Tag: Meadows Museum

Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, and Lectures

Exhibitions

Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida 

Through Jun. 3, 2018

Eduardo Chillida (1924-2002) is one of the major sculptors of the post-war international art movement. His monumental public works can be found throughout Spain, Europe and the Americas. Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida presents 66 works of sculpture, drawing, collage, gravitations, graphic works, and a small selection of artists’ books, representing a general view of the mature phase of this key sculptor of the post-war avant-garde.

 

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), Beach at Portici, 1874. Oil on canvas, 27 x 51 ¼ in. (68.6 x 130.2 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase with funds from Mary Anne Cree, Mrs. Eugene McDermott, Susan Heldt Albritton, Linda P. and William A. Custard, Gwen and Richard Irwin, Shirley and Bill McIntyre, Cyrena Nolan, Peggy and Carl Sewell, Gene and Jerry Jones, Pilar and Jay Henry, Barbara and Mike McKenzie, Caren Prothro, Marilyn Augur, Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Barzune, Diane and Stuart Bumpas, The Honorable Janet Kafka and Mr. Terry Kafka, the Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Levy Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas, Stacey and Nicholas McCord, Linda and John McFarland, Catherine Blaffer Taylor, Julie and George Tobolowsky, Cheryl and Kevin Vogel, Diane and Gregory Warden, Natalie and George Lee, Estelle and Michael Thomas, Bethany and Samuel Holland, President R. Gerald and Gail Turner, Kathleen and Mark Roglán, and an Anonymous Donor. MM.2017.03. Photo by Robert LaPrelle

At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase 

Jun. 24-Sep. 23, 2018

The Meadows Museum, SMU, has acquired Beach at Portici, the last painting of famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838-1874). The nearly finished painting—which is unusual for its large scale, relative to much of the artist’s work—depicts the enjoyment of a summer day at the beach, and demonstrates Fortuny’s hallmark ability to capture light in paint. Fortuny was an especially popular artist with 19th-century American collectors and audiences, as the particularly American provenance of this work reveals. Reflecting the high esteem in which Fortuny’s works were held, Beach at Portici was featured prominently in the American Pavilion’s “Loan Collection of Foreign Masterpieces Owned in the United States” at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Considered one of the most important international exhibitions of the 19th century, these works were selected to show off to the Fair’s wide audiences— more than 27 million people visited during its six-month run—the richness and breadth of paintings owned by American collectors and museums, and implicitly, American economic prowess, and refined taste in fine art.

Beach at Portici will be on view at the Meadows Museum beginning January 19, 2018. From June 24 through September 23, it will be the subject of a focused exhibition, At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase, where it will be paired with a loan from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Chase’s Idle Hours (c. 1894). The Spanish artist had a significant impact on many important American artists and perhaps especially on Chase, who knew his work well and greatly admired it.

Read more about “At the Beach”

Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration 

Through Dec. 2, 2018

 

Events

Family Program: A Day at the Beach

Jun. 23, 10:00 am

 

Lectures

Lecture Series: Light, Camera, Landscape: The Rise of International Impressionism

May 31-Jun. 14, 6:00-7:30 pm

Nancy Cohen Israel

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: At the Beach: Mariano Fortuny y Marsal and William Merritt Chase

Jun. 28, 6:00 pm

Mark A. Roglán and Andrew Walker

Meadows Museum

Farewell to Bill Jordan

William Jordan at his Turtle Creek home in Dallas, Aug. 9, 2017 (Cooper Neill/The New York Times)

When Bill Jordan moved to Dallas in 1967 to lead the art department at Southern Methodist University and form the collection of the incipient Meadows Museum, he was a recent Ph.D. with no experience either of the art market or with museum or university administration. Within a few short years, he had assembled the nucleus of the most distinguished collection of Spanish art in America outside the Hispanic Society in New York. A quick study, he learned the ways of the highly complex art market in European old master paintings, and with art historical training and an “eye” (as we said in those days), he could tell fakes, copies, and ruined paintings from authentic and correctly attributed ones, and could spot unknown pictures of real quality, snapping them up for little money because he knew that their attributions would come in time.

His keenly observant connoisseurship had few equals in the realm of Spanish painting, and as he learned the market for Spanish art he was able to shape the Meadows’ collection with both masterpieces by great artists and wonderful works by secondary ones. He did so with money provided by his patron, Algur Meadows, and this shy young man from San Antonio became a friend and confidant of one of the most powerful oil men in America. As the Meadows Museum strengthened and, particularly, after Mr. Meadows’ death, Bill became restless with his focused teaching and collecting at SMU and was hired in 1976 as an Adjunct Curator of European Art for the Dallas Museum of Art, continuing his work at SMU at the same time.

This move – inconsequential as it seemed—allowed him greater sway over the larger population of Dallas. Not only did he work to bring the landmark El Greco exhibition to the Dallas Museum of Fine Art in Fair Park in 1982-1983, but he also advised the trustees of the Museum and The Foundation for the Arts in their acquisitions. The most significant acquisition he masterminded was Courbet’s great 1860 Fox in the Snow, in 1979. This, an early acquisition of the John B. O’Hara Fund, was completely outside his field of art historical expertise and demonstrated the range of his knowledge both of art history and of the art market.

Bill’s years of experience at the Meadows and the DMA readied him to extend the range of his art historical responsibilities, and his good friend and former colleague Ted Pillsbury, Director of the Kimbell Art Museum, recognized that he didn’t have to go to New York or Europe for a talented and well-trained connoisseur of European art. Instead, he hired Bill, whose years in Fort Worth were as distinguished as those in Dallas. As Deputy Director at the Kimbell, Bill had the luxury of larger budgets for exhibitions and acquisitions and, together with Ted, was responsible for a string of brilliant additions to the collection and designed an exhibitions program that was the envy of museums throughout the world. Bill left the Kimbell in 1990 to become an independent scholar.

He did all of this without ever raising his voice, expressing an opinion in a strong manner, or making waves. Modesty and politeness were his calling cards—perhaps for that reason, he usually “got his way” with little struggle. As his career developed, his life-style changed from the casual informality of a young curator to an almost courtly style which he maintained with no pretention. I well remember taking my graduate students from UT Austin to his small house in the Park Cities in 1977 or 1978 to find the walls filled with old master and modern drawings, many in search of attributions that he soon provided. It was a classic curator’s collection.

Bill spent his later years with his life partner Robert Brownlee in a Turtle Creek apartment building in which most of the inhabitants had connections to the art world. The two men lived in an atmosphere of refined elegance, and their collection assumed greater importance with major drawings by artists like Delacroix and Cézanne, varied works of sculpture, and old master paintings. A combination of modern and traditional furniture formed a perfect frame for this supremely personal collection of art.

As with all else in Bill’s world, his life was private–easily opened up to friends from the global art community and from Dallas and Fort Worth society, but never trumpeted through publicity or frequent “art tours.” His world was shared with Robert and with their closest friends.

After the Kimbell years, Bill joined many boards both locally and nationally. He was an essential member of the boards of the Nasher Sculpture Center, The Dallas Museum of Art, and The Foundation for the Arts. His advice about acquisitions and exhibitions at the Meadows, a museum he essentially created, was only offered when sought and, fortunately, that was often. He also became involved with the Chinati Foundation in Marfa.

Bill financed his post-Kimbell years by working as a private art dealer, working with his usual discretion to bring works of art discerning museums and collectors together. Again, this highly successful avocation was never trumpeted, and many of his friends had no knowledge that his considerable eye was put to the benefit of others in the market. Although this part of his career is not usually mentioned as a capstone to a life of scholarship and museum work, it was no less important, and his careful placement of works of art in public and private collections was as distinguished as all other aspects of his varied career.

But Bill could never do just one thing at a time. In the past five years, Olivier Meslay involved him in the creation of an exhibition and scholarly catalogue of modern European drawings from local private collections at the DMA, and few projects at the Nasher or the DMA happened without his blessing. If Bill didn’t like something, he rarely said anything, but his friends and colleagues could always tell.

All agree that the high point of his long and distinguished career was his personal acquisition in 1988 of an anonymous seventeenth-century Spanish portrait of Phillip III of Spain. Bill was convinced that the painting was by no less than Velázquez, three of whose paintings he had acquired for the Meadows Museum and one for the Kimbell. He lived with it at home for many years, but when his attribution to Velázquez was widely recognized, Bill gave the invaluable portrait to the American Friends of the Prado Museum, where it is on display with the museum’s definitive collection of works by Velasquez. The English edition of the museum’s book on Phillip III has recently been released by the American Friends of Prado Museum. Bill’s supreme achievement as a scholar of Spanish art was recognized when the Prado appointed him to its board of directors.

The boy who was born in Nashville, raised in San Antonio, and educated in Virginia and New York, spent his life enriching Dallas and Fort Worth in so many ways that it is impossible to recount. He was, in short, the most important teacher and museum professional of his generation in Texas. Yet this final appointment to the board of directors of the greatest museum in Spain provided a real sense that his Texas career mattered to the world at large. In his final days in Clements Hospital in Dallas, he spent hours daily emailing friends far and wide, making plans for meetings, meals, trips, and projects that, sadly, will never happen. How we all wish they had.

At the O’Donnell Institute, our last memory of Bill came from his participation with art historians, conservators, and museum professionals from the U.S. and Spain at a scholars’ day co-sponsored by the Meadows and EODIAH. He looked pale and ill, but his eyes sparkled and he told stories and sharpened our observations with his thoughtful comments. It was to be his last visit to his beloved Meadows, and all of us with him will remember that day because we shared it with Bill.

Prado Museum Publication

The Prado Museum in Spain published in June 2017 a book on the discovery made by Mr. William B. Jordan of the oil on canvas painting, Portait of King Philip III, and its firm attribution to Diego Velázquez.
The publication in Spanish is available at the Prado bookstore.
It includes essays by: William B. Jordan, art historian; John Elliot, art historian; Javier Portus, Chief Curator of Spanish painting (up to 1700) at the Prado Museum; and Jaime García-Maiquez, member of the Technical Studio of the Conservation Dept. of the Prado Museum.
Since William B. Jordan donated the work to American Friends of the Prado Museum, the Prado made plans to publish the same book in English.

Art History Community Mourns the Loss of Curator Nicole Atzbach

Nicole Atzbach, the tenacious and brilliant curator at the Meadows Museum and a true friend of the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, passed away on November 4, 2017 after a battle with cancer. Active until weeks before her death, she involved herself with her usual gusto in what was to be her final project, a fascinating exhibition juxtaposing Cubist still-life and landscape paintings by Diego Rivera and Pablo Picasso. Her aim was nothing less than revolutionary for art history: to demonstrate that the Mexican expatriate actually engaged the now famous Picasso in a kind of duel of formal invention, particularly in creating paintings that combined elements of the still-life and landscape genres. The exhibition, though small, was revelatory, and it capped what was a short but significant career as curator at the Meadows Museum. We at EODIAH shall all miss our late colleague.

A memorial service in celebration of her life was held at the Museum on Saturday, Dec. 9, at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requested that donations to a scholarship fund set up by them for her children may be sent to Geoff Atzbach, 3020 Hollycrest Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80920.

Read more from SMU’s website

 

Meadows Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Eduardo Chillida (Spanish, 1924–2002), Gure aitaren etxea (1ª versión Nº 2) / Our Father’s House (1st Version No. 2), 1985. Iron. © Zabalaga-Leku. ARS, New York / VEGAP, Madrid, 2017. Courtesy The Estate of Eduardo Chillida and Hauser & Wirth

Exhibition

Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida

February 4 –  June 3, 2018

This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

 

Eduardo Chillida, Year 1963. Photo: Budd, N.Y. © Zabalaga-Leku. ARS, New York / VEGAP, Madrid, 2017. Courtesy The Estate of Eduardo Chillida and Hauser & Wirth

 

 

Dalí: Poetics of the Small

The Meadows Museum, SMU, will present the first in-depth exploration of the small-scale paintings of Salvador Dalí (1904–1989). While many of Dalí’s canvases are known around the world and are among the defining works of the Surrealist movement, the small size of many of these works is frequently overlooked. Nearly half of the artist’s paintings during the early part of his Surrealist period (1929–1936) were actually small format works: some measuring just over a foot, and others as small as 3 x 2 in. Organized by the Meadows as part of its mission to present Spanish art in America, Dalí: Poetics of the Small will be on view at the Meadows Museum—the only venue for this exhibition—from September 9–December 9, 2018.
Read more at the Meadows website.

Salvador Dalí (Spanish, 1904–1989), The Fish Man (L’homme poisson), 1930. Oil on canvas, 10 1⁄2 x 7 1⁄2 in. (26.7 x 19.1 cm). Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase with funds from The Meadows Foundation; Hollyand Doug Deason; Mrs. Eugene McDermott; Linda P. and William A. Custard; and Gwen and Richard Irwin, MM.2014.11. Photo by Brad Flowers. © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society

Lectures, Symposia, and Events

Thursday, March 1, 5:30 PM
purple square MUSIC AT THE MEADOWS
Oldovini Organ Recital
Larry Palmer, professor emeritus of harpsichord and organ, SMU
Enjoy these special opportunities to experience centuries-old music on an eighteenth-century organ surrounded by masterworks in the Meadows Museum’s permanent collection.
Free
Virginia Meadows Galleries

 

Friday, March 2, 12:15 PM
green square GALLERY TALK
Women of the Art World and Works of Baroque Seville
Alicia Zuese, associate professor of Spanish, Dedman College of Humanities & Sciences
Free with regular Museum admission
Jake and Nancy Hamon Galleries

 

Thursday, March 8, 6:00 p.m.
purple square SYMPOSIUM KEYNOTE LECTURE
The Medieval World in a Spanish Context
Julian Raby, Dame Jillian Sackler Director of the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art
Description to come
Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

Friday, March 9, 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
purple square SYMPOSIUM
The Medieval World in a Spanish Context
Ana Cabrera, Th­e Victoria & Albert Museum/Museo Nacional de Arte Decorativo, Madrid
Jordi Camps, chief curator of Romanesque art, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya
Heather Ecker, principal, Viridian Projects
Charles T. Little, curator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Therese Martín, tenured scholar, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid
Christine Sciacca, ­ associate curator of European art, 300–1400 CE, The Walters Art Museum
Shannon Wearing, affiliate, UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Organized by Amanda W. Dotseth, the Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, this symposium brings together international scholars on the art of the Middle Ages to explore the breadth of objects found within the context of Spanish collections, both medieval and modern. From Islamic textiles and metalwork to North African ivory, manuscripts of varied manufacture, and Scandinavian red deer antler, the materials and production methods found in Spanish contexts reflect the diversity of the medieval world.
Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

Thursday, March 22, 6:00 p.m.
red square LECTURE
From Rodin to Plensa: Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum
Steven A. Nash, former director, Palm Springs Art Museum; founding director, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
Laura Wilson, photographer, Dallas
Join us for a special double lecture as we launch the publication of From Rodin to Plensa: Modern Sculpture at the Meadows Museum. ­This beautifully designed permanent collection catalogue features new research by Nash about the objects in the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture collection, along with artistic photographs of the sculptures by Wilson. ­The stunning images Wilson captured for this exceptional book set it apart from a typical catalogue, making it a work of art in its own right. Each will share their experiences working on the project. ­This program will be followed by a reception and book signing with the author and photographer; books can be pre-purchased when making reservations.
Free (does not include book); reservations required at 214.768.8587
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

Friday, March 23, 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
purple square WORKSHOP
Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
In honor of Women’s History Month, the Meadows Museum again collaborates with The Cedars Union on a community event to teach people how to edit, update, and add articles on Wikipedia, in order to bring meaningful change to the knowledge available about female artists and art world figures, and encourage greater female editorship on Wikipedia. All are welcome, regardless of experience, gender or background. Event is come and go.
FREE; learn more and register
Constantin Foundation Seminar Room

 

Friday, April 19, 6:00 p.m.
red square LECTURE
Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson Sweeney in the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Beatriz Cordero, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid
This lecture will focus on Eduardo Chillida’s exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in 1966, the first show of the Spanish artist outside Europe. In this exhibition James Johnson Sweeney, then director of the MFAH, offered an insightful view of Chillida’s sculpture. He underlined the “lightness and rightness” of Chillida’s works, as well as the artist’s roots in Spanish artistic traditions. Sweeney’s consideration of Chillida as a “tastebreaker” and as “the foremost sculptor of his generation” anticipated the later understanding of the qualities of his works.
Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

 

Friday, April 20, 12:15 p.m.
green square GALLERY TALK
Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown
Jed Morse, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center
Free; reservations required at 214.768.8587
Nasher Sculpture Center and Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center*
* Note: Participants will be walking between the two institutions.

 

Saturday, April 21, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
purple square Meadows Family Day: Founders’ Day Celebration
Visitors of all ages can explore the sculptures and works on paper of Eduardo Chillida. Activities will include hands-on 2-D and 3-D art projects, and sensory approaches engaging visitors through sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Enjoy special entertainment, activities, refreshments, and more!
FREE

 

Thursday, April 26, 5:30 p.m.
purple square MUSIC AT THE MEADOWS
Oldovini Organ Recital
Larry Palmer, professor emeritus of harpsichord and organ, SMU
Enjoy these special opportunities to experience centuries-old music on an eighteenth-century organ surrounded by masterworks in the Meadows Museum’s permanent collection.
Free
Virginia Meadows Galleries

 

Friday, April 27, 12:15 p.m.
green square GALLERY TALK
Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas
Scott Winterrowd, director of education
Free with regular Museum admission
Downstairs Galleries

 

Thursday, May 31, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
(All dates: May 31, June 7 & 14)
red square LECTURE SERIES
Light, Camera, Landscape: The Rise of International Impressionism
Nancy Cohen Israel, art historian and owner of Art à la Carte
Technological advances in the nineteenth century made it possible for artists to work en plein air. ­The advent of train travel and tubed pigments beckoned urban artists to villages such as Barbizon and Fontainbleau. Taking full advantage of natural light, these painters started an artistic revolution. Not only did the Paris School become a magnet attracting artists from across Europe and the United States, but it ultimately sent them back to their home countries, bringing this radical new style with them. ­This series will trace the rise of Impressionism in France, the offshoots of painters in Spain and Italy, and the aftershocks that it sent throughout the West.
$40 for the 3-part series; free for Museum members, and SMU faculty, staff, and students; registration required at 214.768.8587
Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium

Meadows Museum Exhibitions and Lectures

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), Still Life in a Landscape, 1915. Oil on canvas. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Algur H. Meadows Collection, MM.69.26. Photo by Michael Bodycomb. © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

August 6 – November 5, 2017

During the run of his first solo exhibition at the Paris gallery of Berthe Weill in spring 1914, Mexican artist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) had an opportunity to visit Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) in his Paris studio. Rivera recounts this solemn rite of passage:

“I went to Picasso’s studio intensely keyed up to meet Our Lord, Jesus Christ.… As for the man…a luminous atmosphere seemed to surround him.… Picasso asked me to stay and have lunch with him, after which he went back with me to my studio. There he asked to see everything I had done from beginning to end.… [W]e had dinner together and stayed up practically the whole night talking. Our thesis was Cubism – what it was trying to accomplish, what it had already done, and what future it had as a ‘new’ art form.”

– from D. Rivera, My Art, My Life

 

The Zurbaran paintings and other works hanging in Auckland Castle’s Long Dining Room. Photo by Colin Davison. © Auckland Castle Trust/ Zurbarán Trust

Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle

September 17, 2017 – January 7, 2018

This exhibition marks the first time these precious holdings will be presented in America, and only the second time in history that they leave Auckland Castle, a unique opportunity to admire a rare assemblage of Zurbarán’s oeuvre. A major study of the series is being undertaken that will include a meticulous technical analysis of all the paintings as well as the publication of a catalogue with essays by a number of specialists. After its presentation at the Meadows Museum the works will be featured at The Frick Collection in New York, the only other venue for this exhibition.

Lectures

On Friday, October 20, Nancy Cohen Israel will be presenting the gallery talk Dressing the Part: Reflected Prophecies in Zurbarán’s Sons of Jacob at the Meadows Museum.

The lecture will begin in the galleries of the Meadows Museum at 12:15 pm. It is free with regular Museum admission.

 

 

Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, & Upcoming Lectures

Meadows 2017 Exhibition Between Heaven and Hell

Exhibitions

Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

Mar. 12-Jun. 11, 2017

 

Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco: The Spanish Civil War in Print

Apr. 2-Jul. 2, 2017

 

Lectures

Lecture: Ribera and the Empire of Resemblances

Apr. 20, 6:00 pm

Todd Olson

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: “Disegnare meglio che il Caravaggio:” Ribera’s Drawing Practice in Context

Apr. 28, 12:15 pm

Mary Vaccaro

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: The Impact of Titian’s Painterly Technique on Velázquez

May. 5, 6:00 pm

Diane Bodart

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture Series: The Global Art Community: A 17th Century Phenomenon

Jun. 8-29, 6:00 pm

Nancy Cohen Israel

Meadows Museum

 

The Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, Lectures

Exhibitions

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

The Festival Book for San Fernando: Celebrating Sainthood in Baroque Seville

Through Jan. 29, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera

Mar. 12-Jun. 11, 2017

Meadows Museum

 

Events

Artist Demonstration: Drawing Tools

Mar. 10, 6:00 pm

Sandy Rodriguez

Meadows Museum

 

Lectures

Lecture: Rafael Barradas and the Development of the Spanish Avant-Garde

Jan. 19, 6:00 pm

Jed Morse

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture Series: Reflecting on Ribera: Art and Culture in Spain and Spanish Naples, 1600-1700

February 3, 10:30 am

February 10, 10:30 am

February 24, 10:30 am

March 3, 10:30 am

Adam Jasienski, Assistant Professor of Art History, SMU

Meadows Museum

The four lectures in this series examine the world and work of the Spanish-born artist Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652), who is the subject of the upcoming Meadows Museum exhibition Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera. By carefully analyzing specific artworks by Ribera and his contemporaries, the lectures situate Ribera within the broader context of the global Iberian empire, in which his chosen hometown of Naples played an integral role. Some of the themes examined include Ribera’s confrontation with the legacy of Caravaggio and Domenichino, his penchant for violent scenes of martyrdom and suffering, the appeal of his stark realism, and his creation of images that were both effective religious objects and cutting-edge contemporary artworks. Coffee and pastries are served in the Founders Room before each lecture, from 10 to 10:25 a.m. This program is made possible by gifts from The Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation and The Eugene McDermott Foundation.

Read more on this lecture.

 

Lecture: Retired Art History Professor Turns to Crime (Writing)

Feb. 23, 6:00 pm

Alessandra Comini

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Velázquez, Curator to the King

Mar. 2, 6:00 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Juan Carreño’s Charles II and the Spanish Hall of Mirrors

Mar. 3, 12:15 pm

Julia Vazquez

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Sublime and Grotesque: Ribera and the Art of Drawing

Mar. 10, 10:30 am

Edward Payne

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Drawings are Paintings

Mar. 31, 12:15 pm

Mary Vernon

Meadows Museum

SMU and The Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, Lectures

Exhibitions

 

Juan de Valdés Leal (Spanish, 1622-1690), The Triumph of Saint Ferdinand, 1671. Etching. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase, MM.70.02. Photo by Michael Bodycomb

Juan de Valdés Leal (Spanish, 1622-1690), The Triumph of Saint Ferdinand, 1671. Etching. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase, MM.70.02. Photo by Michael Bodycomb

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo
October 9, 2016-January 29, 2017

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo is the first exhibition in America to present a comprehensive survey of modern art in Spain during the first half of the twentieth century. The rich and diverse art created by Spanish artists during this period is largely unknown in the US due in part to the turmoil that took place in Spain at this time. Displaying highlights from the extensive modern art collection of the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo (ACAC) with works from the Meadows Museum, this exhibition brings together more than 90 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper to demonstrate the most important aspects of modern Spanish art and shed light on the global connection between Spanish art and other international modern art movements.

 

The Festival Book for San Fernando: Celebrating Sainthood in Baroque Seville
October 9, 2016-January 29, 2017

Rarely-seen etchings by Juan de Valdés Leal (1622-1690) and other Spanish Baroque masters from the lavishly illustrated festival book Fiestas de la Santa Iglesia Metropolitana y Patriarcal de Sevilla al nuevo culto del Señor Rey San Fernando el tercero de Castilla y de León (Seville: Viuda de Nicolás Rodríguez, 1671) provide a fascinating look at the extravagant 5-day festival in 1671 Seville that was held for the cult of King Ferdinand III of Castile, or San Fernando (r. 1217-1252).

 

Events

INsights and OUTlooks
Nov. 12, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Meadows Museum

 

Lectures

Gallery Talk: Sainthood and Festival in Baroque Seville

Nov. 4, 12:15 pm

Rebecca Quinn Teresi

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: From Galas to Gutters: Maruja Mallo in Madrid

Nov. 17, 6:00 pm

Anna Wieck

Meadows Museum

 

Lecture: Modeling Maternity

Dec. 1, 6:00 pm

Maite Barragán

Meadows Museum

 

Gallery Talk: Spanish Surrealism from Dalí to Domínguez

Dec. 9, 12:15 pm

Josh Rose

Meadows Museum

 

SMU Lecture 2016

Mark Rosen, Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

1581 map of a region of Gueytlalpa, Mexico, from the Relaciones Geograficas of King Philip II of Spain. It is part of a manuscript book answering questions about the region for the king, interspersed with drawings of the territory, probably by a native hand. I studied this at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at UT Austin.

1581 map of a region of Gueytlalpa, Mexico, from the Relaciones Geograficas of King Philip II of Spain. It is part of a manuscript book answering questions about the region for the king, interspersed with drawings of the territory, probably by a native hand. I studied this at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at UT Austin.

I was fortunate to have been awarded an SFDA by the School of Arts and Humanities at UT Dallas for the academic year 2015–16, and have used it to research and begin writing a book entitled The Bird’s-Eye View and the Viewer, concerning the links between the visual, technological, and rhetorical strategies employed by the precursor to the modern city map.

Anyone who has ever looked at maps recognizes the progression from the medieval “city icon” view to the Enlightenment-era ground plan to the satellite-based GPS matrices we regularly employ today.

My work concerns the moment when the purely visual mode of mapping began to insist not only upon the verisimilitude of the viewer’s experience but also of the mechanical measurements that made it possible. Addressing the means by which territory was surveyed, measured, and depicted, my study rethinks the way artists and cartographers chose to orient their viewers towards landscapes both familiar and foreign.

A print illustrating how to construct one’s own plane table to survey territory. It comes from the following book: Leonhard Zubler, Fabrica et usus instrumenti chorographici (Basel, 1607). I saw it at the Huntington.

A print illustrating how to construct one’s own plane table to survey territory. It comes from the book Leonhard Zubler, Fabrica et usus instrumenti chorographici (Basel, 1607). I saw it at the Huntington.

As research for this project, I’ve held short-term residential fellowships in the past year from the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, and the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. In addition, I was invited by the Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art in Paris to participate in the “Allegory and Topography in the Early Modern Period (16th-18th Centuries)” symposium, held in June 2016, at which I presented a section of the book project, “The Pierre Levée of Poitiers as Allegorical Site in the Civitates orbis terrarum.”

My forthcoming publications include an archive-based study of the early–seventeenth century “Sultan” Jachia ben Mehmet, published in the edited volume The Grand Ducal Medici and Their Archive (Turnhout: Harvey Miller, 2016), and a detailed analysis of the maritime-themed façade of the late Seicento Venetian church of Santa Maria del Giglio. During the past year, I presented at the Meadows Museum colloquium Alba: Lives and Afterlives of a Historic Collection and spoke on Guercino’s Christ and the Woman of Samaria at the Sixteenth Century Society Conference in Vancouver and at the painting’s home institution, the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth. I also serve on the board of the Italian Art Society and as the society’s webmaster.

Mark Rosen
Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies

The Meadows Museum at SMU to host Zurbarán Masterworks in 2017

Zurbarán Paintings as installed in Auckland Castle

Zurbarán Paintings as installed in Auckland Castle

The Meadows Museum at SMU announces a touring exhibition of life-size paintings by the Spanish Golden Age master Francisco de Zurbarán (1598–1664), on loan from Auckland Castle in England. Proposed by the Meadows—in collaboration with The Frick Collection, the Kimbell Art Museum, and the Auckland Castle Trust—the project includes an analysis of the paintings at the Kimbell’s noted conservation lab, as well as a scholarly publication about the unique history of this series, the most significant public collection of the artist’s work outside of Spain. The exhibition marks the first time these works will travel to the United States, and will premiere at the Meadows in September 2017, followed by a presentation at The Frick Collection beginning in January 2018.

For the full release visit here.

SMU and The Meadows Museum Exhibitions, Events, Lectures

Óscar Domínguez (Spanish, 1906-1957), Untitled, 1947. Oil on canvas. Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo, Museo Patio Herreriano

Óscar Domínguez (Spanish, 1906-1957), Untitled, 1947. Oil on canvas. Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo, Museo Patio Herreriano

Exhibitions

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo
Oct. 9, 2016 – Jan. 29, 2017

The Festival Book for San Fernando: Celebrating Sainthood in Baroque Seville
Oct. 9, 2016 – Jan. 29, 2017

 

Events

Music at the Meadows – Andalucia
Sep. 8, 6:30 – 8:00 pm
Duo Cuenca

International Symposium – Modern Spanish Art
Oct. 7, 10:30 am – 1:00 pm

Family Day – Modern Spanish Art
Oct. 15, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

 

Lectures

SMU’s Comini Lecture Series
Thursday, September 15, 2016
5:30 pm, Meadows Museum Auditorium, SMU
Nina Dubin
, University of Illinois at Chicago

Lecture Series: The Spanish Labyrinth: Spain, its Civil War, and Modern Art, 1915-1975
Oct. 14 – Nov. 18, 10:30 – 11:30 am
Kenneth Andrien
Meadows Museum

Gallery Talk: Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo
Oct. 21, 12:15 pm
Scott Winterrowd
Meadows Museum