Tag: Lauren LaRocca

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

O’Donnell Institute Fellows’ Preview of Francisco Moreno’s The Chapel and Accompanying Works at Erin Cluley Gallery, April 4, 2018.

It’s been an exciting spring with guest lectures by distinguished art historians.  Dr. Yve-Alain Bois gave a riveting lecture at the Nasher Sculpture Center on Matisse’s use of the bamboo stick in his drawing practice, with a focus on his late stations of the cross.  Our O’Donnell Institute Visiting Research Professor, Dr. Suzanne Preston Blier, presented her new material on Picasso’s most famous painting, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, soon to be published in a new book.  On the eve of his retirement Dr. Thomas Gaehtgens, Director of the Getty Research Institute, spoke about the ways in which the greatest 19th century German museum director, Wilhelm von Bode, dealt with the pervasive European fear that Americans were purloining European culture.

EODIAH’s own Drs. Sarah Kozlowski and Elizabeth Ranieri gave an exciting report on February 27 on the O’Donnell Institute’s new research center in Naples.  The Center for the Art and Architectural History of Port Cities will launch in Fall 2018, and great strides have been made to prepare for the first group of research residents, who will begin to arrive in August.

Our O’Donnell fellows had the opportunity to preview local artist Francisco Moreno’s The Chapel and Accompanying Works large-scale painting installation at Erin Cluley Gallery on April 4, prior to its public opening.  The presentation features Moreno’s all-encompassing painting surface based on the barrel-vaulted structure of the Spanish Romanesque mural paintings from the Hermitage of la Vera Cruz (Maderuelo) installed in the Prado, Madrid.  The Chapel will be on view through May 19 at the Erin Cluley Gallery.

Planning is underway for our fall programs; visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ later this summer and plan your calendar!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

“Patterns of Islamic Art” at the O’Donnell Institute Research Center at the Dallas Museum of Art, 2017, photograph by Carolyn Brown

 

We are excited to welcome everyone to join us this fall for our scholarly programs in the Research Center. Upon her completion of the first English-language translations of Paul Gauguin’s seven texts, UTD Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr. Elpida Vouitsis discussed on August 29th how Gauguin’s writing style successfully communicates the duality of meaning in his artworks. In November our fellows have the special opportunity to visit the recent installation of Keir Collection objects with Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir. Our semester will conclude with a workshop by one of our new PhD fellows, Edleeca Thompson. Her research examines the myriad of ways museums display African art collections and how these design decisions effect interpretation.

The Research Center will host two new exhibitions this fall: Patterns in Islamic Art and Maya Trade and the Ulúa River Regions. I’ve curated a selection of Carolyn Brown’s photographs of Islamic architecture in the Middle East. Her images beautifully capture the nonfigural design elements in Islamic art: geometric, vegetal, and calligraphic. Patterns repeat and intertwine in colorful tiles on mosque façades and delicate stained glass that decorate intimate interiors. Our fourth vitrine installation, curated by DMA Curator Dr. Kimberly Jones, displays small ceramic vessels from the Ulúa region in Honduras. Despite their diminutive size, these objects were bound up in networks of trade and exchange throughout the Classic Maya kingdoms.

The Research Center promises to be a lively center of scholarly activity this fall with a new group of fellows from around the globe. We look forward to the coming year and welcome you to our many Fall programs. Visit our website at https://utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs/ and plan your calendar!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Research Center

 

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches)

 

We’ve had an exciting spring semester of workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. A diverse range of topics were presented including Ethiopian manuscript painting, museum exhibition design, and the impact of water mixable oils (WMOs) on current art conservation practice. The semester will conclude with two workshops at the EODIAH Research Center. On April 18 SMU Professor of Art Dr. Michael Corris will present his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art, “a compilation of insightful, first-hand accounts of art making, art criticism, and exhibition organizing from the early-1970s to the present.” EODIAH fellow and newly minted Ph.D. Dr. Joseph Hartman will present his research at our final workshop of the semester on April 25,Cuba Incarcerated: The Historic Vision of Cuban Prison Architecture. The Research Center continues to be a hive of scholarly activity and a space in which to display artworks.

Curated by our own Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, the third vitrine installation showcases beautiful lusterware ceramics from the Keir Collection. The collection of objects tells the story of the revolutionary technique of luster painting with examples from Iraq, Iran, and Egypt. Come by and view our ‘sneak peek’ of Islamic lusterware before the next installation of Keir objects at the DMA opens April 18 in the Focus I Gallery.

Be sure to visit the EODIAH Programs page on our website this summer to view our Fall 2017 events!

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the EODIAH Research Center

Thank you to everyone who joined us last fall at our workshops and events.  Our speakers presented thought-provoking research and the resulting discourses were lively and insightful.  We are excited to offer a full slate of programs for the coming spring semester, and welcome guest speakers from other cultural institutions.  Our two-day February symposium, Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques, brings together art historians, curators, and conservators to explore artists’ writings about materials and techniques.  Robyn Hodgkins, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Trinity University in San Antonio, will visit us to discuss modern and contemporary oil paint formulations.  In particular, Hodgkins will look at two van Gogh paintings from the National Gallery of Art and then a closer look at a new category of oil paint, water mixable oils (WMOs).  DMA Director of Exhibition and Museum Design Jessica Harden will provide a ‘behind-the-scenes’ look at how exhibition design impacts the artwork and visitor experience.

 Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University


Robyn Hodgkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Trinity University

In March, fellows have the unique opportunity to tour the eclectic art collection of local collector James A. Ledbetter which includes African, Asian and Modern European works. DFW area university faculty from SMU and UT Dallas will present their contributions to local scholarship including Dr. Michael Corris who will showcase his new publication, Leaving Skull City: The Afterlife of (Some) Conceptual Art.  A variety of topics will be presented by our UT Dallas fellows including Leslie Reid, who will give a gallery talk at the DMA on Modernist architecture of universal art museums focusing on architect Edward Larrabee Barnes’ design.

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

Emblem I. A Conversation. Conviction and persuasion are not called for in a dialogue. This discord may be fatal but it is not serious. The fingers point, the coffee is strong and hot, the skull session continues. (2015) (Monoprint, acrylic on paper, 22 x 27 inches).

 

We have an exciting spring ahead and hope that all of you can join us!

 

Lauren LaRocca

Coordinator of Special Programs

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

 

 

Report of the Director

Richard Brettell - AH - Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair in Aesthetic Studies - Art History

Dr. Richard R. Brettell

In the land of art history, summer was the time to travel to research sites and work on projects before the busy fall at the O’Donnell Institute. EODIAH’s faculty, fellows, and graduate students have done just that as we continue to make an impact on art history throughout the country and the world. Two of our fellows, James Rodriguez and Kristine Larison, have been launched into the world, bringing news of EODIAH to their new homes in Indiana and Pennsylvania. Fellow Fabienne Ruppen from the University of Zürich visited museums and collections in the U.S. and Europe and spent time with her family in the Swiss Alps before returning to Dallas refreshed and ready to tackle her dissertation on Cézanne’s drawings. And Fellow Paul Galvez spent the summer in Princeton with trips to New England and California museums in his quest to finish his book on Gustave Courbet’s landscapes.

Our biggest achiever since our last newsletter was UT Dallas Distinguished Scholar in Residence Bonnie Pitman, who worked with EODIAH and DMA colleagues to create a pathbreaking conference at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Its focus was on partnerships between art museums and medical schools to cultivate the art of observation in medical students and physicians. By all accounts it was a great success. Congratulations, Bonnie–we await the story in the New York Times!

Assistant Director Dr. Sarah Kozlowski and I worked hard to further two of the Institute’s international partnerships. Sarah made an important trip to Naples to meet with our partner, Dr. Sylvain Bellenger, Director of the Capodimonte Museum in that extraordinary city and to make headway on a multi-year project of collaboration between EODIAH, the Museum in Naples, and the Sorbonne in Paris. She reveals more below. I had a bracing tour of our new Swiss partner’s headquarters, The Swiss Institute for Art Research (www.sik-isea.ch/en-us), with whom we are working closely as we contemplate the future of a Barrett Museum of Swiss Art at UT Dallas. Located in a stunningly restored and expanded villa in the hills above Zürich, the Swiss Institute is the most important place globally for advanced research on Swiss Art.

Giacometti plasters in the Kunsthaus Zürich

Giacometti plasters in the Kunsthaus Zürich

Our ATEC-EODIAH faculty member Dr. Max Schich had a summer of global travel in his quest to make UT Dallas a world center for large data art history. He also is working on a promising partnership with the Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte in Munich, whose former Director Dr. Wolf Tegethoff spoke at our founding. Under Max’s leadership we will see a steady stream of visitors from Munich to Dallas in the 2016-2017 academic year.

In one year, we have established alliances with important museums and institutes in three European cities. These are multi-year commitments that will insure that EODIAH has an important foothold in the places where our discipline was born.

This fall we welcome the return of Drs. Mark Rosen and Charissa Terranova, who each had academic leaves in 2015-2016 and are returning to the fold refreshed by a solid year of research. Each of their reports is below. While they were away, we constructed exciting new offices for these important scholars in the EODIAH complex at UT Dallas so that they can say farewell to their old offices in the Jonsson Building and come to be with us. This fall, we will ALL be together in the ATEC Building for the first time since our founding two years ago. We thank the new Dean of ATEC, Dr. Anne Balsamo, for allowing the Institute’s expansion in her wonderful building.

One of our most important accomplishments this past year has been to dramatically increase the Institute’s collection of scholarly books about art. This effort was begun at our founding with the gift of New York and London auction catalogues by the New York collectors Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Phillips. This gift has truly started an avalanche of books from institutional and private donors. The first was a complete set of contemporary auction catalogues from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and this was followed by the American auction catalogues and private library of the late Perry Rathbone, the distinguished museum administrator and scholar who recently died at his home in Connecticut. From this followed the gift of substantial parts of the art libraries of S. Roger Horchow and the late Nash Flores, each important collectors of art books in areas not covered seriously at UT Dallas. All of this material was capably catalogued and organized on our Cunningham-designed book shelves by students from The Greenhill School. We have also just acquired a private library devoted to Islamic art formed by Dr. Oliver Watson, the I.M. Pei Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Oxford. This library will support ongoing study and research focused on the Keir Collection at the DMA.

About one 20th of the Comini library

About one 20th of the Comini library

And, if all of this was not enough, an Institute mailing that featured photographs of our book-lined offices so inspired the great art historian Dr. Alessandra Comini, Professor Emerita at SMU, that she has decided to bequeath her extraordinary library devoted to German, Austrian, and Scandinavian art as well as art produced by women artists to the Institute. When Sarah Kozlowski and I went with Alessandra through this private library, which approaches 30,000 volumes, we were in complete awe. The Comini library will be the largest gift of scholarly books in UT Dallas’s history.

This fall, our wonderful new staff member Lauren LaRocca is going to bring EODIAH-DMA alive. Lauren is curating an exhibition of Carolyn Brown’s architectural photographs of the Mexican Baroque city of Puebla and made possible a joint installation of global works of art in the DMA’s collection that use trade beads, the latter co-curated by the DMA’s superb Dr. Roslyn A. Walker, Senior Curator of the Arts of Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific and The Margaret McDermott Curator of African Art, and myself. Both installations will open this fall. Lauren has also worked with us and the DMA to create an incredible fall lineup of programs for the Institute at both the DMA and UT Dallas. And she worked with the DMA so that its new mobile app was conceived and worked through in EODIAH’s research center.

The DMA is our full partner, and it is exciting that we will do so much more in the Museum this year than we did in the months after the opening of our wonderful mirror-ceilinged space. We eagerly await the DMA’s new Director, Augustín Arteaga, so that we can work together even more. And we thank the departing Olivier Meslay for working so well with us thus far.

In the short two-year period since the Institute was founded, we have tried to become THE place for art history in North Texas and to make a global footprint as well. This next year will be devoted to hiring another O’Donnell Chair and to launching our Master’s Program in Art History. As we move forward, we are sprinting, not walking! What has made me the happiest is the number of individual donors who have decided to join us on our race toward excellence. Our wonderful Director of Development, Lucy Buchanan, will tell you all about our new friends!

 

Richard R. Brettell, Ph.D.

Founding Director, The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History and the Margaret McDermott Distinguished Chair

Greetings from the Assistant Director

Thanks to all of you who joined us on September 2 at The Wilcox Space to celebrate the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year, and the close of the two-part installation John Wilcox: Diptychs and Polyptychs. Stay tuned for news of the next installation, which will open in mid-Fall.

This Fall we are pleased to welcome four new O’Donnell Fellows to the Institute, where they will pursue research on topics from Cuba to Ethiopia. Leslie Reid is a UT Dallas doctoral candidate completing a dissertation entitled Abu Dhabi, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, and Shigaraki: A Comparative Analysis of the Modernist Architecture of Five Universal Art Museums. Evan (Poe) Johnson, also a doctoral student at UT Dallas, will join us as he completes his dissertation, The Fandom of Lynching and the Remediated Black Body. Joseph Hartman comes to us from Southern Methodist University and is in the final stages of his dissertation, Modern Dreams: Image, Space, and Politics in Machado’s Cuba, 1925-1933. And Jacopo Gnisci, who just completed his PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, will be in residence to work on the Dallas Museum of Art’s collection of Ethiopian crosses and to continue his research on fifteenth-century icon painting in Ethiopia.

We have a full slate of programs for the coming semester, which Lauren LaRocca highlights in her noteWith Lauren’s leadership we continue to develop our partnership with the DMA and with other area institutions including the Crow Collection of Asian Art, with whom we will present a symposium in January in conjunction with the exhibition Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles. We are also happy to collaborate with the DMA Conservation Studio and the Nasher Sculpture Center to present a symposium in February called Artists’ Writings on Materials and Techniques. We will welcome James Meyer from DIA and Michael Cole from Columbia as keynote speakers. As these programs demonstrate, one of our goals at the O’Donnell Institute is to foster collaborations between the academy and the museum, and to create a space for generative dialogue among academics, curators, conservators, and conservation scientists.

It’s just those kinds of dialogues that will unfold every Friday afternoon this Fall in my graduate seminar, The Material Lives of Artworks. Based at the DMA and at collections throughout Dallas and Fort Worth, the seminar will explore the history of artistic materials and techniques and the broader question of how materials and the act of making create meaning. Each seminar meeting will focus on a single medium (silver, ceramic, or paint, for example), and will combine close visual and physical analysis of artworks, conversations with scholars, curators, and conservators, and readings in both artists’ writings and recent art historical literature.

In July I traveled to Naples, where Sylvain Bellenger, Director of the Museo di Capodimonte and I continued our work on plans to launch a collaboration dedicated to incubating and communicating innovative research on the history of art in Naples, with particular focus on the cultural histories of port cities and the mobilities of artworks. While centered on Naples, our work will inform understanding of port cities and cultural centers throughout the world, from antiquity to the present. The Capodimonte/O’Donnell Institute collaboration will take the form of two programs: Workshops and Research Residencies. In an annual spring Workshop or Laboratorio, the O’Donnell Institute and the Capodimonte will convene an international group of scholars in Naples for two days of site- and collection-based presentations and roundtable discussions on a chosen theme. In our Research Residency program, advanced graduate students and early-career scholars will pursue research in residence at the Capodimonte on projects related to Naples and the cultural history of port cities. Our long-term vision is to expand the collaboration by inviting other institutions to sponsor Workshops and Residencies that will support the work of scholars from around the world in Naples. The Université Paris-Sorbonne, the Soprintendenza di Genova, and the Soprintendenza di Pompeii have already expressed interest in participating in the project. Our goal is to open the Capodimonte and the city of Naples to an international scholarly community, making the city a laboratory for creativity and collaboration. Sylvain, Rick and I all look forward to sharing news of the project with colleagues and friends of the Institute in the coming months.

As the slower pace of the Summer months set in, I had the chance to immerse myself in a new project on diptychs in fourteenth-century Naples. The project brings together for the first time a small but significant corpus of diptychs commissioned and collected at the Angevin court, with particular focus on how these mobile artworks fit into a whole network of artists, patrons, and objects in motion throughout the Mediterranean.

It’s with great anticipation that I look ahead to the coming year and to welcoming you to our many Fall programs and gatherings, which you will find on our website: utdallas.edu/arthistory/programs. Join us!

Dr. Sarah K. Kozlowski
Assistant Director
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History

Report from the EODIAH Research Center

Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Apples on a Sideboard, 1900–1906, Dallas Museum of Art

Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Apples on a Sideboard, 1900–1906, Dallas Museum of Art

We are excited to offer a full slate of programs for the coming semester. Fall workshops by guest speakers include the newly appointed curators at the Crow Collection of Asian Art, Dr. Jacqueline Chao and Dr. Qing Chang; Dr. Davide Gasparotto, Senior Curator of Paintings at the Getty; and Dr. Julian Henderson, Professor and Chair of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham.  As a testament to the richness of local scholarship, a number of workshops will be given by UT Dallas and UT Arlington affiliates including Dr. Roger Malina, Dr. Mary Vaccaro, and Dr. David McPhail in his new conservation lab at the UTD Bioengineering and Science Building. Our very own fellow, Fabienne Ruppen, will lead a discussion on Cezanne’s Still Life with Apples on a Sideboard in the DMA study room.

In September, fellows have the special opportunity to tour the contemporary art collection and library of art curator and collector Charles Dee Mitchell. October promises a lively conversation between Dr. Brettell and Dr. Alessandra Comini to discuss the making of cultural capitals as illustrated by Paris and Vienna. The semester will culminate with an enlivening lecture in late November by Dr. Phillipe de Montebello followed by our annual EODIAH dinner.

Carolyn Brown, Workmen: San Francisco Acatepec, Puebla, Mexico, 1995

Carolyn Brown, Workmen: San Francisco Acatepec, Puebla, Mexico, 1995

The Research Center will host two new exhibitions this fall; both explore the global trade of ideas and materials.  Carolyn Brown’s photography captures the innovative brilliance of Talavera tiled churches in Puebla, Mexico. I curated the installation in conjunction with the Crow Collection’s special exhibition Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles. Our second vitrine installation, a collaborative effort between Dr. Brettell and DMA Curator Dr. Roslyn Walker, showcases the museum’s vast collections of beaded objects.  The international trade of artworks like beads introduced a vivacity of color and design into works of art.

Finally, we’re thrilled to announce that DMA Curator Dr. Anne Bromberg will teach a UT Dallas graduate seminar at the Research Center in Spring 2017 on Indian Art. Dr. Bromberg will use the superb collections at the DMA, much of which has been acquired under her leadership. This is a unique opportunity for students to study with one of the foremost scholars of Indian Art.

Our institutional partnership with the DMA continues to thrive and develop in new ways.  We hope you’ll join us this fall for our many exciting programs!

 

Lauren LaRocca
Coordinator of Special Programs
The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History