the city, and the home— have manifested in Japanese art and life through the centuries. Handmade in Japan follows contemporary artisans’ intricate production of traditional Japanese crafts: the Samurai sword, the kimono, and Mingei pottery. Offered in conjunction with the special exhibition From the Lands of Asia.

 

 

 

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

 

Exhibition

From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection

March 4, 2018 to August 19, 2018

When Americans Samuel and Myrna Myers visited Paris in the mid-1960s, they became so enamored with the city that they decided to make their home there. This was where they built an extraordinary collection that until now has never be exhibited publicly. Over the course of more than 40 years, the Myers assembled some 5,000 works of art that, together, offer a very personal vision of the world of Asian art. This exhibition will present over 400 objects selected from this remarkable collection, with works representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam.

 

Symposium and Lectures

 

Symposium

From the Lands of Asia: The Sam and Myrna Myers Collection

SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 10 am–1 pm

 

A Quest for Asian Art: The Spirit of the Myers Collection, Jean-Paul Desroches, senior curator of the French National Patrimony

Radiant Stones: The Importance of Jade in Chinese Culture, Filippo Salviati, professor, department of Oriental studies, “La Sapienza” University, Rome

Chinese Silk: Conspicuous Consumption and Lucrative Trade, John E. Vollmer, independent scholar, New York

Stories for My Children and Grandchildren: A Conversation with Sam MyersModerated by Jean-Paul Desroches and Jennifer Casler Price

 

Wednesday Series: Art in Context

APRIL 4, 12:30 pm

Art and Diplomacy: The Sculptural Brilliance of Ancient Ife

Suzanne Preston Blier, Allen Whitehill Clowes Chair of Fine Arts and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Friday Evening Lecture

APRIL 6, 6 pm

Transcendent Specifics: Buddhist Arts of Tibet, Japan, Korea, and China

Katherine Anne Paul, curator, arts of Asia, Newark Museum, New Jersey

 

The Artist’s Eye

April 21, 11 am   Swang Lin, associate concertmaster, Ann Koonsman Chair, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

 

Wednesday Series: Art in Context

APRIL 25, 12:30 pm

Journey to Peru: The Wari, the Inca, and the Road to Machu Picchu

Jennifer Casler Price, curator for Asian and non-Western art, Kimbell Art Museum

 

Wednesday Series: Art in Context

MAy 9, 12:30 pm

Delacroix: Taking a Close Look

Peter Van de Moortel, assistant conservator of paintings, Kimbell Art Museum

 

Friday Evening Lecture

MAY 11, 6 pm

Shimmering Splendor, Woven Wealth: Silk in Imperial China and Beyond

Lee Talbot, curator, Eastern Hemisphere Collections, The George Washington University and The Textile Museum, Washington, DC

 

The Artist’s Eye

MAY 19, 11 am   Albert S. Komatsu, architect, Fort Worth

 

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Jean-Honoré Fragonard
French, 1732–1806
The See-Saw
c. 1750–52
Oil on Canvas
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

 

 

Casanova: The Seduction of Europe

August 27, 2017 to December 31, 2017

Louis I. Kahn Building

Casanova: The Seduction of Europe explores the 18th century across Europe through the eyes of one of its most colorful characters, Giacomo Casanova (1725–1798). Renowned in modern times for his amorous pursuits, Casanova lived not only in Italy, but in France and England, and his travels took him to the Ottoman Empire and to meet Catherine the Great in Saint Petersburg. Bringing together paintings, sculpture, works on paper, furnishings, porcelains, silver and period costume, Casanova will bring this world to life.

 

Lectures

OCTOBER 13, 6 pm (Friday Evening Lecture Series)

Oysters and Champagne: Dining with Casanova

Meredith Chilton, chief curator, Gardiner Museum, Toronto

 

 

OCTOBER 18, 12:30 pm (Wednesday Series: Art in Context)

Painted Ladies in Casanova’s Time

Jessica L. Fripp, assistant professor of art history, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth

 

 

OCTOBER 28, SATURDAY, 11 am (The Artist’s Eye Series)

The Artist’s Eye

Joseph Havel, Houston

 

 

NOVEMBER 10, 6 pm (Friday Evening Lecture Series)

Casanova and the Theater of the World

Ian Kelly, historian, writer, and actor, London, United Kingdom

 

 

NOVEMBER 15, 12:30 pm (Wednesday Series: Art in Context)

Ballet, Body Language, and Casanova

Catherine Turocy, choreographer, dance historian, and director, New York Baroque Dance Co., Dallas and New York

 

 

DECEMBER 8, 6 pm (Friday Evening Lecture Series)

Casanova in Hogarth’s London

Duncan Robinson, director emeritus of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, United Kingdom, and former director of the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut

 

 

DECEMBER 9, SATURDAY, 11 am (The Artist’s Eye Series)

The Artist’s Eye

Etty Horowitz, Fort Worth

Kimbell Art Museum Presents Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

Kahn at the Kimbell

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; constructed 1969–72 North portico with reflecting pool Louis I. Kahn (1901–1974), architect Photograph: Robert LaPrelle © 2013 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth

THE KIMBELL’S ARCHITECT COMES TO LIFE IN AN IN-DEPTH EXHIBITON

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

March 26–June 25, 2017
On view in the Louis Kahn Building

 

Louis I. Kahn (American, 1901–1974), architect of the Kimbell Art Museum, is regarded as one of the great master builders of the twentieth century. With complex spatial compositions and a choreographic mastery of light, Kahn created buildings of archaic beauty and powerful universal symbolism. In addition to the Kimbell (1966–72), his most important works include the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959–65), and the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh (1962–83). The exhibition Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, organized by Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), is the first major retrospective of Kahn’s work in two decades.

In addition to The Power of Architecture, the Kimbell Art Musuem is the sole venue for a complementary exhibition, The Color of Light, The Treasury of Shadows: Pastels by Louis I. Kahn from the Collections of His Children. Admission to both special exhibitions is free.

“The Kimbell’s Kahn-designed building is acknowledged the world over as an architectural masterpiece,” commented Eric M. Lee, director of the Kimbell Art Museum. “Visitors who come to this exhibition will get know Kahn, the architect, and follow him on the thrilling journey that led to the vision for the Kimbell Art Museum.”

The exhibition encompasses an unprecedented and diverse range of architectural models, original drawings, photographs and films. All of Kahn’s important projects are extensively documented—from his early urban planning concepts and single-family houses to monumental late works such as the Roosevelt Memorial in New York City (1973/74), posthumously completed in October 2012. The view of Kahn’s architectural oeuvre is augmented by a selection of watercolors, pastels and charcoal drawings created during his travels, which document his skill as an artist and illustrator. Highlights of the exhibition include a 12-foot-high model of the spectacular City Tower designed for Philadelphia (1952–57), as well as previously unpublished film footage shot by Nathanial Kahn, the son of Louis Kahn and director of the film My Architect. Interviews with architects such as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Peter Zumthor and Sou Fujimoto underscore the current significance of Kahn’s work, which is being rediscovered and made accessible to a wide public audience with this exhibition.

A biographical introduction to the exhibition is followed by six thematic sections that illustrate the development of Kahn’s work over time and explore Kahn’s quest for origins: in architecture and art, in the natural sciences, and in the observation of human behavior and society. The first section of the exhibition, entitled City, examines the architect’s relationship to Philadelphia—his adopted home after immigrating to the United States—which became a laboratory for the development of his own urbanistic and architectural principles. Science demonstrates how Kahn studied the structural laws inherent in nature as a means of establishing a foundation for the renewal of architecture. Landscape emphasizes that nature was not only a source of inspiration for Kahn but also increasingly important as a context for his buildings. House illustrates that Kahn’s desire to create a stronger connection between architecture and the surrounding environment also formed the basis of his residential designs; he regarded the house as an archetype and starting point for his understanding of architecture and community. Kahn’s increasing success was accompanied by the evolution of an architecture that was closely linked to the timeless foundations of traditional building, yet radically innovative and future-oriented in terms of technology and construction. The underlying ideal of an Eternal Present resulted from Kahn’s intense engagement with architectural history and archetypical structures, vividly documented in his travel drawings from Italy, Greece and Egypt. The culmination of the exhibition is represented by the section Community, which expresses how essential the social significance of architecture was to Kahn and how he derived new forms for public buildings from it. Taken as a whole, the six themes of the exhibition reveal a new view of Louis Kahn’s oeuvre that defies the common classifications of modernism or postmodernism.

Kahn’s uniqueness lies in his synthesis of the major conceptual traditions of modern architecture—from the École des Beaux-Arts and the constructive rationalism of the 19th century to the Arts and Crafts movement and Bauhaus modernism—enhanced by the consideration of indigenous, non-Western building traditions. Kahn gained important impulses from architectural movements such as metabolism and brutalism. He anticipated aspects of building that are highly relevant today, including a return to local resources and “soft” factors such as air, light and water. He saw himself as part of a tradition that spanned thousands of years and that understood architecture not only as a means of satisfying utilitarian needs, but as an instrument of artistic speculation and a vehicle for contemplating nature, history and human community.

Convinced that contemporary architects could—and should—produce buildings that were as monumental and as spiritually inspiring as the ancient ruins of Greece and Egypt, Kahn devoted his career to the uncompromising pursuit of formal perfection and emotional expression. Working with simple materials, notably brick and concrete, Kahn applied his principles to create buildings instilled with the spiritual qualities he desired through a masterful sense of space and light. He employed this approach to create his first masterpiece, the Salk Institute (1959–65). Kahn’s interest in the relationship of architecture to its location and landscape is one of the most magical elements of the Salk Institute, an extraordinarily inspiring sequence of buildings perched on a cliff above the Pacific Ocean. This interest was equally important to his campus buildings at Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania (1960–65), the Exeter Library, New Hampshire (1967–72), and the Yale Center for British Art (1968–74). Striving for perfection, Kahn’s development during this period culminated in another masterpiece, the Kimbell Art Museum, which is still regarded as an exceptionally compelling and empathetic environment for displaying painting and sculpture.

The exhibition is organized by Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. It is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional sponsorship support is provided by The Beck Group. Promotional support is provided by the American Airlines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and NBC5.

Complementary Exhibition

The Color of Light, The Treasury of Shadows:
Pastels by Louis I. Kahn from the Collections of His Children

This intimate exhibition presents a selection of pastels dating from a three-month period in 1950–51 when Kahn was Architect in Residence at the American Academy in Rome. While there, he had the opportunity to travel and sketch the great historic monuments and public spaces of Italy, Greece and Egypt. Away from the daily concerns of his architectural practice, his eye and spirit were free to absorb the essence of these places. In pastels that have been acknowledged as the most sublime examples of his drawing, he captured the vivid colors that light and shadow make as they illuminate the ancient sites.

Special thanks to the children of Louis I. Kahn, Sue Ann Kahn, Alexandra Tyng and Nathaniel Kahn, for generously lending their works for this exhibition.

Kimbell Art Museum

The Kimbell Art Museum, owned and operated by the Kimbell Art Foundation, is internationally renowned for both its collections and for its architecture. The Kimbell’s collections range in period from antiquity to the 20th century and include European masterpieces by artists such as Fra Angelico, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Poussin, Velázquez, Monet, Picasso and Matisse; important collections of Egyptian and classical antiquities; and the art of Asia, Africa and the Ancient Americas.

The exhibition is organized by Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. It is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional sponsorship support is provided by The Beck Group. Promotional support is provided by the American Airlines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and NBC5.

The Museum’s 1972 building, designed by the American architect Louis I. Kahn, is widely regarded as one of the outstanding architectural achievements of the modern era. A second building, designed by world-renowned Italian architect Renzo Piano, opened in 2013 and now provides space for special exhibitions, dedicated classrooms and a 289-seat auditorium with excellent acoustics for music.

*Admission to Louis Kahn. The Power of Architecture is FREE **Admission is always FREE to view the Museum’s permanent collection.

Visit the Kimbell Art Museum online at: kimbellart.org, Facebook.com/kimbellart and Twitter.com/kimbellart

Kimbell Art Museum 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, TX 76107 www.kimbellart.org Kimbell Art Museum hours: Tuesdays–Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Friday, noon–8 p.m.; Sunday, noon–5 p.m.; closed Monday. For information, call 817-332-8451.

Kimbell Art Museum’s Upcoming Exhibition, A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection

van Gogh, Vincent, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888, Oil on canvas 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in.; 72.39 x 90.805 cm. Acquired 1930. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Vincent Van Gogh, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888, Oil on canvas 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in.; 72.39 x 90.805 cm. Acquired 1930. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

 

A Modern Vision

European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection

MAY 14–AUGUST 13, 2017

 

A Modern Vision: European Masterworks from the Phillips Collection will bring to the Kimbell more than seventy paintings and sculptures from one of the world’s greatest museums of modern art. The Phillips Collection, housed in the historic residence of a wealthy Pittsburgh family that moved to Washington, DC, in the 1890s, is in fact America’s first museum devoted exclusively to modern art. Duncan Phillips (1886–1966), the grandson of a prominent Pennsylvania steel magnate, built the museum’s extraordinary collection. When the museum opened in 1921 as the Phillips Memorial Art Gallery, in honor of its founder’s father and brother, the collection included work by American Impressionists and their French counterparts. The collection’s original building will undergo a thorough restoration in 2017-18; during the renovation, A Modern Vision will allow audiences worldwide access to some of its greatest treasures.

After founding the museum, Phillips married the painter Marjorie Acker; through her, and through expanding friendships with living artists, his eyes were opened to new strains in painting and sculpture. He soon expanded the ambitions and the breadth of his collection, reaching out to acquire the works of such modern American painters as Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, John Marin, and Georgia O’Keeffe, but also significant holdings of works by French, Swiss, German, and Austrian artists of the period 1850-1950. Phillips referred to the museum as an “experiment station,” and today it retains the founder’s personal stamp in a gathering of art that combines tradition, idiosyncrasy, and daring. Art, in Phillips’s opinion, was meant to inspire: “Pictures send us back to life and to other arts with the ability to see beauty all about us as we go on our accustomed ways,” Phillips wrote. “Such a quickening of perceptions is surely worth cultivating.”

Central to Phillips’s taste was a preference for intense color and design. He was the first person, for instance, to gather a group of paintings by the Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko together as a unit—a move that anticipated and even inspired Rothko’s creation of decorative series. As Robert Hughes put it, “Phillips was in fact the complete optical collector. He craved color sensation, the delight and radiance and sensory intelligence that is broadcast by an art based on color. Color healed; it consoled, it gave access to Eden. He could not understand . . . why art should be expected to do anything else.”

Duncan Phillips was an iconoclast. He rejected old-fashioned art-historical ways of organizing a museum, believing that “the really good things of all ages and all periods could be brought together . . . with such delightful results that we recognize the special affinities of artists.” A Modern Vision begins with a spare and, in Phillips’s view, quintessentially “modern” still life painted by Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin in 1726 and concludes with a highly stylized bird painted by Georges Braque in 1956, purchased in the year of Phillips’s death. In between, viewers will encounter a stunning array from the nineteenth century that begins with such masters as Courbet, Ingres, and Manet and features such icons as Honoré Daumier’s The Uprising. Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings include a superb still life by Cézanne and an intensely colored painting of dancers by Degas, in addition to landscapes by Monet, Sisley, and Van Gogh—notably the latter’s celebrated Road Menders of 1890.

Critical to the exhibition are important selections from the carefully formed “units” of works by Phillips’s twentieth-century favorites: Pierre Bonnard, including The Open Window and The Palm; Wassily Kandinsky, including a canvas added to the collection by Phillips’s friend Katherine Dreier, Sketch I for Painting with White Border (Moscow); Pablo Picasso; Oskar Kokoschka; and Georges Braque—with some seven works, among them the elegiac Shower.

A Modern Vision gathers, in the words of Duncan Phillips, “congenial spirits among the artists from different parts of the world and from different periods of time” in an unprecedented array that will both inspire and delight, demonstrating that, as Phillips believed, “art is a universal language.”

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Louis Kahn Building at the Kimbell

Exhibitions

LOUIS KAHN: THE POWER OF ARCHITECTURE

March 26, 2017 to June 25, 2017

Louis Kahn Building

The American architect Louis Kahn (1901–1974) is regarded as one of the great master builders of the 20th century. With complex spatial compositions and a choreographic mastery of light, Kahn created buildings of archaic beauty and powerful universal symbolism. Among his most important works are the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959–65), the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh (1962–83) and the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas (1966–72). The exhibition Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, organized by the Vitra Design Museum (Weil am Rhein, Germany), is the first major retrospective of Kahn’s work in two decades.

The exhibition encompasses an unprecedented and diverse range of architectural models, original drawings, photographs and films. All of Kahn’s important projects are extensively documented—-from his early urban planning concepts and single-family houses to monumental late works such as the Roosevelt Memorial in New York City (1973/74), posthumously completed in October 2012. The view of Kahn’s architectural oeuvre is augmented by a selection of watercolors, pastels and charcoal drawings created during his travels, which document his skill as an artist and illustrator. Highlights of the exhibition include a 12-foot-high model of the spectacular City Tower designed for Philadelphia (1952–57), as well as previously unpublished film footage shot by Nathanial Kahn, the son of Louis Kahn and director of the film My Architect. Interviews with architects such as Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano, Peter Zumthor and Sou Fujimoto underscore the current significance of Kahn’s work, which is being rediscovered and made accessible to a wide public audience with this exhibition.

This exhibition is organized by the Vitra Design Museum, Germany, in collaboration with the Architectural Archives of The University of Pennsylvania and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, part of the New Institute, Rotterdam. The exhibition is globally sponsored by Swarovski. Additional support is provided by The Beck Group.

Read more about the Kimbell’s exhibitions on their website.

Lectures

 

FEBRUARY 8, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

The Kimbell on the Road: Velázquez to Vigée le Brun

Nancy E. Edwards, Curator of European Art/Head of Academic Services, Kimbell Art Museum

 

FEBRUARY 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

Rembrandt, the Jews and “That Portrait” at the Kimbell

Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

 

FEBRUARY 11, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Erik Skjolsvik, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 1, 12:30 pm [Wednesday Series: Art in Context]

El Greco’s Portrait of Francisco de Pisa and the Instability of Portraiture in Renaissance Spain

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, Southern Methodist University,

Dallas

 

March 4, 11 am [The Artist’s Eye]

The Artist’s Eye

Letitia Huckaby, Fort Worth

 

MARCH 10, 6 pm [Friday Evening Lectures]

As Much Taste and More Beauty: The Irish Country House Revealed

Robert O’Byrne, Fine and Decorative Arts Writer, Navan, County Meath, Ireland

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 2017

Symposium

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Monet, Green Wave, c. 1866–67, Oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, H. O. Havemeyer Collection; Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.111)

Monet, Green Wave, c. 1866–67, Oil on canvas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, H. O. Havemeyer Collection; Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.111)

MONET: THE EARLY YEARS

October 16, 2016 to January 29, 2017

This groundbreaking exhibition is the first ever devoted to the young genius of Claude Monet. Monet: The Early Years will feature approximately 60 paintings from the first phase of the artist’s career, from his Normandy debut in 1858 until 1872, when he settled in Argenteuil, on the River Seine near Paris.

LEARN MORE

 

UPCOMING FRIDAY EVENING LECTURES

 

Friday Evening Lectures

Monet at the First Impressionist Exhibition

Friday, November 11, 2016 –

6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

 

Friday Evening Lectures

Between Past and Future: Monet’s Bridges

Friday, January 13, 2017 –

6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

 

Friday Evening Lectures

Rembrandt, the Jews, and “That Portrait” at the Kimbell

Friday, February 10, 2017 –

6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Mark Rosen, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

1581 map of a region of Gueytlalpa, Mexico, from the Relaciones Geograficas of King Philip II of Spain. It is part of a manuscript book answering questions about the region for the king, interspersed with drawings of the territory, probably by a native hand. I studied this at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at UT Austin.

1581 map of a region of Gueytlalpa, Mexico, from the Relaciones Geograficas of King Philip II of Spain. It is part of a manuscript book answering questions about the region for the king, interspersed with drawings of the territory, probably by a native hand. I studied this at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at UT Austin.

I was fortunate to have been awarded an SFDA by the School of Arts and Humanities at UT Dallas for the academic year 2015–16, and have used it to research and begin writing a book entitled The Bird’s-Eye View and the Viewer, concerning the links between the visual, technological, and rhetorical strategies employed by the precursor to the modern city map.

Anyone who has ever looked at maps recognizes the progression from the medieval “city icon” view to the Enlightenment-era ground plan to the satellite-based GPS matrices we regularly employ today.

My work concerns the moment when the purely visual mode of mapping began to insist not only upon the verisimilitude of the viewer’s experience but also of the mechanical measurements that made it possible. Addressing the means by which territory was surveyed, measured, and depicted, my study rethinks the way artists and cartographers chose to orient their viewers towards landscapes both familiar and foreign.

A print illustrating how to construct one’s own plane table to survey territory. It comes from the following book: Leonhard Zubler, Fabrica et usus instrumenti chorographici (Basel, 1607). I saw it at the Huntington.

A print illustrating how to construct one’s own plane table to survey territory. It comes from the book Leonhard Zubler, Fabrica et usus instrumenti chorographici (Basel, 1607). I saw it at the Huntington.

As research for this project, I’ve held short-term residential fellowships in the past year from the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, and the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. In addition, I was invited by the Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art in Paris to participate in the “Allegory and Topography in the Early Modern Period (16th-18th Centuries)” symposium, held in June 2016, at which I presented a section of the book project, “The Pierre Levée of Poitiers as Allegorical Site in the Civitates orbis terrarum.”

My forthcoming publications include an archive-based study of the early–seventeenth century “Sultan” Jachia ben Mehmet, published in the edited volume The Grand Ducal Medici and Their Archive (Turnhout: Harvey Miller, 2016), and a detailed analysis of the maritime-themed façade of the late Seicento Venetian church of Santa Maria del Giglio. During the past year, I presented at the Meadows Museum colloquium Alba: Lives and Afterlives of a Historic Collection and spoke on Guercino’s Christ and the Woman of Samaria at the Sixteenth Century Society Conference in Vancouver and at the painting’s home institution, the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth. I also serve on the board of the Italian Art Society and as the society’s webmaster.

Mark Rosen
Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

The Meadows Museum at SMU to host Zurbarán Masterworks in 2017

Zurbarán Paintings as installed in Auckland Castle

Zurbarán Paintings as installed in Auckland Castle

The Meadows Museum at SMU announces a touring exhibition of life-size paintings by the Spanish Golden Age master Francisco de Zurbarán (1598–1664), on loan from Auckland Castle in England. Proposed by the Meadows—in collaboration with The Frick Collection, the Kimbell Art Museum, and the Auckland Castle Trust—the project includes an analysis of the paintings at the Kimbell’s noted conservation lab, as well as a scholarly publication about the unique history of this series, the most significant public collection of the artist’s work outside of Spain. The exhibition marks the first time these works will travel to the United States, and will premiere at the Meadows in September 2017, followed by a presentation at The Frick Collection beginning in January 2018.

For the full release visit here.

Kimbell Art Museum Exhibitions, Lectures, and Film

Le Nain Three Men and a Boy c. 1640–45 Oil on canvas National Gallery, London

Le Nain, Three Men and a Boy, c. 1640–45, Oil on canvas, National Gallery, London

Exhibitions

 

THE BROTHERS LE NAIN: PAINTERS OF SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE

May 22, 2016 to September 11, 2016

 

MONET: THE EARLY YEARS

October 16, 2016 to January 29, 2017

 

Lecture programs

Friday Evening Lectures

SELECTED FRIDAYS, 6 pm
Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held throughout the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art. They are free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Pavilion Auditorium

SEPTEMBER 9
Mount Stuart, the Last Great Island Treasure House
Alice Martin, head of historic collections, Mount Stuart Trust, Mount Stuart, Isle of Bute, United Kingdom

SEPTEMBER 23
Buckingham Palace, its History, Occupants, and Contents
Oliver Everett, librarian emeritus of the Royal Library, Windsor Castle, United Kingdom

 

Wednesday Series: Art in Context

SELECTED WEDNESDAYS, 12:30 pm
OCTOBER 5
Genies in the Palace: Royal Art of Iraq’s First Empire
Stephanie Langin-Hooper, assistant professor and Karl Kilinski II Endowed Chair of Hellenic Visual Culture, Meadows School of the Arts, Southern Methodist University, Dallas

 

Symposium
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 10:15 am–1 pm
Monet: The Early Years

 

Films

SEPTEMBER 4 – 2:00 PM  Hidden Lives of Masterpieces: Watteau
OCTOBER 23 – 2:00 PM    The Impressionists: Painting and Revolution — Gang of Four
OCTOBER 30 – 2:00 PM   The Impressionists: Painting and Revolution–The Great Outdoors

Exhibition Highlight: Monet: The Early Years at The Kimbell

Monet_banks_of_seine_banner_0

Monet: The Early Years
October 16, 2016 – January 29, 2017
On view in the Renzo Piano Pavilion

This groundbreaking exhibition is the first ever devoted to the young genius of Claude Monet.  Monet: The Early Years will feature approximately 60 paintings from the first phase of the artist’s career, from his Normandy debut in 1858 until 1872, when he settled in Argenteuil, on the River Seine near Paris.  Through the 1860s, the young painter — still in his twenties — absorbed and transformed a variety of influences, as the lessons of the Barbizon school and his mentor Boudin gave way to the challenges posed by his friends Manet, Pissarro, Renoir and Sisley.  On the strength of his invention of a highly personal and distinctive mode of painting, the young man positioned himself as an artist to be recognized and to be reckoned with.

Monet: The Early Years examines this period in depth, through the greatest examples of his painting — drawn from museums in the United States, Europe and Japan. The exhibition will enrich our understanding of the ways in which Monet’s artistic innovation and personal ambition evolved in tandem.

The exhibition is organized by the Kimbell Art Museum in collaboration with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities and a grant from the Leo Potishman Foundation, JP Morgan Chase, Trustee.

 More information on visiting the Kimbell can be found here.